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ISP

art
by

Alice Zheng

on 17 January 2013

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Transcript of ISP

Historical Art Renaissance (1280 – 1600) Early Renaissance art was created at the same time as late Medieval art. By 1500 the Renaissance style dominated. Renaissance art used Classical antiquity (a period when Greece and Rome had great influence all over the world) as its base, but was combined with developments in northern European art and the current science. Renaissance art spread throughout Europe and is a transition (in Europe) from medieval to neoclassicism.
Proto (early) -Renaissance, 1280 - 1400
Early Netherlandish painting, 1400 - 1500
Mannerism and Late Renaissance, 1520 - 1600
Italian Renaissance, late 1300s - 1600 Renaissance to Neoclassicism (1585 – 1830) 1280 1600 1300 1400 1500 Lady with a Unicorn
by Raphael The Sistine Chapel
by Michelangelo Mona Lisa
by Vincent van Gogh The Last Supper
by Leonardo da Vinci This period is a transition from Renaissance to Neoclassicism. The Neoclassicism art period drew inspiration from the art and culture of Ancient Greece and/or Ancient Rome. The main part of this period was at the same time as the 18th century Age of Enlightenment (a cultural movement with the purpose of using reason to challenge ideas based on tradition and faith, and promote science and skepticism). Neoclassicism continued into the early 19th century.
Baroque, 1600 - 1730 (including Dutch Golden Age painting, 1585 – 1702 and Flemish Baroque painting, 1585 – 1700)
Rococo, 1720 - 1780
Neoclassicism, 1750 - 1830 1585 1830 1600 1700 1800 Medusa
by Caravaggio Bentheim Castle
by Jacob Isaakszoon van Ruysdael Madame d'Haussonville
by Ingres Oath of the Horatii
by Jacques-Louis David Romanticism originated in Europe near the end of the 1700s and reached its peak around 1800 to 1840. It was a revolt against the more dignified social and political standards from the Age of Enlightenment. Art was made with strong emphasizing on emotions such as apprehension, horror/terror, and awe. Realism is considered to be the opposite of Romanticism. Overall, Romanticism approved of imagination and allowed freedom from the classical ideas of art.
Nazarene movement - 1820 - late 1840s
Purismo - 1820 - 1860s
Luminism - 1850s – 1870s
Hudson River school - 1850s – 1880 Romanticism (1820 – 1880) This ISP compares the differences in art during the two major art periods, historical and modern. Historical includes renaissance, neoclassicism, and romanticism. Modern includes modern and postmodern (also known as contemporary). The differences that will be compared are; what each period was like overall, what mediums they used, how realistic the art is, art and entertainment, and reasons or purposes for producing art. Modern Art Introduction Modern art is often mistaken or thought of as Contemporary art. Modern art includes artistic works produced during the period from the 1860s to the 1970s. Modern artists experimented with new ways of seeing and had interesting ideas about art. Abstraction is the main characteristic of most modern art.
In Canada, there was a group of abstract artists who were called the “Painters Eleven” and were active from 1954-1960. Modern Art (1860-1970) Contemporary means anything produced during the present. Postmodern art emerged from modern art. Different types of postmodern art are intermedia, installation, conceptual, and multimedia. Some characteristics of postmodern art are the use of words as an element, collage, simplification, and appropriation. Contemporary/Postmodern
(1960 – present) Realistic-ness One of the differences between historical and modern art is how realistic the piece looks. Historical art is often more realistic but that does not necessarily mean that it looks more visually appealing. Both realistic and unrealistic paintings sculptures etc. have positive qualities and have attributes that the other doesn’t have. Allows artists to depict something in their own way rather than how everyone else sees it
More creative, and allows the viewer to use their imagination. The shapes and colours are slightly unrealistic yet the viewer can still tell are in the picture. Modern Art Historical Art A quick glance can easily allow the viewer to understand what the painting means and to respond emotionally Shadows and shading make the image appear 3D, in other words it looks like something one would see in real life
Allows painter to get a better understanding of space and shapes Another change that occurred between historical and modern art is what materials were used to produce it.






The self-portrait by Feuerbach looks more serious, the different colours blend together smoothly, and the colours used aren’t as bright. Meanwhile Kelloway’s self-portrait is still intense but much more colourful and the colours do not blend into each other much. The medium used affects the mood and overall appearance of the painting; therefore they must have used different materials. Feuerbach used oil paint and Kelloway used acrylic paint. Oil paint dries slowly, blends easily, and gives more depth and shade to the painting. Acrylic paint dries quickly, doesn’t blend well, and makes the painting expressive in a different way. Oil was often used in historical works and acrylic is often used now. Depending on what qualities an artist wants while painting, both paints are effective. For example,
compare a self-
portrait by
Lauralee Kelloway
(postmodern), to a
self-portrait
by Anselm
Feuerbach
(renaissance). Materials An article found online from Frieze Magazine called “How has art changed?” surveyed 33 artists, critics, collectors, and directors of museums and galleries. It asked them to respond to the question and talk about important changes in art and areas related to. Many of the surveyed professionals mentioned that modern art is becoming more of an entertainment rather than a profession, like historical art was. Because art is now more important and global than it was before, the general public is more interested in it. Art fairs, auctions, galleries, and museums are more of a tourist attraction overall rather than individual events and places. In other words, although art has captured the interest of more people, its individual importance has decreased. Profession - Entertainment ISP on...
Comparing Historical
and Modern Art Renaissance (1300 - 1602) Early Renaissance art was created at the same time as late Medieval art. By the 1500s the Renaissance style dominated. Renaissance art used Classical antiquity (a period when Greece and Rome had great global influence) as its base, but was combined with northern European art. Renaissance art spread throughout Europe and is a transition from medieval to neoclassicism. Neoclassic art drew inspiration from the art and culture of Ancient Greece and/or Ancient Rome. The main part of this period was at the same time as the 18th century Age of Enlightenment, a cultural movement with the purpose of using reason to challenge ideas based on tradition and faith, and promote science and skepticism. Neoclassicism continued into the early 1800s. Renaissance - Neoclassicism (1600 – 1830) Romanticism originated in Europe near the end of the 1700s and reached its peak around 1800 to 1840. It was a sort of rebellion against the more dignified social and political standards from the Age of Enlightenment, encouraging imagination and allowing freedom from the classical ideas of art. Art was made with strong emphasizing on emotions such as apprehension, horror/terror, and awe. Romanticism (1790 – 1880) Finally, the last big difference is the purpose of why the art was made. Possible reasons for producing art are: money, fame, enjoyment, entertainment. This is linked with art turning into entertainment because now people create art that’s popular and to earn as much money as possible. Mostly young artists are making art for cash rather than their own enjoyment. Although in the historical periods everyone obviously wanted to make a steady income and their works were visually appealing, art works in the historical period weren’t AS influenced by the public as they are now. In the Renaissance period, many artists learned from experts from a young age because they enjoyed painting or sculpting and wanted to be able to create works of their own. Some people nowadays do it to become famous. They’re talented, they have the materials, but they don’t really want to create art other than for the purpose of becoming well known. Reasons / Purposes One artist suggests that there has been much change over the past years, but the world is quickly adapting to them to make the shifts look as if they are unimportant. Another artist and professor, believes that technological ways of creating art are an improvement because the traditional ways are clumsier and imprecise. Another artist believes that art is always challenging the current state of things, so it will never be truly better or worse than the arts before and after it. Other Opinions About How Art has Changed In conclusion, neither historical nor modern art can be classified as ‘better’ than the other because each has its own pros and cons. The definition of art from the Oxford dictionary is, “The expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture, producing works to be appreciated primarily for their beauty or emotional power”. Both historical and modern art have a lot of great qualities and some not-so-great ones. They may have different ideas of skill and imagination, beauty and emotional power, but that is why each is classified differently. As said before, art is always contradicting society’s expectations, so the current style will never be accepted by everyone and it will forever be changing. Conclusion THANK YOU ! for listening Modern art has exciting colours and textures, which attracts attention. Most historical artists didn’t make paintings that were specifically made to stand out or have textures.
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