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No Pain, Lots Of Game

Can playing video games reduce the sensation of pain?
by

kyle fields

on 25 November 2012

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Transcript of No Pain, Lots Of Game

. Large, flat, heavy bowl or basin
. Ice cubes, a few trays
. Cold water
. Kitchen thermometer, or any thermometer capable reading temperatures between 30F and 45F
. Volunteers, at least three
. Chair
. Towel
. Stopwatch
. Computer or video game console; handheld consoles
. Video games
. Lab notebook
. Graph paper Obstacle 1 Obstacle 2 Obstacle 3 Goal Start Abstract Procedures (continued) Hypothesis- My hypothesis is that playing video games reduce the sensation of pain.
Purpose- The purpose is to see if playing video games reduce the sensation of pain. No Pain, Lots of Game by kyle fields Materials materials Procedures You might have heard the expression,"Take two aspirin, and call me in the morning." What if instead a doctor said,"Play two video games and call me in the morning"? Would you be shocked? Or think it was time for a new doctor? In this science fair project, you'll investigate whether video games, and other forms of mental distraction, have the power to relieve pain. 1. Fill the bowl or basin with a single layer of ice cubes.
2. Add cold water until the ice cubes are just covered.
3. Measure the temperature of the water with a thermometer until the temperature stops changing rapidly, and is stable. Record the temperature of the water in a lab notebook.
4. Obtain your first volunteer and have him/her remove any footwear. Be sure the volunteer knows beforehand about the experiment. Spread a towel in front of the chair and make sure there are no cords underfoot. Have an adult help you with the water and put it on top of the towel. Be careful with the cords.
5. Have the volunteer carefully rest his/her heel on the edge of the bowl of water, being careful not to tip it over with their weight of their foot.
6. Explain to the volunteer about what to do: "When I say go, dip all of your toes into the water, but keep your heel on the edge of the bowl. When you can't stand the cold anymore, take your toes out of the water."
7. Set the stopwatch at zero, and then say go, and press start on the stopwatch as the volunteer dips their toes into the ice water.
8. When the volunteer removes his or her toes from the ice water, press stop on the stopwatch and record the time in a data table for this volunteer in your lab notebook.Do not let the volunteer stay in the ice water longer than 3 minutes (cold injury can occur). Stop the test if more than 3 minutes have passed, give that volunteer a polar bear award, and find a different test subject. If a volunteer is able to go past 3 minutes without distractions, this volunteer's insensitivity to cold does not make him or her a good test subject for your experiment, and you will need to find somebody else. If you do need to find a new volunteer, repeat the Testing the Volunteer When He or She Is Not Distracted section.
9. Tell the volunteer that you are now going to repeat the test using the other foot, while he or she is playing a video game. 10. Have the volunteer sit down and play a video game that he or she enjoys for 5 minutes. Use a stopwatch to monitor the time. While the volunteer is playing, check the temperature of the ice water with the thermometer, and if it has risen a degree or more from the previous reading, then add an ice cube or two to bring it back down to within one degree of your previous reading. Record the temperature in your lab notebook.
11. When your volunteer has played the video game for at least 5 minutes, spread a towel out on the floor in front of him or her, as before, and have an adult place the bowl of water on top of the towel. Be careful to avoid any cords.
12. While the volunteer is playing, have the volunteer rest his or her heel of the other (untested) foot on the edge of the bowl, as in step 6, then have him or her dip the toes into the ice water while you start the stopwatch. Be sure to tell your volunteer to remove his or her foot when the water becomes too cold to stand any longer.
13. Stop the stopwatch when the volunteer removes his or her foot from the ice water. Again, do not let the volunteer keep his or her foot in the water longer than 3 minutes,to prevent injury.
14. Record the time that your volunteer's toes were in the ice water while he or she was playing a video game in the data table.
15. Repeat Testing the Volunteer When He or She Is Not Distracted and Testing the Volunteer While He or She is Playing a Video Game for your other two volunteers.
16. Then repeat Testing the Volunteer When He or She Is Not Distracted and Testing the Volunteer While He or She is Playing a Video Game sections two more times for each volunteer so that each volunteer has tested with and without distractions three times each. Make sure that you separate each volunteer's trial by at least 2 hours to let their feet recover, or the additional trials can even be on different days. Also make sure that your ice water is within one degree of your initial trials each time you get ready to test.
17. Gather your data tables for each volunteer and examine the averages. Do different volunteers have different tolerances to unpleasant sensations?
18. For each volunteer, subtract the average time that the volunteer was able to keep his or her toes in the ice water without distractions, from the average time that the volunteer was able to keep his or her toes in the ice water while playing a video game, and enter that difference in a data table, like the one below, in your lab notebook. Did playing a video game increase the volunteer's tolerance to the cold ice water? By how much? Do you think video games are a good method to help a person manage pain?
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