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GSHS - Year 8 - culture

Year 8 Culture resouces and projects.
by

lorna philcock

on 2 April 2014

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Transcript of GSHS - Year 8 - culture

Discover and explore work from around the world.
Year 8 Culture projects.
Africa
India
Japan
China
Britain
Spain
America
Australia
Egypt
Aboriginal.
Starter activies
Objective
: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST:
Select one piece of artwork below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
LEVELS: 4-5

SHOULD
: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work.
LEVELS: 6-7
COULD:
Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures.
LEVELS: 7-8
Select an image below and explain what you can see. Explain why you like it, what materials have been used? Does it tell a story? Copy out your favorite section with colour.
Extension task.
Questions and ideas:
What is the piece called? Who made it?
Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork.
Abdoulaye konate le dos a l ame soul denial 2008 textile
Tracey Rose: Waiting for God
Ibrahim El Salah, The Last Sound, 1964
Objective:
You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST
: Select one African artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
LEVELS: 4-5

SHOULD
: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work.
LEVELS: 6-7
COULD:
Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures.
LEVELS: 7-8
The predominant art forms are masks and figures, which were generally used in religious ceremonies. The decorative arts, especially in textiles and in the ornamentation of everyday tools, were a vital art in nearly all African cultures.
Objective:
You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST:
Select one painting below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
LEVELS: 4-5

SHOULD:
Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work.

LEVELS: 6-7
COULD:
Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures.
LEVELS: 7-8
July 31st 1967.
Nigerian born, Chidi A. Okoye graduated with a distinction in sculpture (Higher National Diploma) from the Institute of Management and Technology in Enugu, Nigeria, in 1988. For the next six years he taught sculpture and drawing at Federal Polytechnic Oko Anambra State Nigeria. During this period, he created an outstanding collection, not only sculpting, but painting and writing as well
“When I paint, every attempt is to capture the feel of warmth, passion, joy and bliss in none objective or figurative composition. I enjoy experimentation of different media and subjects.”
“Take your time. My artwork cannot be understood and appreciated in a ten second glance. Allow my art to grow on you, becoming more interesting and more enjoyable to look at as you live with it.”
Chidi Okoye
Jewellery.
Traditions.
Colours
Tribes.
Masks
The creation of Egypt
Two separate kingdoms (ruled by different kings) developed along the Nile River. The kingdom in Upper Egypt was known as the white crown and the kingdom in Lower Egypt was called the red crown. In about 3200 B. C. the pharaoh of the north conquered the south and Egypt became united. The pharaoh's name was King Narmer or Menes.
Menes built a new capital city called Memphis. In the Greek language the word Memphis meant "Balance of the Two Lands."
A large river called the River Nile flows through the country into the Mediterranean Sea. The Nile enters Egypt from the Sudan and flows north for about 1545 km (about 960 m) to the sea.

Where did the Ancient Egyptians live?
The Ancient Egyptians lived along the banks of the river Nile in Egypt. Farmers first settled in Egypt along the River Nile around 5000 B.C.

Where do most people in Egypt live today?
About 95 % of Egypt's population still live in the Nile valley (the area next to the river).

Why is the River Nile important to the Egyptians today and in the past?
Egypt is mainly made up of hot deserts and receives little rainfall. Without the River Nile, the area would be entirely desert.

What is meant by "the gift of the Nile"?
All of Egypt depended on the Nile for water, food and transportation. The Nile also provided the ancient Egyptians with fertile land which helped them to grow their crops and raise their animals.
Before modern dams were built the river Nile would flood each year coating the land on either side of the river with thick back mud. This mud was ideal for growing crops on.
Facts about the country.
Sculptures.
Questions and ideas:
What is the piece called? Who made it?
Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork.
Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one African artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5 SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7 COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
Art work.
Questions and ideas:

Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork.
Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one African artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5 SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7 COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
Pyramids and the afterlife.
What is the afterlife?
The Egyptians believed that when they died, they would make a journey to another world where they would lead a new life. They would need all the things they had used when they were alive, so their families would put those things in their graves. Egyptians paid vast amounts of money to have their bodies properly preserved. Egyptians who were poor were buried in the sand whilst the rich ones were buried in a tomb
How do pyramids help us know so much about life in Ancient Egypt?
Ancient Egyptians were buried with their belongings and the tomb walls were painted with scenes from the dead persons life. By examining the objects (artefacts) and paintings in the tombs, we have been able to understand a lot more about life in Ancient Egypt.
We can learn about how the Egyptians lived by looking at the objects stored in pyramids ready to be used in the afterlife.
What was is the name of the most famous pyramid?
The Great Pyramid is the largest and most famous of the pyramids. It was built for the Pharaoh Khufu. It is over 140 metres high and took 20 years to build.
What guards the pyramids?
The Sphinx stands in front of all the pyramids in Giza. It has the body of a lion and the head of a pharaoh.
Where were they built?
The Egyptians believed that if the pharaoh's body could be mummified after death the pharaoh would live forever. The tombs were designed to protect the buried Pharaoh's body and his belongings.
The pyramids are the stone tombs of Egypt's kings - the Pharaohs and one of the world's greatest historical mysteries. They have stood for thousands of years, filled with many hidden secrets: clues about what life (and death) was like in Ancient Egypt
What are pyramids?
Scale:
African Facts:
Population:
The population of Africa has grown quickly, from 220 million in 1950 to one billion in 2009. In many African countries, particularly those below the Sahara, more than 40 percent of the population are below 15 years of age. In the United States, this figure is 20 percent.
Wildlife:
The deserts, jungles, and plains of Africa are home to some of Earth's most extraordinary animals. The African elephant is the world's largest land animal. The giraffe is the world's tallest animal. The cheetah is the world's fastest land animal. The gorilla is the world's largest primate.
Geographical facts:
The highest mountain in Africa is Mt. Kilimanjaro, which is 19,340 ft high. Even though it sits almost on the equator, Kilimanjaro is so tall that glaciers form at its summit. The Sahara is the world's largest desert, at 3.5 million square miles, nearly the size of the United States. The largest city in Africa is Cairo, the capital of Egypt.
Africa is the second-largest continent on Earth, with an area of 11.7 million square miles. Not surprisingly for such a huge land mass, it is home to an incredible variety of climates, cultures, animals and plants. There are 53 countries in Africa and approximately 1 billion people.
Spain.
The painting
"Guernica" is also the name of a famous painting by Pablo Picasso, depicting the bombing of Guernica. Pablo Picasso, asked by the Spanish Republican government to paint a picture to decorate the Spanish Pavilion during the 1937 World's fair in Paris, created a painting depicting the event and called it Guernica.
Picasso's Guernica depicts people, animals, and buildings wrenched by the violence and chaos of the carpet bombing. This large canvas embodies for many the inhumanity, brutality and hopelessness of war, and the cruelty of bombing civilians.
After the fair, when the Republican government had fallen, Picasso refused to allow this painting, one of his most famous, to be displayed in Spain until after the end of the Franco regime. It therefore spent many years at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, but was repatriated after Franco's death. It is now in the Queen Sophia Museum in Madrid.
A copy of Picasso's Guernica is displayed on the wall of the United Nations building in New York City, at the entrance to the Security Council room. It was placed there as a reminder of the horrors of war.
Facts about Spain.
Spain is a country located in South Western Europe on the Iberian Peninsula.
The capital (and largest city) is Madrid.
The Population of Spain is estimated to be just over 46 million.
Spain has the lowest population density in Western Europe (excluding Scandinavia).
Spain has over 8,000km of beaches.
Spain has one of the most diverse landscapes and climates in Europe. The region of Almeria in the South East resembles a desert in places, while the North West in winter can expect rain around 20 days out of every month.
The Spanish National Day is 12 October.
Spain's territory includes the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean and the Canary Islands in the Atlantic.
The Spanish national anthem is called La Marcha Real (The Royal March).
Some Cities in Spain to visit are Alicante, Barcelona, Granada, Malaga, Murcia, Seville and Valencia.
Spain is the 28th most populated country in the world and the sixth most populated country in Europe (after Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Italy and the Ukraine).
Spain's Currency is the Euro.
The average life expectancy in Spain is 79.
Some well known Spanish artists include Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali and Joan Miró.
Bullfighting is considered an art as well as a sport and popular attraction. It is also the biggest and most controversial sport in Spain and is an integral part of Spanish history, art and culture with bull rings in all major cities and beyond.
Madrid is in the physical centre of the country.
There are no tooth fairies in Spain. Instead, there is a tooth mouse named Ratoncito Pérez.
Flamenco is a Spanish term that refers both to a musical genre, known for its intricate rapid passages, and a dance genre characterized by its audible footwork.
Spain is 5 times bigger than the UK with only two thirds of its population.
94% of the people in Spain are Roman Catholic.
Spain is the third biggest country in Europe (after France and the Ukraine).
Questions and ideas:
Who made it?
Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork.
OBJECTIVE: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST Select one African artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5 SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7 COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
Questions and ideas:
What is the piece called? Who made it?
Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
Compare each piece. What are the similarities and differences?
OBJECTIVE: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST Select one African artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5 SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7 COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
Questions and ideas:
What is the piece called? Who made it?
Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork.
OBJECTIVE: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST Select one African artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5 SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7 COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
Questions and ideas:
What is the piece called? Who made it?
Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork.
OBJECTIVE: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST Select one African artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5 SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7 COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973), was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer who spent most of his adult life in France. As one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, he is widely known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture,[2][3] the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907), and Guernica (1937), a portrayal of the German bombing of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War.
Pablo Picasso Styles The great artist experimented with new and innovative ideas such as Cubism, with Georges Braque, where objects were represented by cubes, cones, and cylinders. He also experimented with Surrealism which was a dream-like style where subjects are place in unusual positions, side by side, especially for comparison or contrast, called juxtapositions.
The Spanish painter Joan Miró was one of the first surrealists (artists who created art that emphasized fantastic imagery who were part of a movement called surrealism that began in the early twentieth century). Miró developed a highly personalized visual language that originated from prehistoric and natural sources.
Born: April 20, 1893 Died: December 25, 1983 Palma de Majorca, Spain
Antonio Gaudi
Gaudí, throughout his life, studied nature's angles and curves and incorporated them into his designs and mosaics.
On 7 June 1926 Gaudí was run over by a tram. Because of his ragged attire and empty pockets, many cab drivers refused to pick him up for fear that he would be unable to pay the fare. He was eventually taken to a paupers' hospital in Barcelona. Nobody recognized the injured artist until his friends found him the next day. When they tried to move him into a nicer hospital, Gaudí refused, reportedly saying "I belong here among the poor.“
He died three days later on 10 June 1926, at age 73, half of Barcelona mourning his death. He was buried in the midst of La Sagrada Família.[11]
As an architecture student at the Escola Tècnica Superior d'Arquitectura in Barcelona from 1873 to 1877, Gaudí was not particularly outstanding, but did excellently in his 'Trial drawings and projects'.

After five years of work, he was awarded the title of architect in 1878. As he signed the title, Elies Rogent declared, "Qui sap si hem donat el diploma a un boig o a un geni: el temps ens ho dirà" ("Who knows if we have given this diploma to a nut or to a genius. Time will tell.“

The newly-named architect immediately began to plan and design and would remain affiliated with the school his entire life. Buildings form the majority of his works, many of which can be found in Barcelona.
Bose Krishnamachari is an internationally acclaimed Malayali painter based in Mumbai, India He was born in 1963 at Magattukara village near Angamaly, Kerala. He had done his early schooling at GHSS Puliyanam. He took his BFA from Sir J J School of Art Mumbai in (1991), and then completed his MFA from Goldsmiths College, University of London in(2000). He was a recipient of the award of the Kerala Lalita Kala Akademi, and was first runner up for the Bose Pacia Prize for Modern Art, New York, 2001. His work comprises vivid abstract paintings, figurative drawings, and sculpture, photography and multimedia installations. Since 1986 he lives and works in Mumbai.Bose is the Artistic Director of international exhibition of contemporary art Kochi-Muziris Biennale
Bose Krishnamachari
Christ Series by F.N Souza
Scenes of village life by Amrita Shergill
Krishnamachari
Questions and ideas:
What is the piece called? Who made it?
Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork
Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one African artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5 SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7 COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
India's Facts: Area: 1,269,346 sq. miles Capital City: New Delhi Population: 1 billion Main Languages: Hindi, English, and Urdu Currency: Rupee Products: rice, wheat, oilseed, cotton, jute, tea, sugarcane, potatoes; cattle, water buffalo, sheep, goats, poultry
Diwali is a joyous celebration that takes place on the last day of the last month in the lunar calendar. This is usually at the end of October. During this five day holiday, people light oil lamps and set off fireworks. The holiday is also to worship the goddesses Kali and Lakshmi. People thank them for their good fortune and strength. Diwali is also the beginning of the new year. It is a time for people to reflect on the importance of their lives. They begin the new year with good habits.
The people of India have many languages, religions, and cultures. Religion has been very influential in the music, dance, festivals, and clothing of India. The unique sound of India's music is often created with an Indian instrument called a sitar. This instrument looks similar to a guitar, except that it has a very long neck. There are 18 official languages, but over 1,600 languages and dialects spoken in India. English is commonly spoken in India.
Clothing in India varies by area. Most women wear a sari made of colourful silk or cotton. The sari is one long piece of material that is draped around the body like a dress. Many men wear a dhoti. A dhoti is a white piece of cloth that is wrapped around the hips and pulled through the legs. Not all people dress traditionally in India, but the clothing is always loose due to the heat
India is a large country with the second biggest population in the world and many different languages, cultures, religions and climates
Indian facts:
Facts about China.
*The Great Wall of China was started over two and a half thousand years ago and is more than 5,000 km long.

*One-fifth of the world's population lives in China.

*Chinese people live in modern buildings in the towns, farmhouses in rural areas; houses made of bamboo and even caves in the mountains and sampans (houseboats) on the rivers and in harbours.

*Chinese wildlife includes tigers, leopards, snow leopards, monkeys, yaks and giant pandas. The birdlife includes peacocks, parrots, cranes and storks.

*Bamboo is a very fast growing plant which can grow up to one metre a day. Its eaten by Pandas.

*Thousands of years ago the Chinese had developed a calendar, writing, the wheel and a thriving silk industry and was advanced in astronomy and mathematics.

*China is particularly famous for its ceramics - in fact, guess where our word for "china" plates comes from!

*Chess is also a favourite pastime. Other popular board games are Go and Mahjong.

*The most important celebration is the Chinese New Year. This is the biggest national holiday and shops and offices are closed for three days
Painting taken from Wu Guanzhong‘s Animal gallery.
Painting of Bamboo by Zhang Ban Kui.
Landscapes of the Four Seasons (1950) by Fu Baoshi
Questions and ideas:
What is the piece called? Who made it?
Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork.
Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one African artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5 SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7 COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
Wu Guanzhong passed away in Beijing on June 25, 2010.
He has told of his admiration for Utrillo, Braque, Matisse, Gauguin, Cézanne and Picasso, and especially for Van Gogh.
Wu Guanzhong (吳冠中, 1919–2010) is one of the best known contemporary painters of Chinese origin. Wu has painted various aspects of China including much of its architecture, plants, animals, people, as well as many of its landscapes and waterscapes in a style reminiscent of the impressionist painters of the early 1900s. He has published collections of essays and dozens of painting albums. His paintings were exhibited at the British Museum in 1992, which was the first for a living Chinese artist.
Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one painting below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5 SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7 COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
TEACHER ASSESSMENT
EFFORT
Excellent Very good

Good Satisfactory

Poor

LEVEL
SELF ASSESSMENT
EFFORT
Excellent Very good

Good Satisfactory

Poor

LEVEL
How could you improve your achievements in the subject? Circle or underline the most appropriate answer (s)

Meeting class deadlines Meeting homework deadlines

Researching artists Being more punctual taking more care in your sketchbook

Improve attendance Concentrate in class Take more care with classwork

Other
Have you always continued to work to the best of your ability? Circle or underline the most appropriate answer.
ALWAYS SOMETIMES NEVER
In the box below list the key words used this term in relation to your classwork
Which artists have you looked at during this Project and what inspiration have you taken from these artists
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What skills/ techniques have your learnt?
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What art materials have you used?
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List three subject specific aspects of the project you have been successful at and explain why that is?
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What subject specific aspects of the project have you found the most challenging and how could you improve on them?
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3…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...
In the box below list the key words used this term in relation to your classwork
Which artists have you looked at during this Project and what inspiration have you taken from these artists
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What skills/ techniques have your learnt?
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What art materials have you used?
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List three subject specific aspects of the project you have been successful at and explain why that is?
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What subject specific aspects of the project have you found the most challenging and how could you improve on them?
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Germany
Native American Masks


Indigenous peoples from the regions of North America, including parts of Alaska.
They comprised of a large number of distinct tribes.
All the tribes were different from one another in culture and traditions.
Many tribes still exist today as political communities.

Who Were the Native American Indians?

Indian jewellery was composed from materials such as bone, teeth, shells, beads, and other natural items.
Beading was one of the most important styles of jewellery.

Native American Indian Jewellery

The Native American ‘masks’ had many and varied purposes, from entertainment to spiritual or medicinal purposes.
Many tribes believed that when an animal mask was worn, the actual spirit of the animal depicted entered the individual giving them the creatures power.

Native American Masks

Native American Indian Symbols










These are not all the tribes, there were many hundreds!

Native American Indian Tribe Map











Traditionally the clothing were made with deer, elk, moose and other skins or hand-woven materials.

Native American Indian Clothing

On the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492, he thought he had reached the continent of India.
By mistake he called the natives ‘Indians’ and this name has remained ever since

How did they get their name –
Native American INDIANS?

The meanings of the designs on totem poles are as varied as the cultures which produce them.
Totem poles may recount familiar legends, clan lineages, or notable events. Some poles are erected to celebrate cultural beliefs, but
others are intended mostly as artistic presentations.
Totem poles were never objects of worship.

Native American Indian Totem Poles

Longhouse

Teepee

Wigwam

There were many different types of American Indian houses in North America. Each tribe needed a kind of housing that would fit their lifestyle
and their climate.

Native American Dwellings

Eagle dancer

Supai Dancer

Elements of summer

Questions and ideas:
1. Who made the work?
2. Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
3. What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
4. What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
5. Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
6. Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork

Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one of the paintings below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of Dan Namingha. LEVELS: 4-5
SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7
COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8

Beads, shells, leathers, wood, feathers, animal hair.

They used a variety of animal images based on the environment around them.

The patterns were repeated and symmetrical in design.

Natural, Earth colours, produced by using the resources around them.

What type of patterns were used by the Native American Indians?

What type of animal images did they use in their culture?

What type of materials did they use within their culture?

What were the colours used in the culture?

Colours/ Images Used by Native American Indians

Native American Indians.
Hopi Eagle Dancer

Morning Kachina

Metamorphosis. Oil pastel on paper.

Dan Namingha (born in 1950) is an important Native American painter and sculptor. He was born in Keams Canyon, Arizona and is a member of the Hopi-Tewa tribe. He currently lives in Santa Fe, New
Mexico.

Style.
Dan Namingha has been showing professionally as an artist for 40 years. His heritage inspires his work, which explores connections between physical and the spirit world and includes of Hopi symbolism.
Drawing and painting was a natural part of Hopi childhood. It gave him a way to express his strong feelings about the culture and environment leading to a path of creative freedom. Dan feels that change and evolution are a continuum; socially, politically, spiritually and that the future of our planet and membership of the human race must be monitored to insure survival in the spirit of cultural and technology diversity.

Dan Namingha.

Albuquerque

New Mexico creates.

Questions and ideas:
1. Who made the work?
2. Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
3. What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
4. What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
5. Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
6. Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork

Margarete Bradshaw.

Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one piece below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of Margarete Bradshaw.
LEVELS: 4-5
SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7
COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8

Questions and ideas:
1. Who made the work?
2. Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
3. What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
4. What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
5. Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
6. Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork

James Auchiah

Harvest Dance. Oil on plaster. 1939

The Drummers

Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one piece below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of James Auchiah.
LEVELS: 4-5
SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7
COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8

Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. Becoming confident in comparing and discussing their work.
MUST: Compare the art work below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5
SHOULD: Can explain and discuss in SOME depth the similarities and differences between the two pieces. LEVELS: 6-7
COULD: Can explain and discuss in great depth the similarities and differences between the two pieces. Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8

camhs
camhs
Sigmar Polke. watchtower-iii

Gerhard Richter. Geast (Branches)
1988

Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one painting below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5
SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7
COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8

Adolf Wissel

Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one painting below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
LEVELS: 4-5
SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7
COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8

Adolf Hitler.

Sigmar Polke.
Oberkasseler Brücke, 1971-83

Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one painting below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5
SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7
COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8

treehouse-1976

watchtower-iii

(Oberkasseler Brücke), 1971-83,

Geast (Branches)

1988

Gerhard Richter.
Gerhard Richter (born 9 February 1932) is a German visual artist. Richter has simultaneously produced abstract
and photorealistic painted works, as well as photographs and glass pieces. His art follows the examples of Picasso and Jean Arp in undermining the concept of the artist's obligation to maintain a single cohesive style.

'Abstraktes Bild'

Arno Breker.

Adolf Wissel.

Adolf Wissel & Arno Breker: Approved artists during the Third Reich.

In July, 1937, the Nazis mounted a polemical exhibition entitled Entartete Kunst (Degenerate Art), in Munich
; it subsequently travelled around Germany and Austria. The show was intended as an official condemnation of modern art.
Expressionism, which had its origins in Germany, had the largest proportion of paintings represented.


Margarette. 1981.

March Heath, 1974, Oil, acrylic, and shellac on burlap, 46 1/4 x 100 inches

lets a thousand flowers bloom

Sigmar Polke
(13 February 1941 – 10 June 2010) was a German painter and photographer.
Polke experimented with a wide range of styles, subject matters and materials. In the 1970s, he concentrated
on photography, returning to paint in the 1980s, when he produced abstract works created by chance through chemical reactions between paint and other products. In the last 20 years of his life, he produced paintings focused on historical events and perceptions of them.

Anselm Kiefer.
(born March 8, 1945) is a German painter and sculptor. The poems of Paul Celan have played a role in developing Kiefer's themes
of German history and the horror of the Holocaust, as have the spiritual concepts of Kabbalah.

In his entire body of work, Kiefer argues with the past and addresses taboo and controversial issues from recent history. Themes from Nazi rule are particularly reflected in his work; for instance, the painting "Margarethe" (oil and straw on canvas) was inspired by Paul Celan's well-known poem "Todesfuge" ("Death Fugue").

Stables, 1913

The yellow Horses.

Piggies.

Franz Marc
(February 8, 1880 – March 4, 1916) was a German painter and printmaker, one of the key figures of the German Expressionist movement. He was a founding member of
Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), a journal whose name later became synonymous with the circle of artists collaborating in it.

Can you guess who produced these art works?

Scorpion dreaming. 2008.
Acrylic

Freddie Purla was born in 1968 in Darwin. The son of talented artist Barbara Weir, and grandson of the late Minnie Pwerle, Freddie Purla began painting in 1989 at Alice Springs. He was also the adopted nephew of the famous Emily Kame Kngwarreye. His work has sold to many collections in Germany, Amsterdam, Paris, Switzerland and New York.

Purla regularly visited Utopia with his family as a very young child, often staying for long periods before travelling to Alice springs or Adelaide. One of his first vivid memories as a child was of the strange looking creature, the Scorpion.

The Scorpion Dreaming has been passed down to Freddie by his grandmother’s family. As it’s sting is often very painful, the scorpion is left undisturbed and respected at all times. It is rarely seen during the day and only the desert sands display the signs of the scorpion’s track.

Purla’s paintings represent the courtship dance between the male and female scorpion. Each scorpion interlock their pincers together while traveling back and forth in what can only be described as a dance. After several hours and as much as 24 hours, the tracks that are left behind create an artwork i
n itself on the ground. The tracks which are criss-crossed over and over again are rare to find in the desert. Freddie’s paintings powerfully represent the energy and vigour of the many movements made by the scorpions in their ritual desert dance.

Molly Pwerle

Minnie Pwerle

Facts about aboriginal Art.

1.
Aboriginal art is based on important ancient stories: even contemporary Aboriginal art, is based on stories (Jukurrpa) and symbols centred on 'the Dreamtime' – the period in which Indigenous
people believe the world was created. The Dreamtime stories are up to and possibly even
exceeding 50,000 years old, and have been handed down through the generations virtually unchanged for all those years.

2.
Aboriginal art also stands as a written language: Aboriginal art is a major part of the unwritten 'encyclopaedia' of being an Aboriginal person and as such it may have many layers of meaning. Australian Aboriginal
people have no written language of their own, and so the important stories central to the people's culture are based on the traditional icons (symbols) and information in the artwork, which go hand in hand with
recounted stories, dance or song, helping to pass on vital information and preserve their culture.

3.
Paintings are also used for teaching: A painting (in effect a visual story) is often used by the aboriginal people for different purposes, and the interpretations of the iconography (symbols) in the artwork
can vary according to the audience. So the story may take one form when told to children, and a very different and higher level form when speaking to initiated elders. The stories behind many of the artworks
when related to children have a strong educational and behavioural aspect – a bit like a combination of western encyclopaedias and Aesops Fables where there can be information and/or a moral to the story where
good or bad behaviour and consequences are highlighted.

4.
Painting on Bark is the oldest form of Aboriginal art but many bark paintings have perished over time. Not only is the bark prone to decay and disintegration, but the ochre paints too need a stable substrade
(base on which to paint) to lengthen their own relatively short life.

5.
Artists need permission to paint a particular story: Where ancient and important stories are concerned, and particularly those containing secret or sacred information, an artist must have permission to paint
the story she or he paints. Traditional Aboriginal artists cannot paint a story that does not belong to them through family lineage.

Year: 2006 & 2012
Size: 122x122cm Scale of paintings
Colour: multi
Medium: Acrylic on linen

Year: 2006 & 2012
Size: 120x120 Scale of paintings
Colour: multi
Medium: Acrylic on linen



Molly Pwerle’s country is Atnwengerrp and her language is Anmatyerre and Alyawarr. She was born in approximately 1919 (no records exist) and has had little exposure to western culture. In fact, Molly picked up a paintbrush for the first time in 2004.

Molly's extended family are all artists including her sister the late Minnie Pwerle, Barbara Weir, Aileen and Betty Mpetyane, who all encouraged Molly and her younger sisters Gayla and Emily Pwerle to paint with their famed sister Minnie.

In late 2004 Barbara Weir, Minnie Pwerle’s daughter organised the first workshop of the sisters which was held at Ultja station. This inaugural workshop heralded the start of an amazing painting experience. Just as Minnie showed the glorious freedom
of expression, Molly, Emily and Galya followed suit. Another workshop was arranged and so it continues.

Minnie took a close and supportive role in the development of her younger sisters. The sisters had an instant response to applying paint onto canvas, developing expressions of their dreaming's that have been passed from generation to generation. Keeping the culture alive through the passing on of these symbols and patterns ensures the survival of these peoples in the harsh desert conditions.

Molly paints “Awelye Atnwengerrp”, meaning women’s ceremony in her country. “Awelye-Atnwengerrp” is depicted by a series of lines painted in different widths, patterns and colours that are explosive, colourful and energetic. The patterns represent the designs painted on women's bodies during bush tucker ceremonies in Atnwengerrp. Molly has developed her own unique, contemporary style and is progressing into a major talent.

Bush Medicine leaves

Titled ‘Bush Medicine’

Minnie Pwerle was born around 1922 in the Utopia country of Atnwengerrp and died 18th March 2006. Her languages were Anmatyerre and Alyawarre.

Minnie Pwerle’s emergence and dominance in the world of mainstream art has been compared to the legendary Emily Kame Kngwarreye, who like Minnie, began her painting career in her mid seventies and continued to paint with an energy that belied her age. The power of Minnie’s work is i
n the bold, expressive simplicity of her linear style which depicts Awelye Atnwengerrp, traditional women’s ceremonies. Her mesmerizing lines and circles convey painted breast designs and dance tracks around camp fires, whilst the smaller tighter circles often seen in her work represent bush melon, one of Minnie’s principal Dreaming's. Her canvas’ sing with Indigenous wisdom and a contemporary verve and express clearly the strong connection she enjoyed to both her country and her culture.

Minnie Pwerle exhibited her works extensively throughout Australia and the world with great success. She is regarded as one of Utopia’s foremost artists, with her paintings in continual and constant demand from galleries and private collectors.





















Gloria Petyarre




Gloria Petyarre. Gloria was born circa 1945, her country is Aknangkere and her language is Anmatyerre.

Gloria is a well established and well known artist whose paintings have been widely exhibited around Australia and all over the world. This artist is extensively documented with Gloria’s
work featured on the cover of Michael Bolton’s ‘The Art Of Utopia” and in 1999,
Gloria won the coveted Wynne prize.

Gloria’s dreaming's include “Mountain Devil”, "Aknangkere Growth” and the well known and sought after "Bush Medicine”. Gloria mainly uses a combination of lines to depict her art, but at
the same time can produce a dazzling display of intricate dot work – such is the versatility of this artist.

Gloria continues to dominate the art scene and DACOU highly recommends the work of this high profile artist.

Year: 2000
Size: 267x131m Scale of paintings
Colour: earth purple tan white
Medium: Acrylic on linen

Year: 2005
Size: 122x91cm Scale of paintings
Colour: red yellow orange
Medium: Acrylic on linen



Gloria Petyarre (b. 1945, Atnangkere Soakage, Northern Territory) is an Australian Aboriginal artist from the Anmatyerre community, just north of Alice Springs. She is a significant figure in contemporary Indigenous Australian art.

Gloria Petyarre won Australia's longest running art prize, the Wynne Prize in 1999 with Leaves, being the first Aboriginal person to win one of the Art Gallery of New South Wales's major prizes. She travelled to Ireland, England and India in 1990 as part of the
Utopia – A picture story exhibition. She held her first solo e
exhibition in 1991. She is represented in major Australian galleries such as the National Gallery of Australia. She is the niece of Emily Kngwarreye and the younger sister of Kathleen Petyarre, two noted Aboriginal artists.

Gloria lived at the Utopia community after 1977, where she started batik painting, exhibiting in shows around Australia for ten years. She began work on the 'Summer Project' in 1989 which involved translating the batik paintings onto canvas. She was one of the
founding members of this Utopia Women's Batik Group. She paints s
several Dreamtime stories such as Pencil Yam, Bean, Emu and Mountain Devil Lizard and Small Brown Grass. Her paintings – monochromatic or multi-coloured - are distinguishable for their well defined segments filled with curved lines, and evoke a strong rhythmic
quality. Her style has evolved into abstract fields that represent leaves, grasses and body paint


Year: 2001
Size: 120x90cm Scale of paintings
Colour: red white
Medium: acrylic on linen



Freddy Purla. Scorpion dreaming

Gloria Petyarre. Bush Medicine

Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. Becoming confident in comparing and discussing their work.
MUST: Compare the art work below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5
SHOULD: Can explain and discuss in SOME depth the similarities and differences between the two pieces. LEVELS: 6-7
COULD: Can explain and discuss in great depth the similarities and differences between the two pieces. Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8

Comparing artist’s work

Questions and ideas:
1. Who made the work?
2. Describe what you see. What is the piece about? (What colours have been used? Limited palette? ect..)
3. What do you think about the piece? Do you like it, why? If no then why, explain your answer.
4. What type of work is it? Abstract/still life/ nature.
5. Are there any emotions displayed within the piece?
6. Compare your own piece to that of your chosen artwork

Freddy Purla. Titled – Scorpion dreaming.

Gloria Petyarre. Titled –Bush Medicine. Acrylic

Minnie Pwerle. Acrylic on Material.

Artist Analysis

Objective: You will learn how to analyse the work of others from other cultural backgrounds.
MUST: Select one Aboriginal artists below. Use descriptive language to write about the work of others from other cultural backgrounds. LEVELS: 4-5
SHOULD: Can explain and discuss the colours used and emotions within the work. LEVELS: 6-7
COULD: Can compare their work with your own and compare cultures. LEVELS: 7-8
Full transcript