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QPOE2

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by

Laura Foreback

on 11 September 2014

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Transcript of QPOE2

QPOE2
Investigation Organizer
Question
Evaluation
Observation
Prediction
Explanation
Knowledge Probe
Investigation Plan
Data Analysis
Application
for Scientific Inquiry
Definition = The main idea of the investigation, generally worded as a question.
Purpose = to focus the investigation
Good questions come from a variety of experiences including "messing about" sessions, "Aha!" moments, "wonderings", brainstorming sessions, or any other experience that makes an investigator curious.
What makes a question
testable
?
A testable question is a question that can be answered by a scientific investigation.
Ask yourself these three questions to know if you have a strong investigation question....
1. Is this question DOABLE/TESTABLE? Is this investigation ethical? Are the materials available? Is enough time available?
2. Why is this question IMPORTANT? Would an investigation of this question be a worthwhile use of time?
3. Why is this question INTERESTING?
Testable: What color bird feeder attracts the most cardinals?

NOT Testable: What do birds eat?
Testable: Does the sun heat salt water and fresh water at the same rate?

NOT Testable: How does the sun heat liquids?
Testable: What is the effect of light on rate of seed germination?

NOT Testable: How do seeds grow?
Definition = The process of thinking about what you or others already knows about the topic.

Purpose = To activate and identify personal and scientific prior knowledge.
In this class, we will often pause after generating a question to complete a "Knowledge Probe" activity. These short activities will help us (1) figure out what we already know and (2) find out what other people know about our topic.
What do I think might happen?
Definition = an expected outcome of an investigation based upon prior knowledge.

Purpose = To begin the process of thinking about the investigation question by drawing on personal and scientific prior knowledge about the topic.
"If...then..." Format
To help us plan our investigations, we're going to use the "If...then..." format for writing our predictions.
If...[I do this]..., then...[this outcome will happen].
The basic form is...
Some examples:
If...[I do this]..., then...[this outcome will happen].
If different colored bird feeders are placed in the same area, then the red feeder will attract the most cardinals.
If plants are placed under different colored light, then the plants placed under green light will grow the least.
Predictions should be based on sound scientific reasoning.
If different colored bird feeders are placed in the same area, then the red feeder will attract the most cardinals. Birds have four different types of receptors in their eyes which allows them to see not only the color spectrum that humans can see, but also light in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum. Because cardinals are red, they may be more sensitive to
that region of the spectrum because
they need to see red well to find a mate.
If plants are placed under different colored light, then the plants placed under green light will grow the least. The color of visible light is determined by its wavelength. Plants appear green because wavelengths of light in the green region of the spectrum are reflected more than other wavelengths. When green light shines on plants, most of it will be reflected and therefore not converted into sugars by photosynthesis.
Image credit: http://seniorbiology.com/eei.html
Definition = The steps developed and used to conduct the investigation.

Purpose = To focus thinking on the best procedures for gathering data to design a fair test.
A "FAIR TEST" is a test that is
replicable (it can be repeated)
clearly states what is going to be observed, measured, and recorded
clearly states what will be changed
clearly states what will stay the same
The PROCEDURE is the list of numbered steps that the investigator will follow. It must be detailed enough that another person could follow it.
Definition = The process of gathering information from the investigation in a structured manner.

Purpose = to collect DATA.
Qualitative Data
Qualitative data are information gathered by using one's senses.

Examples: color, shape, texture, and odor

Qualitative data can be recorded using written descriptions, drawings, photographs, video, etc.
Quantitative Data
Quantitative data are information that can be measure or recorded using numbers.

Examples = number of leaves on a plant, mass, height, temperature, volume

All quantitative data must be labeled with units. (35 meters, 2.5 mL, 58 degrees F)
How do I make sense of my data?
Summarize and interpret observations
Determine what data are significant
Identify patterns and trends that explain the data
Make graphs that are appropriate for the data
Use simple statistics like mean, median, mode
What did I learn?
Definition = A set of statements providing the CLAIM made by the researcher based on the EVIDENCE collected and supported by sound REASONING.
Claim = A statement that answers the question

Evidence = data (information) that supports the claim.

Reasoning = the argument used to say why the evidence answers the question. A strong argument should include:
personal prior knowledge
how the investigation was a fair test
scientific concepts, principles, or theories
ideas, evidence, and arguments from others.
How well did I do?
Definition = a self-assessment process used to critique the inquiry investigation
The evaluation process is guided by a series of questions.
1. What are the sources of error?
2. What would you do differently next time?
3. How confident are you in your results? (see confidence chart)
4. What surprised you?
5. What would your prediction be if you conducted this experiment again?
6. What question would you like to pursue next?
Confidence Chart
Strongly confident:
I am strongly confident because I...
Conducted a minimum of 10 trials
Minimized potential sources of error
Had my results confirmed
Used scientific concepts, principles, or theories

Somewhat Confident:
I am somewhat confident because I...
Conducted a minimum of 5 trials
Attempted to minimize potential sources of error
Had my results confirmed
Used scientific concepts, principles, or theories

A Little Confident:
I am a little confident because I...
Conducted a minimum of 3 trials
Considered potential sources of error
Did not have my results confirmed
Did not use scientific concepts, principles, or theories

Not Confident at All:
I am not confident at all because I...
Conducted less than 3 trials
Did not consider potential sources of error
Did not have my results confirmed
Did not use scientific concepts, principles, or theories
How do I use what I have learned?
Definition = The meaningful use of newly constructed knowledge
To apply what you have learned, you might defend an argument, make a model, solve a problem, or design and conduct another investigation.
From the Van Andel Education Institute
Definition = the process of working with the data collected, ...
Full transcript