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Rhetorical Devices for Public Speaking

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by

Madeline Carson

on 3 February 2016

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Transcript of Rhetorical Devices for Public Speaking

Rhetorical Devices for Public Speaking
Antithesis
a figure of speech in which an opposition or contrast of ideas is expressed by parallelism of words that are the opposites of, or strongly contrasted with, each other, such as “hatred stirs up strife, but love covers all sins”
Litotes
ironical understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by the negative of its contrary (e.g., you won't be sorry, meaning you'll be glad ).
Alliteration
The occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words.
Anadiplosis
the repetition of the last word of a preceding clause. The word is used at the end of a sentence and then used again at the beginning of the next sentence.
Asyndeton
the omission or absence of a conjunction between parts of a sentence.
Diacope
the repetition of a word or phrase with one or two intervening words.
Antimetabole
As the repetition of words in successive sentences in reverse grammatical order, antimetabole is a rhetorical device used to emphasize a point by creating an easily remembered verbal association with it.
http://www.slate.com/blogs/lexicon_valley/2015/12/16/the_rhetorical_device_anadiplosis_uses_repetition_to_powerful_effect_and.html
“Now, this is not the end. No, it is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.”

— Winston Churchill, Mansion House, London, 20 November 1942
I came, I saw, I conquered. -Julius Caesar
Metaphor
a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable.
Simile
a figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another thing of a different kind, used to make a description more emphatic or vivid (e.g., as brave as a lion, crazy like a fox ).
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