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4.03 Cultural Changes of the 1920s

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Nakayla Spencer

on 8 December 2015

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Transcript of 4.03 Cultural Changes of the 1920s

4.03 Cultural Changes of the 1920s
Nakayla Spencer
Jazz Music
Jazz music became extremely popular during the 20’s, those years became known as the “Jazz Age.” As Jazz music swept the nation, a greater acceptance of African American culture developed as well.
Roles for Women
Many women believed that with the vote and economic power they should begin to assert themselves. They began attending college, and in return entered the workforce in the fields of nursing, teaching, social work, etc.
Prohibition
The passing of the 18th amendment made it illegal to produce, sell, or transport alcohol(ic) beverages in the U.S. This amendment was appealed by the 21st amendment in 1933, after it was determined that the law was not enforceable
Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was a period in time in which African American writers, musicians, and artists developed creative ways to express their experiences of being African American in the United States. These contributions made by these extraordinary African Americans changed American Culture.
Fundamentalism
Fundamentalism is a religious viewpoint based on the belief that biblical events happened exactly as described. Urbanization and the shift away from traditional values worried Americans, leading to their fundamentalist beliefs.
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