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Unit 2- Poetry

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by

Eric Russo

on 16 April 2012

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Transcript of Unit 2- Poetry

POETRY
UNIT 2
Writer's
Workshop

Structure
& Sound

Inferring
Thesis & Outline
Objective:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 2
Writing / Drafting
Objective:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 3
Monitor your Inner Voice
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 1
Entering/Leaving
Turn
and Talk=
Pull-Up=
Group Teams=
Cold Calling=
Stations=
Literature Circle=
Great Job/Off Task
Classroom Jobs
Absences
Raise Your Hand
Bathroom
Getting Up
5 Minute Drills=
INSTRUCTION
PROCEDURES
Ms. SNOWDON & Mr. RUSSO
HUMANITIES Grade 8
Have your Student Notebook and your agenda books
Get your FOLDER
Librarian gets Team Books
Everyone Begins Warm-Up
Finish Warm-up and begin Independent Reading
Entering
Leaving
Clean up your area (garbage, belongings)
Put all work in your FOLDERS
We will line you up once you are ready
Turn your Folder as you come up to line
We will escort you to the next class
Raise your Hand!
To ask a question ...
To answer a question ...
To make a comment ...
When you need help ...
+
A+
SUCCESS
LEARNING
ideas
100%
Great Job!
Off Task
When you are absent . . .
G
E
T
Up!
CLASS JOBS:
L
E
T
'S
Practice!
HW=
Quick Write=
You want to be HERE
Come in and get working
Work with your best effort
You want to be HERE
DON'T
Not taking learning seriously
talking
not working up to potential
•Falcon Bucks
•Positive Phone Call
•Note to Parent
•Prize Box
•Homework Pass
•Verbal Reminder
•Student Conference
•Parent Contact
•Guidance Notification
•Behavior Plan
GREAT JOB
OFF TASK
Everyone say the SMARTEST thing you can think of . . .
We will determine who says something in the smartest way.
Don't Do it
When the one of the teachers is instructing the class

During SSR

In the middle of a worktime or a station.
IT's OK
When it is for class

During transitions between stations

When you're working in groups

When you're feeling tired.
Class Time is IMPORTANT
School policy is two bathroom passes per clas, per quarter

No passes the first or last 15 minutes of the mod

We will be keeping track.
When You need to go
Raise your hand like this
Wait for one of us to come over
SSR=
Explicit Instruction = I do, We do, You do
When we are learning something new, or have to show you how to do something, everyone will come up to the front of the classroom
Why?
It is easier to stay focused.

We will be practicing together and talking with different people.

It gives us a chance to move around
This is Important!
Station Expectations:
We will be writing all year.
Sometimes we will work to write formal essays, and other times we will have a shorter "Quick Write" questions That will require three things:
Text Evidence
An opinion about the answer

An argument to support your opinion
and why your text evidence is relevant
We cover elements of grammar we will to make us all better writers
Sometimes Groups will be assigned
There will be group roles each time
Sometimes groups
will be moving between stations
You are your group
We need your attention -
You need to:
One Hand Up
Stop Talking
Raise your hand
Focus your attention on us
L
E
T
'S
Practice!
Everyone talk to the person to their right . . .
When the signal goes up, follow the appropriate steps for refocusing.
Find your work in your folder
(There will be work in there)
Speak to one of us on the way in
Complete the daily warm-up
Ask someone at your table for notes from the days missed
Copy notes into your notebook/binder
If there is still time, begin reading, or conference with a teacher
This is important
You can do it!
We won't give up on you
After you finish your warm up, begin reading
Read quietly until the timer goes off
We will play light instrumental music in the background
Jot down inner conversation on your reading log
You may only abondon a book once per quarter
Choose a book that's "Just Right"
Silent Sustained Reading/Self Selected Reaidng
Warm Up=
Once you take you seat
A Warm Up is on the board - Complete it in your notebook
“I already explained it to you twice!” she cried out in exasperation.

What do you think exasperation means? Explain or highlight key words.
Vocabulary, Grammar, or Open Response
Turn and Talk is a great way to share what we're thinking . . .
We will give you a topic or question to talk about

Your will to someone next to you

Then about the topic or questions

Then they will respond with their thoughts
TURN
TALK
Active Listening
Accountable Talk
We will have written homework 2 times per week
Tuesday and Thursdays
Every Night . . .
This is due the NEXT DAY
HW
Assigned
Placed in
FOLDER
(completed)
D
O

Y
O
U
R

B
E
S
T
D
O

Y
O
U
R

B
E
S
T
DO YOUR BEST
Read for 30 Minutes
Read what you like to read
Fill out the Home Reading Log
Get it signed by your parents every week
Grading=
Librarian: hands out & collects SSR books

Timekeeper: makes sure group can finish in time

Note-taker: takes great class notes for absent students

Materials Manager: in charge of supplies & group cleanliness

Group Leader: keeps everyone on task and involved
We Need YOU
Listening
Processing
Responding
On Topic
Everyone Contributes
+
Fill in an application!
Practice =
How did you feel about the First day of School?
Facilitator Writer Timekeeper Presenters(2) Illustrator
Hold each other
ACCOUNTABLE
sometimes not
use you rubric
Mr. Russo
Writer
5 (awesome)
5 (this guy is great!)
(sometimes)
Fill in each column for every member of your group
I think that it is very important for the teacher to have rules, since we have rules as students. Teachers should be prepared and ready for class. I don't like a teacher that yells or makes fun of me either. I think it is important for a teacher to be fair above all, adn to be helpful when I have a problem or don't understand something Teachers should be responsible to show their Falcon PRIDE.
Example:
Only when you are told to move, Stay at your station, or Raise your hand, Move between stations QUIETLY
Movement:
On Task:
Focus on the work (independent or group), Good Effort
Monitor:
Your Own Behavior,
Get your work Done
Stations:
Vocabulary
Computers
READING
Research
Smart Board
Quick Write
Independent
Work Station
Turn & Talk
What do we gain from reading a lot?
What are some ways to decide if a book is a good fit for you?
Turn & Talk
Our Class Library
Treat the books with respect & care - they need to last
If returning books to a shelf, place back neatly
1)
2)
Books organized by reading level (Lexile)
Your selected book will go in group's ziploc bag
Painting with Words
Structure
Objective:
Warm-Up:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Exit Ticket:
DAY 1
Structure and Language
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 2
Tone, Setting & Mood
Tone
Objective:
Warm-Up:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 1
Writing a tone BCR
Objective:
Warm-Up:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 2
Mood and Setting
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Exit Ticket:
Closing:
DAY 3
Figurative Language & Imagery
Imagery
Objective:
Warm-Up:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 1
Imagery
Objective:
Warm-Up:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 2
Figurative Language
Objective:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
HW:
DAY 1
Theme & Style
Topic and Theme
Objective:
Warm-Up:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 1
Comparing Themes
Objective:
Warm-Up:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 2
STYLE
Objective:
Reader's Response
Focus:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Closing:
DAY 3
Lit Analysis
Welcome to Poetry
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Gallery Walk:
Closing:
DAY 1
Get your Books and beginning reading
While you are reading today
focus on
MAKING CONNECTIONS
Text
Self
World
Text
Scholars will use various poetic elements to create poems that describe images.
Big idea: How do we create images with words?
Warm Up:
Think-Write-Share:
Take 3 minutes to write everything you know about poetry. (Let’s see who can get most things down)

When your done, we will be pulling up to the front of the room.
Turn and Talk:
Take a second to talk with a partner about what you wrote down.

We’re going to ask you what your partner said, so be sure to listen carefully.
Let's look at the Unit together:
put a check on your paper next to any poetic element mentioned
let's see who has the most checks at the end
POETRY
UNIT 2
Turn and Talk:
How Many Elements of Poetry did you have?

Did you remember some once you saw them?

Where some new for you?
I do:
We do:
HW:
Choose an image from the internet, a magazine, or a photo album.

Write a poem that describes the picture.
Which poem best describes its image?

If there was no image, would the poem help you to see it in your mind?
Which poem best describes its image?

If there was no image, would the poem help you to see it in your mind?
Focus Questions:
Stand at your poem

Take 2 minutes to look at each poem

Rotate to your left.
Take a minute to look at this image.
Try to remember everything you can.
Great dance of color those shades of blue,
as sky and hill and town all share,
wind-blown highlight
that swirls in the night.

Dark and ominous in the forergound
church, castle, or other steapled staple
not touched by the light
as the small town below,
not touched by the night
as the small town below.

And pearls of light dance a dance in the night,
still, but twinkle as the moon smiles down
sleepy and dreaming in the quiet of the town.
Turn it into a Poem
Colors
Shade of Blue
the Town
The Sky
twinkling
stars
pearls of light
Smiling
Swirling
Dancing
Wind
-Blown
Peaceful
sleeping
Huge black castle?
small town
in the background
Write down or list some phrases and words that help describe your picture:
FIRST
THEN
THEN
1.
2.
3.
Great dance of color those shades of blue,
as sky and hill and town all share,
wind-blown highlight
that swirls in the night.

Dark and ominous in the forergound
church, castle, or other steapled staple
not touched by the light
as the small town below,
not touched by the night
as the small town below.

And pearls of light dance a dance in the night,
still, but twinkle as the moon smiles down
sleepy and dreaming in the quiet of the town.
COMPARE:
4.
Choose one of the images on the page, and describe


as many different ways as possible
Turn to page 601
3 mins.
If you chose . . .
Go this way
Go this way
Form groups of 3-4 people
-Work to create a group poem that best describes the image.

-Complete it on chart paper

-Place you initials next to the line that you are contributing to.
Take your Work!
Lines
Stanzas
Rhyme
Rhyme Scheme
Onomatopoeia
alliteration
assonance
Meter
TE + BK = I
BIG IDEAS
SWAG
simile
metaphor
personification
idioms
Color - Feeling - Picture
We will analyze the author’s use of structural features in order to determine author’s intention.
Big idea: Why did the author choose to use rhymes, stanzas, lines, and repetition that way?
Structure
The way a poem is organized, looking at:
lines & stanzas
refrain: a line or phrase that is repeated in a poem
rhyme scheme: a pattern of rhyming
What happens to a dream deferred?
Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore -
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over -
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?
Harlem (a Dream Deferred)
by Langston Hughes
Turn & Talk
about a dream or goal of yours. How would you feel if you were never able to achieve it?
Some people shoot up tall.
Some hardly leave the ground at all.
yet—people equal. Equal.

One person will aim at a star.
For another, a hilltop is too far.
yet—people equal. Equal.

Some people get on with their show.
Others never get on the go.
yet—people equal. Equal.
People Equal
by James Barry
Step 1- Look at the title & make a prediction
Step 2- Read the poem
Step 3- Make inferences about the meaning
Step 4- What do you notice about the
structure (lines, stanzas, rhyming,
and/or repetition?)
Step 5- Explain why you think the author
chose that structure: how does it
connect to the meaning?
Use the Steps with "Mating Season"

Predict using the title "People Equal" - what will the poem be about?
One person will aim at a star. A
For another, a hilltop is too far. A
yet—people equal. Equal. B
Turn & Talk
Homework:
Write a two-line stanza couplet poem between two objects that have a relationship.
Ex - A fork and spoon, ice cream and cake, peanut butter and jelly, ball and glove, etc.
In the poem "Mating Season," why does Gary Soto structure his poem in 2 line stanzas (couplets)?
deferred (adj.)- set aside
fester (v.)- to become infected
Get your SSR book & begin reading silenetly
One person will aim at a star.
For another, a hilltop is too far.
Summarize
and
Synthesize
Reader's Response:
Tell about what you read in your own words.
Think - Write - Share:
Have you ever said something but meant something else?

What are some examples of times we do not say what we mean?
Scholars will be able to determine a poem’s meaning by analyzing language and word choice.
Big Idea: What is the poet trying to say?
How can we tell what a poem means?
SHARE:
Point to your partner
Share out what you wrote about saying one thing and meaning another
Notes for 10/12:
Language Choice
Title:
Literal vs. Figurative
Words that mean exactly what they say
-Denotation-
Language that Changes the usual meaing of words
-Connotation-
Example:
How do we decide when a poet is using literal or figurative language?
TE + BK = I
One person will aim at a star.
For another, a hilltop is too far.
+
What is our background knowledge about stars?

What does is mean if someone is reaching for the stars?
=
Reaching for the stars means that you have big goals and dreams, and try to do more that your capable of.

So the poet is saying that some people have big goals and try their hardest to reach them, but others won't even try a simple task that is in front of them like climbing a hill.
literal images
Bring this with you and a paper for notes when you pull-up
Back to your seats:
You need a copy of "Mating Season"
Your Notebook and a Pen
Before we read:

Look at the structure:
What jumps out about the structure or look of this poem?
Couplets:
Two lined Stanzas
She said . . .
He said . . .
Lines 1-11:
Based on word choice, what do we notice in the first 11 lines?

What differences are there between what “She said” and what “He said”?
To the End:
Compare what the girl is saying and how the boy is responding to her?

What do we notice about his responses?
Last Stanza:
Quick Write
What can we say about the structure of the poem?

Why did Gary Soto choose to write in couplets?

How does that relate to the meaning of the poem?
You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I'll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
'Cause I walk like I've got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I'll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don't you take it awful hard
'Cause I laugh like I've got gold mines
Diggin' in my own back yard.

You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I'll rise.
Still I Rise
by Maya Angelou
Before we read:

Look at the poem, what do we notice about the lines, stanzas, and rhyme/rhyme scheme?
-4 line Stanzas

-abcb Rhyme Scheme
Structure:
"Mating Season Quick Write"
Stanza 1:
Stanza 2:
Stanza 3:
List words or phrases jump out at you as important.

What is your Background Knowledge about these words.
In the first two lines, the poet most likely means:

a. The speaker does not like history

b. People have not been telling the truth about the speaker

c. The speaker likes lemons and dancing

d. The speaker likes to write about history
Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.
What is your BK about countries that have a lot of oil?
Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.
These lines most likely mean that:

a. The speaker has a messy living room

b. The speaker walks funny

c. The speaker acts like she is rich and important even if she is not

d. The speaker loves the smell of oil in the morning.
Find the important words and comparisons:

What do all the comparisons have in common?
Think - Write - Share:
Why does the speaker compare herself to the moon, sun, and tides?
Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.




Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don't you take it awful hard
'Cause I laugh like I've got gold mines
Diggin' in my own back yard.




You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I'll rise.
Let's Look at the last 3 Stanzas:
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.
1. Summarize these lines using your own words.
2. If she laughs like she has gold mines in her back yard, what do you think the word “haughtiness” means?
3. An important idea in the last stanza is:

a. The speaker hates everybody

b. The speaker wants to be shot, cut, and killed

c. The speaker likes to be made fun of.

d. The speaker will not be offended by what people say or do to her.
What do the first three lines have in common?

What happens if you try to shoot, kill, or cut, air?

Why is the poet comparing herself to air in this stanza?
4. Still I Rise - QW
Review:
1. The speaker is beaten down and tired, lived a hard life. The shoulders bear the burden of tearful memories.

2. Haughtiness - the speaker is acting snobby, like she's rich

3. d. - the speaker will rise no matter what people say or do

4. QW: The first three lines all talk about assaulting the speaker by cutting, shooting, or killing. She remain like air, and bullets or knives just pass through air. So even though people are acting hateful towards her, she continues to rise above their actions.
HW:
Write a poem that is structured with 2 line stanzas (couplets). Compare two things that are related somehow.
Language & Inferring
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 1
Summarize
and
Synthesize
Reader's Response:
Tell about what you read in your own words.
Think - Write - Share:
Give an example of someone who has become very successful and/or accomplished their dreams. What did he or she do to become so successful?
Scholars will be able to infer a poem's meaning by analyzing language and word choice.
Big Idea: What is the poet trying to say?
What words did the poet use to express his/her message?
SHARE:
Point to your partner
Share out what you wrote about someone who is very successful
Bring this with you and a paper for notes when you pull-up
Back to your seats:
Get out notebook paper & a pen
The Pool Players.
Seven at the Golden Shovel.

We real cool. We
Left school. We

Lurk late. We
Strike straight. We

Sing sin. We
Thin gin. We

Jazz June. We
Die soon.
We Real Cool
by Gwendolyn Brooks
Stanza 2:
Stanzas 3-4:
Think-Write-Share:
What is your background knowledge about kids who drop out of school or stay out late? What can you infer about the speakers of the poem?
“We sing sin. We thin gin. We Jazz June. We die soon.”
Think-Write-Share: What do the speakers mean by “sing sin?” Why might they die soon?
It all started with a dream,
I wanted to be Run–D.M.C
The Lord put the blessing upon the MC
That's when I knew my flows would overflow to the rim


Red carpet magic, taking pictures with the president
Total for health care, my music is the medicine
My name holds weight, I am never hesitant
Different state resident, this is hood elegance


Ohh, in the sky we'll find the light
Ohh, until high we'll shine at night
Now we in the skies, blue skies
And we going higher, that's right
Blue Sky
by: Common
TE + BK = I
He wanted to be Run-D.M.C.
Old school hip hop, important to history of music
Common had big musical aspirations
TE + BK = I
He's "taking pictures with the president"
Accomplished people get to meet the president
Common has become successful and accomplished
“We real cool. We Left school. We lurk late.”
What can we
infer about the
speakers of the poem?
1 - Nobody likes them and they
don't care

2 - They think they're great but live
a dangerous lifestyle

3 - They are depressed and want
to kill themselves
Look at "The Quiet Evenings Here"
Use whiteboards to answer mulitple choice questions
What inference can you make about the personality of the poem’s speakers?

A) They are calm and quiet
B) They are excitable and loud
C) They are shy and scared
D) They are always happy
Where would the speakers choose to spend most of their time?

A) At the movies
B) At the speedway
C) At the mall
D) At their own home
According to the speaker, what kind of person would most likely enjoy a speedway?

A) Someone who likes quiet activities
B) Someone who enjoys the outdoors
C) Someone who is energetic and loud
D) Someone who is bored and lonely

What kind of activity would the speaker enjoy most?

A) Listening to a clock
B) Going to the movies
C) Going to a rock concert
D) Reading by a fireplace
Quick Write
How would you describe the speakers of the poem? Use text evidence and background knowledge to explain your answer.
Sound Elements
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
DAY 1
Activate and Connect
Reader's Response:
Make a Connection using your Background Knowledge.
Guess the Sound Element
I think this means:

My own example:
Scholars will examine and articulate the differences between elements of sound used in poetry.
Big Idea: What are sound elements? How and why do poets use them?
Sound Elements
Review & Writing Poetry
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Poetry Reading!
Closing:
DAY 1
Activate & Connect
Reader's Response:
Try to make a connection to your own experiences or something that you’ve read or seen.
1) Scholars will infer meaning from poetry by analyzing language and structure.

2) Scholars will create their own poems utilizing elements of figurative language and structure.
Back to your seats:
Get out notebook paper & a pen
Some folks go to movies
funshots, chases, screams of fear
we've never been that kind of folks.

Grandma rockin'
clock tick-tockin'
we'd rather stay right here

Some folks love the speedway
roarin' engines
grindin' gears
we've never been that kind of folks
we'd rather stay right here.

Sister hummin'
Grandpa strummin'
we'd rather stay right here.

We've just always been the sort who like the tranquil
soothing
peaceful
quiet evenings here.
The Quiet Evenings Here
by: Paul Fleishman
Quick Write
How would you describe the speakers of the poem? Use text evidence and background knowledge to explain your answer.
What inference can you make about the personality of the poem’s speakers?

A) They are calm and quiet
B) They are excitable and loud
C) They are shy and scared
D) They are always happy
Where would the speakers choose to spend most of their time?

A) At the movies
B) At the speedway
C) At the mall
D) At their own home
According to the speaker, what kind of person would most likely enjoy a speedway?

A) Someone who likes quiet activities
B) Someone who enjoys the outdoors
C) Someone who is energetic and loud
D) Someone who is bored and lonely

What kind of activity would the speaker enjoy most?

A) Listening to a clock
B) Going to the movies
C) Going to a rock concert
D) Reading by a fireplace
1)
2)
3)
4)

No talking
Try your best
Poetry Writing Stations
Gallery Walk: One minute at each station to decide which one you want to write
start with a four line stanza
this is just an example
of what it will look like
do not copy my example

then go down to just three lines
in the next stanza so that it
looks something like this

your third stanza will be
only two lines (called a couplet)

last stanza is one
Running out of Time
This poem should be written in tercets
That means three-line stanzas
The last line should be a refrain

The topic: something you're passionate about
Something that you love and work hard for
The last line should be a refrain

It could be music, sports, food, anything
The last line should be a refrain
Something You're Passionate About
This poem will be like "Still I Rise"
Each stanza should be four lines long
It might be challenging to use rhymes
But will end up more like a song

You have to write about something you hate
Something that really gets you mad
Something that always gets you "guh"
Maybe it's racism, maybe just a pop-up ad
Something That Makes You Mad
This poem will be in couplets
Which means two line stanzas

It should be about school - pros on one line
and things you dislike on the second line

It doesn't have to rhyme
But if you want to, go ahead

Try to write at least
Five stanzas with longer lines
Pros and Cons About School
Any volunteers that want to share their work?
Alliteration
Alliteration
Assonance
Onomatopoeia
Repetition
repetition of beginning sounds in a series of words.
The sweet smell of success
Words that sound like the noises they name.
repetition of VOWEL sounds in a series of words.
Fleet feet sweep by sleeping geese
repeating a word, phrase or whole line within a poem
I looked upon the rotting sea,
And drew my eyes away;
I looked upon the rotting deck,
And there the dead men lay.

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
`'Tis some visitor,' I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door -
Only this, and nothing more.'
Turn & Talk
What did you think of the song? What sound element was used most? What did the artist use it for?
The Raven
by: Edgar Allan Poe

List three examples of sound elements found here
What feeling do you think the author is trying to create?
Independent work:
FAST
testing
Vocab practice
(on power point)
Sound Elements
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Find your Group:
DAY 2
Questioning
Reader's Response:
Record and questions you have.

Focus on Think Questions that deepen your understanding.
Scholars will be able to examine and explain a poet’s use of sound elements.
Big Question: Why does the poet include these sound elements in the poem? How do they add to the meaning of the poem?
Sound Elements
Alliteration
Assonance
Onomatopoeia
Repetition
The sweet smell of success
Fleet feet sweep by sleeping geese
I looked upon the rotting sea,
And drew my eyes away;
I looked upon the rotting deck,
And there the dead men lay.

Turn & Talk
What did you think of the song? What sound element was used most? What did the artist use it for?
They are on Purpose
The Pool Players.
Seven at the Golden Shovel.

We real cool. We
Left school. We

Lurk late. We
Strike straight. We

Sing sin. We
Thin gin. We

Jazz June. We
Die soon.
We Real Cool
by Gwendolyn Brooks
1. Look at the structure of the poem
2. Identify Sound Elements of the poem
3. Notice important words and language
4. Make inferences to explain meaning
5. Make connections between the sound elements and the meaning behind the poem
Analysis
The assonance and rhyme used with the "i" sound in "thin gin" and "sing sin," help create a jazzy rhythm in the poem. This feeling mimics the jazzy quality depicted in the setting of the poem. It adds the feeling of “coolness” which the speakers of the poem are trying to show. The repetition of the word "We" at the end of the lines also places an emphasis on the speakers of the poem, and the fact that they are talking about themselves. It's almost as if they are trying to convince the readers that they are as cool as they say.
Teach me how to dougie . . .
Take out the poem in your folder
Let's get ready to ANALYZE
Analysis
Write your name on your poem:
.
What can you say about the lines? stanzas? rhyme shceme?
Alliteration
Assonance
Repetition
Onomatopoeia
important words/
phrases,
example of
FIGURATIVE
LANGUAGE
What is the poet saying?

What are the important ideas?
How does the use of sound contribute to the meaning and/or style of the poem?
Underline any
Circle
(you can write on this poem)
TE + BK = I
Why does it sound that way?
Write this on the bottom or back of your poem.
1. Look at the structure of the poem



2. Identify Sound Elements of the poem



3. Notice important words and language



4. Make inferences to explain meaning


5. Make connections between the sound elements and the meaning behind the poem
All the people with the same poem get together
Go through the 5 steps with your group

Each person must present one step to the class

Use the Smart Board to teach your poem

Follow the Criteria for success (on your table)
Class will grade the presentations using the Criteria for Success
Share Out:
For each Group:
Write the Poem Title
Number 1-5 for each Criteria of sucess

Rate each criteira: Met or Not Met

Rate the presentation: 1-5 (5 is the best)

Answer the question:

How does the sound contribute to the poem's style or meaning?
Record and questions you have.

Focus on Think Questions that deepen your understanding.
Reader's Response -
SSR
Scholars will be able to analyze and explain an author’s use of imagery in a poem.
Big Question: How do the images in the poem help us understand the meaning?
Think-Write-Share
Describe this image.

What do you SEE?
Imagery
-language that creates a scene or mental picture

-descriptions that connect to the reader's senses

-Authors use imagery to help the reader visualize

-The reader uses the imagery to make inferences and connections using bockground knowledge
... the reader hear, smell, touch, or picture the scene
... the author create an experience for you, so you can
connect to the meaning of the poem better
Imagery helps...


When I get to be a composer
I’m gonna write me some music about
Daybreak in Alabama
And I’m gonna put the purtiest songs in it
Rising out of the ground like a swamp mist
And falling out of heaven like soft dew.
I’m gonna put some tall tall trees in it
And the scent of pine needles
And the smell of red clay after rain
And long red necks
And poppy colored faces
And big brown arms
And the field daisy eyes
Of black and white black white black people
And I’m gonna put white hands
And black hands and brown and yellow hands
And red clay earth hands in it
Touching everybody with kind fingers
And touching each other natural as dew
In that dawn of music when I
Get to be a composer
And write about daybreak
In Alabama.
Daybreak in Alabama
by: Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes uses the colorful sights and smells of nature - morning dew, a field of daisies, the scent of pine needles - to paint a picture of how all these different things exist beautifully together in nature. He uses this pleasant imagery to show how nice it would be if people of all races (like the "white people black people" he mentions) would live together in harmony. Different people should be able to exist together peacefully too, "as natural as dew."
TONE
Scholars will be able to analyze a poem to explain the speaker’s TONE (how the speaker feels about the subject in a poem).
Big Idea: What is the speaker’s attitude or feeling towards the subject?
Activate
and
Connect
SSR:
Try to make a connection to your own experiences or something that you’ve read or seen.
How do you feel about school?

What words would you use to describe your feelings?
Think–Write-Share:
SHARE:
Point to your partner
What words did you use to describe how you feel about school?
Point to your Partner:
Who are you Sharing With?
How did you describe this image?
SHARE:
NOTES:
EX.
Structure?

Sound Elements?

Important Words?

Imagery Used?
MEANING
Anzlyze This . . .
How does the imagery used in "Daybreak in Alabama" help us better understand an important idea in the poem?
How does the imagery used in "Daybreak in Alabama" help us better understand an important idea in the poem?
*Quote three clear examples of imagery from the poem

*Draw a picture for each text example

*Answer:
“Ham N’ Eggs”
POSTER
How does the food imagery relate to the speaker's feelings about being at his grandmother's house?
Criteria for Success:
Bring your answer and a paper for notes to Pull-Up
How does L. Hughes use imagery to show what happens to a dream deferred? Use text evidence from the poem to explain your answer.
Turn you Paper Over to
"A Dream Deferred"
Mark up the poem to analyze:
*Notes about structure and Sound
*Underline Important Words or Phrases
*Circle examples of Imagery
Answer on your Paper:
Big Idea:
How do the images in a poem help us understand the author’s message?
Remeber:
The imagery is on Purpose

The imagery helps us make inferences about the meaning
HW:
Finish the "A Dream Deferred"
Bring this, the Tone Word Bank, and a paper for notes when we Pull Up
Notes:
the speaker’s attitude towards his/her subject.

Words and Language choice help us figure out the tone of a poem.

Tone is described with “feeling” words
TONE
I ask them to take a poem
and hold it up to the light
like a color slide

or press an ear against its hive.

I say drop a mouse into a poem
and watch him probe his way out,

or walk inside the poem's room
and feel the walls for a light switch.

I want them to waterski
across the surface of a poem
waving at the author's name on the shore.

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means.
Introduction to Poetry
by Billy Collins
In lines 1-11:
How does the speaker feel that poetry should be read?
1
10
5
15
In lines 12-16:
What is the speaker's attitude about the way most people read poetry?
Back to your seats
and Make this Chart:
T. E.
Tone Words
Explanation
Groups:
T. E.
Tone Words
Explanation
Make a New Chart for your poem:
Solo:
T. E.
Tone Words
Explanation
Focus Questions:
"Poetry":



"Grandmother":



Winter Poem":
What is the speaker’s attitude about poetry?
How does the speaker feel about the Grandmother in this poem?
What is the speaker’s feelings about winter?
Review:
What does “tone” mean?
How can we determine a speaker’s tone?
the speaker’s attitude towards his/her subject.

Words and Language choice help us figure out the tone of a poem.

Tone is described with “feeling” words
Tone is
Activate
and
Connect
SSR:
Try to make a connection to your own experiences or something that you’ve read or seen.
Scholars will be able to analyze and explain the speaker’s tone in a poem using text evidence
Big Idea: What is the speaker’s attitude or feeling towards the subject?
Turn & Talk
What do you know about BCRs?
What are they? How are they scored?
What do you need to do to get a good score?
I ask them to take a poem
and hold it up to the light
like a color slide

or press an ear against its hive.

I say drop a mouse into a poem
and watch him probe his way out,

or walk inside the poem's room
and feel the walls for a light switch.

I want them to waterski
across the surface of a poem
waving at the author's name on the shore.

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means.
Introduction to Poetry
by Billy Collins
1
10
5
15
The speaker feels appreciative and joyful about reading poetry. He recommends holding poetry up to a light, walking inside of it, "feeling it," or even having fun waterskiing arcoss it. These words are fun and playful, and only someone who feels joy about reading poetry would want to have so much fun exploring it. By listing all the ways you can enjoy poems, you can tell the author appreciates exploring them.
Scholars will be able to analyze and explain an author’s use of imagery in a poem.
Big Question: How do the images in the poem help us understand the meaning?
Record and questions you have.

Focus on Think Questions that deepen your understanding.
Reader's Response -
SSR
*Quote three clear examples of imagery from the poem

*Draw a picture for each text example

*Answer:
“Ham N’ Eggs” POSTER
Criteria for Success:
How does the food imagery
relate to the the speaker's feelings
about being at grandma's house?
Harlem (A Dream Deferred)

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore—
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over—
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?
The speaker in "Ham n' Eggs" uses food imagery to show how comfortable he is at grandma's house. The sights, smells and sounds of food are mostly pleasant and cozy: eggs frying, nice red beets, the smell of ham in the air. The speaker's grandmother must care about him to make such a large meal. The sights, smell, and sounds of cooking remind the reader of the comforts of home and family.
Pull-Up

your imagery notes (notebook paper)
your HW: "Dream Deferred" handout
a pen or pencil
Bring:
1 - Answer the question
2 - Use text evidence to
support your answer
3 - Explain your text evidence
& extend
How does L. Hughes use imagery to show what happens to a dream deferred? Use text evidence from the poem to explain your answer
Share Out
Does the answer have
1, 2 and 3?
1 - Answer
2 - Text Evidence
3 - Explanation
Tone Question: How does the speaker feel about reading poetry? Use text evidence to support your response.
1 - Answer the Question
2 - Use text evidence
3 - Explain & Extend
The speaker feels appreciative and joyful about reading poetry
He recommends holding poetry up to a light, walking inside of it, "feeling it," or even having fun waterskiing across it.




These words are fun and playful, and only someone who feels joy about reading poetry would want to have so much fun exploring it. By listing all the ways you can enjoy poems, you can tell the author appreciates exploring them.
1 - Answer the Question
2 - Use text evidence that supports your answer
3 - Explain & extend
Look at the last two stanzas of "Introduction to Poetry." What is the speaker's attitude about the way most people read poetry? Use text evidence from the poem to support your answer.
What is this asking us to do? What do we need to have a good answer?
But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means
Work with a partner / in groups to answer "Introduction to Poetry" BCR

Use your graphic organziers from yesterday

Label your answer with 1, 2 and 3
Use the poem in your folder to answer the BCR on your own
"Grandmother"
"Poetry" or
"Winter Poem"
Label your answer using 1-2-3
Swap papers with a partner & score their BCR
Inference Skills
Use your B. K. to make an inference about what is going to happen in your book or how the book might apply to your life
1. When Mr. Russo writes “Good Effort” on your work, how does that make you feel? What about when he writes “You Can do Better?”

2. As the first quarter ends, make a list of things you did right, and things that you want to change in the second quarter.
Think–Write-Share:
Bring this, the Tone Word Bank, and a paper for notes when we Pull Up
SHARE:
Point to your partner
How do you feel when you see the words "Good Effort" or "You can do Better?"
Scholars will be able to identify the mood of a poem, and describe how word choice and setting contribute to mood.
Big Question: What emotion is the poet trying to evoke in the reader?
verb: To call up or produce
House Keeping:
Grades:


Homework:


Effort:


Respect:
Are directly related to EFFORT put in to WORK.
NO Excuses in Q2. No Late Work after 2 Weeks.

Incomplete HW Killed most people with D and E's
We will not grade anything more than 2 weeks late
It goes down one grade for each week

The effort during instruction and work period needs to increase. Fooling around needs to decrease

To the teachers and each other needs to improve.
Worry about yourself, not about joning or bullying.
You know our expectations
LIVE UP TO THEM - RISE TO THE CHALLANGE
MOOD and SETTING
NOTES:
Mood: The feeling that the author wants to create for the reader.

Setting: The time and location where a poem or story takes place.

Imagery, Sound Elements, and Figurative Language can help us determine the mood of a poem.

The Setting purposely creates a mood in a poem or story.
While you watch this video, think about the lyrics of the song, and how Jay Z uses NY to create a mood.
FOCUS:
Yea I'm out that Brooklyn,
now I'm down in TriBeCa
right next to Deniro,
but I'll be hood forever
I'm the new Sinatra,
and... since I made it here
I can make it anywhere,
In New York,
concrete jungle where dreams are made of
There's nothin' you can't do
Now you're in New York
These streets will make you feel brand new
Big lights will inspire you
Let's hear it for New York, New York, New York
refrain
MOOD:
NYC is a huge place where people go to get their big break, or become famous. This song is paying a tribute to the the different neighborhoods (Bedford, Brooklyn, TriBeca, Harlem) in the city, as well as referring to a lot of the famous people who are associated with NYC (DiNero, Sinatra). It also notes NYC's famous landmarks and sports teams. All of these assciations are larger than life, and help to create an insprirational and nostalgic mood for the reader. The reader is remembering all of the famous things that make NY great, and inspire people to go there in the first place. It is a place where dreams can come true.
Inspirational?
Nostalgic?
Let's Practice
Number from 1-6 on your paper
It's close to midnight
something evil's lurkin' from the dark
under moonlight
You see a sight that almost stops your heart
You try to scream
But terror takes the sound before you make it
You start to freeze
As terror looks you right between your eyes
You're paralyzed
1
I WANDERED lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.
2
"Thriller" - Michael Jackson
"I wandered lonely as a cloud"
- William Wordsworth
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
" 'Tis some visitor," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door;
Only this, and nothing more."
3
"The Raven" - Edgar Allen Poe
His palms are sweaty, knees weak,
arms are heavy
There's vomit on his sweater already,
mom's spaghetti
He's nervous, but on the surface
he looks calm and ready to drop bombs,
4
"Lose Yourself" - Eminem
Droning a drowsy syncopated tune,
Rocking back and forth to a mellow croon, I heard a Negro play.
Down on Lenox Avenue the other night
By the pale dull pallor of an old gas light
He did a lazy sway . . .
He did a lazy sway . . .
To the tune o' those Weary Blues.
5
"The Weary Blues"
- Langston Hughes
You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I'll rise.
6
"Still I Rise"
- Maya Angelou
a word to describe the mood.

text evidence that made you choose that word.

a complete definition of Setting and Mood on the back of the card.
Criteria for Success:
An answer must include . . .
HW:
Select 2 words you do not know from your Tone and Mood Bank.

Create a foldable (Hotdog Style) with:

the word on the outside

on the inside
the definition
a picture
a sentence to help us understand

Use a dictionary, a parent, or the internet if you need more help.
down
in the corner
my book and i
traveling
over the project
walls
so the world
is more than this
elevator
stuck between
floors again
and home
is a corner
where i crouch
safe
reading waiting
to start moving
up
What is the Mood of this poem?
Define Setting and Mood
On the Back
On your Index Card:
The Elevator
The mood is best described as:

a.

b.

c.

d.
exciting

fearful

desperate

humorous
The mood is best described as:

a.

b.

c.

d.
lethargic

candid

optimistic

melancholy
Which line is LEAST helpful in understanding the setting?

a.

b.

c.

d.
"Once upon a midnight dreary"

"While I nodded nearly napping"

"gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door"

"Only this, and nothing more"
What mood is created in these lines?
urgent
anxious
excited determined
Acceptable answers:
The setting in these lines help to create a mood that is . . .
relaxed
lethargic
calm
sympathetic
Write down 2 mood words created by these lines
Mood and Setting
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work
Closing:
DAY 4
Activate
and
Connect
Connect to something you've alrady read or seen, something you know about, or something you've experienced.
Scholars will be able to identify the mood of a poem, and describe how word choice and setting contribute to mood.
Big Question: What emotion is the poet trying to evoke in the reader?
verb: To call up or produce
Pull Up with your Index card and your BCR Paper
NOTES:
Mood: The feeling that the author wants to create for the reader.

Setting: The time and location where a poem or story takes place.

Imagery, Sound Elements, and Figurative Language can help us determine the mood of a poem.

The Setting purposely creates a mood in a poem or story.
Look at you Index Cards
a marked up question

an answer, text evidence and extension (inference)

a marked up answer (1-2-3)
Criteria for Success:
A successful BCR must include . . .
Scholars will be able to identify the mood of a poem, and describe how word choice and setting contribute to mood.
Back to your seats to work on your own BCR:
FOLDER:
Take out:
"Winter Garden"
and
"Spring Garden"
Class Map
Library
SMART Board
(at the board)
Read through the poems:
-Mark them up to help you determine what the mood is. (Consider the imagery and setting)

-Decide on a mood word
-Explain your thinking
Use you notes on Mood and Setting
down
in the corner
my book and i
traveling
over the project
walls
so the world
is more than this
elevator
stuck between
floors again
and home
is a corner
where i crouch
safe
reading waiting
to start moving
up
Mark up your poem as I do:
We are looking for details of setting and word choice to help us determine the mood.
The Elevator
Use the work you did with

"Winter Garden"
and
"Spring Garden"
OBJECTIVE:
Remeber:
Mood: The feeling that the author wants to create for the reader.

Setting: The time and location where a poem or story takes place.

Imagery, Sound Elements, and Figurative Language can help us determine the mood of a poem.

The Setting purposely creates a mood in a poem or story.
SSR
Reader's Response: write one thing you learned (a fact, something new about a character, etc.)
Scholars will be able to analyze figurative language to determine a poem’s meaning
Big Question: What does the poet ACTUALLY mean?
Fill in the blank with an animal that would fit the description:

She’s as sneaky as a ________
He’s loud like a _________
She moves as slowly as a _________
Think - Write - Share
SHARE:
Point to your partner
What animals did you choose?

She’s as sneaky as a ________
He’s loud like a _________
She moves as slowly as a _________
Figurative Language
Figurative language goes beyond the literal meaning of words to create a deeper meaning.
Figurative Language Devices
Simile:
comparing two things using "like" or "as"
Ex: She is as slow as a turtle
Metaphor:
comparing two things WITHOUT using "like" or "as"
Ex: His lightening voice rumbled over us
Personification:
giving human-like qualities to non-human objects
Ex: The kite danced in the wind
Authors use these devices to describe things in a new, creative way
Hope is the thing with feathers / that perches in the soul
And sings the tune without the words / And never stops at all
This metaphor is used to show how:

A) Hope is the name of the speaker's pet bird
B) People hold on to hope in their hearts
C) There is no hope left in the world
The ginko tree forces its way through gray concrete
like a city child, it grows up in the street
This simile is used to show how:

A) Rough and tough a ginkgo tree is
B) Ginkgo trees grow in concrete
C) The Ginkgo is turning into a human
Let the rain kiss you / let the rain sing you a lullaby.
This personification is used to show how:

A) It's very romantic when it rains
B) Rain is comforting, like a mother
C) Raindrops are good at kissing and singing
I say frighten me
She shouts thunder, flashes lightening
This metaphor best describes how:

A) Her mom is caught in a rainstorm
B) Her mom has thunder bolts coming out of her mouth
C) Her mom can be very loud and flashy
Summer grass aches and whispers; it calls out for rain
This personification best describes how:

A) it hasn't rained on the grass in a while
B) the grass is talking to the sky
C) how it's about to start raining
What happens to a dream deferred?
Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun?
This simile best describes how:

A) your dream was once a grape
B) your dream might shrivel up and change
C) your dream might still keep going
Write the letter of the correct answer on your white board
ON YOUR INDEX CARD -
Explain the difference between people who make your thoughts "like leaves all brown and dried," and people who make your "thoughts as thick as fireflies."
Write a poem describing yourself or someone you know.
Poem must:
use at least 4 fig. language devices
be at least 12 lines long
Mood Do's and Don'ts
The speaker feels sad or lonely

It says "down on the corner" so the mood is scared

he's worried because he does not know what is going to happen

friendly
MOOD
Is Not
about the speaker

about the characters

about the meaning of the poem
MOOD
Is
about the feeling of the poem

how the poet wants you to feel

helps us understand the poem
Not Mood,
Not Yet
The mood is depressed but prepared to do something better

The mood is determined

The mood is sad because she is down, but waiting to move up

The mood is depressed because she is stuck between two feelings
Mood,
getting there
Quick Write
Figurative Language
Objective:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 2
SSR
Reader's Response: write one thing you learned (a fact, something new about a character, etc.)
Scholars will be able to analyze figurative language to determine a poem’s meaning
Big Question: What does the poet ACTUALLY mean?
Red = pull up front
1) Underline the metaphors

2) What would it mean for life to be a "broken-winged bird that cannot fly? Write your answer on the poem.

3) How could life be like a frozen, barren field?
BCR on the back of your handout
How does Langston Hughes use figurative language to explain what happens when you let go of your dreams?
Handout -
"Dreams" poem
Blue or
Green
= back three tables
Everyone needs a piece of paper + pen/pencil
Willow
Ginkgo
etching
fine-lined

soprano
delicate
crude sketch
not worthy

chorus
everyone
Quick Write
What are the differences between a willow and a ginkgo? How does the poet use figurative language to show these differences?
Some People
by Rachel Field

Isn’t it strange some people
make you feel so tired inside,
Your thoughts begin to shrivel up
like leaves all brown and dried!

But when you’re with some other ones,
it’s stranger still to find
Your thoughts as thick as fireflies
all shiny in your mind!

Brown &
Dried Leaves
Thick &
Shiny Fireflies
lifeless
bright
How are people from stanza 1
different from people in stanza 2?
Poetic Elements Combined
Objective:
SSR:
Lesson:
Work Period:
DAY 1
Reader's Response -

If you are reading fiction, what
mood
does the author create for the readers?
Scholars will be able to synthesize their knowledge of poetic elements to analyze a poem for its meaning.
Big Question: How do poets use structure, sound, imagery, figurative language, mood and tone to show meaning?
Let's break it down . . .
Turn to page 634
Let's get ready to ANALYZE
"Speech to the Young"
Analysis
Write the letter of your answer on your whiteboard
1. Structure: How many stanzas does it have?
Are the lines long or short?

2. Sound Elements:
Are there any examples of alliteration or onomatopoeia? List any repeating words or phrases

3. Imagery: List any phrases that paint a picture in your mind or appeal to the senses

4. Tone: What is the speaker’s feeling about life?

5. Mood: How does the poem make the reader feel?

6. Figurative language: Throughout the poem, the speaker compares her life to what? Is this a simile, metaphor, or personification?
Closing:
On the same page - write "Poem Meaning"
SHARE:
Point to your partner
What animals did you choose?

She’s as sneaky as a ________
He’s loud like a _________
She moves as slowly as a _________
SHARE:
Point to your partner
What poetic element do you like or understand best? What do you still have trouble with? Why do you think that is?
Think-Write-Share
What poetic element do you like or understand best? What do you still have trouble with? Why?
mood tone
imagery
structure
figurative language
sound devices
inferring
Poetic elements don't exist in isolation
Poets combine them in order to get their meaning across
Say to them,
say to the down-keepers,
the sun-slappers,
the self-soilers,
the harmony-hushers,
"Even if you are not ready for day
it cannot always be night."
You will be right.
For that is the hard home-run.

Live not for battles won.
Live not for the-end-of-the-song.
Live in the along.
Speech to the Young,
Speech to the Progress Toward
by: Gwendolyn Brooks

Using Poetic Elements to Understand Meaning
Lines 3-4: "sun-slappers" and "self-soilers" are examples of which sound device?
A) Onomatopoeia
B) Alliteration
C) Assonance
D) Repetition
How many lines does the second stanza have?
A) Nine
B) Two
C) Three
D) There are no lines
The speaker says that her advice is a "home run." This comparison is a:
A) simile
B) metaphor
C) personification
D) onomatopoeia
The mood of the poem is:
A) encouraging
B) frustrating
C) scary
D) joyful
The "down keepers" and "harmony hushers" she mentions are probably:
A) People who don't know how to sing
B) People who are always happy
C) People who are really shy
D) People who are are often pessemistic and worry a lot
When the speaker says "live not for the end-of-the-song," she means:
A) Live in the moment and enjoy it
B) Listen to different types of music
C) Don't be afraid to try something new
D) The song is almost over
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
Page 636 - "Mother
to Son"
Set up a page like this:

1) Structure:

2) Sound:

3) Imagery:

4) Tone:

5) Mood:

6) Figurative Language:
What is this poem about? What element helps you understand the poem the most?
SSR
Reader's Response -
record a reaction to something you read
"I can't believe..."
"Woah! I'm surprised that..."
"Reading about ____ made me
happy/angry/sad because..."
Think-Write-Share
Think of a movie that has a message or a lesson for viewers. Describe what the movie is about and what the life lesson is.
Think of a movie that has a message or a lesson for viewers. Describe what the movie is about and what the message / lesson is.
Students will be able to compare universal themes/messages in poetry.
Big Question: How might different poems communicate the same big idea?
Point to your partner!
Theme
The
topic
is the "big idea" of a poem - what it's about, in 1 or 2 words.
Ex: hope, revenge, or family

Theme
is the writer's message about the topic - usually a life lesson.
Ex: Family will always be there for you; Hope carries us through hard times.

Stories, plays, novels and poems all have themes; usually more than one
Topic:
superpowers
Theme:
with great power comes great responsibility
Topic:
friendship
Theme:
Good friends will always be there for you
Speech to the Young
Compare the themes of both "Mother to Son" and "Speech to the Young." Do you think the speakers of both poems would get along? Would they agree with each other's advice?
Quick Write
Well, son, I'll tell you:
Life for me ain't been no crystal stair.
It's had tacks in it,
And splinters,
And boards torn up,
And places with no carpet on the floor—
Bare.
But all the time
I'se been a-climbin' on,
And reachin' landin's,
And turnin' corners,
And sometimes goin' in the dark
Where there ain't been no light.
So, boy, don't you turn back.
Don't you set down on the steps.
'Cause you finds it's kinder hard.
Don't you fall now—
For I'se still goin', honey,
I'se still climbin',
And life for me ain't been no crystal stair.
Mother to Son
Langston Hughes
With a Partner
1) Re-read lines 14 - 20

2) Pick text evidence that helps you find the theme
(first column)

3) Explain the message being delivered by the poet
(second column)
p. 636
p. 634
1) Read the whole poem

2) Write the "Topic" in your graphic organizer (one or two words)

3) Pick text evidence that helps you find the theme (1st column)

4) Explain the message being delivered by the poet (2nd column)

5) Determine the theme - add to the bottom of your organizer
it is at moments after i have dreamed
of the rare entertainment of your eyes,
when (being fool to fancy) i have deemed

with your peculiar mouth my heart made wise;
at moments when the glassy darkness holds

the genuine apparition of your smile
(it was through tears always)and silence moulds
such strangeness as was mine a little while;

moments when my once more illustrious arms
are filled with fascination, when my breast
wears the intolerant brightness of your charms:

one pierced moment whiter than the rest

-turning from the tremendous lie of sleep
i watch the roses of the day grow deep.
LXXXIX

A WORD is dead
When it is said,
Some say.
I say it just
Begins to live
That day.
Emily Dickinson

Part One: Life
it is at moments after i have dreamed

by e.e. cummings
Summarize
Recap what you just read in your own words:
Non-Fiction:


Fiction:
Tell about something new that you learned


Tell about characters. setting, and what is happening.
What do you think of when you hear the word style?

If someone asked you to describe your style, what would you tell them?
Think - Write - Share
For Pull-Up:
Bring this to Share, and Something for notes
Scholars will be able to identify and describe elements of style across multiple poems.
Big Question: What makes a Langston Hughes Poem a Langston Hughes poem?
Point to your Partner:
Who are you Sharing With?
How did you define your style?
SHARE:
STYLE:
NOTES
-The way an author uses language to express ideas

-Includes word choice, structure, figurative language,
repetition, symbols, dialogue, imagery, etc�

-Strong style makes a writer recognizable
STYLE
Bring up this writing, the graphic organizer, and something for notes
Students will be able to compare universal themes/messages in poetry.
Big Question: How might different poems communicate the same big idea?
SSR
"I can't believe..."
"Woah! I'm surprised that..."
"Reading about ____ made me
happy/angry/sad because..."
Reader's Response -
record a reaction to something you read
Dreams

1 Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
That cannot fly.

5 Hold fast to dreams
For when dreams go
Life is a barren field
Frozen with snow.
Harlem (A Dream Deferred)

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore—
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over—
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?
by Langston Hughes
Don't look at just 1 or 2 lines: theme is created throughout the whole poem

EFFORT from some
"Enjoy life and don't let people bring you down."

"Don't live in the past, live in the present - and just b/c people don't support you doesn't mean you shouldn't try.

"An adult speaking to kids about respect"

"Your life is more important than other things"

The Good
To Improve
Theme is a message / lesson from the writer

Good job picking text evidence that shows the theme
Say to them,
say to the down-keepers,
the sun-slappers,
the self-soilers,
the harmony-hushers,
“Even if you are not ready for day
it cannot always be night.”
You will be right.
For that is the hard home-run.

Live not for battles won.
Live not for The-End-of-the-Song.
Live in the along.
Speech to the Young,
Speech to the Progress-Towards
Class Map
SMART Board
(at the board)
SINK
Library
Use the "Dream" poems to do the BCR (handout)

Code your BCR
1 - answer
2 - text evidence
3 - explanation / extension
Exemplars on visualizer
Folder Cleanout
Folder Binder
*New homework

*Poetry classwork/
handouts
(BCRs,organizers,
marked-up poems)
*Reader Response Log

*Think-Write-Shares

*Class notes

*Unit 1 graded work
(Reading Strategies)
We won't grade work if you don't have your folder cleaned out
Well, son, I'll tell you:
Life for me ain't been no crystal stair.
It's had tacks in it,
And splinters,
And boards torn up,
And places with no carpet on the floor—
Bare.
But all the time
I'se been a-climbin' on,
And reachin' landin's,
And turnin' corners,
And sometimes goin' in the dark
Where there ain't been no light.
So, boy, don't you turn back.
Don't you set down on the steps.
'Cause you finds it's kinder hard.
Don't you fall now—
For I'se still goin', honey,
I'se still climbin',
And life for me ain't been no crystal stair.
Mother to Son
Langston Hughes
Droning a drowsy syncopated tune,
Rocking back and forth to a mellow croon,
I heard a Negro play.
Down on Lenox Avenue the other night
By the pale dull pallor of an old gas light
He did a lazy sway . . .
He did a lazy sway . . .
To the tune o' those Weary Blues.
With his ebony hands on each ivory key
He made that poor piano moan with melody.
O Blues!
Swaying to and fro on his rickety stool
He played that sad raggy tune like a musical fool.
Sweet Blues!
Coming from a black man's soul.
O Blues!
In a deep song voice with a melancholy tone
I heard that Negro sing, that old piano moan--
"Ain't got nobody in all this world,
Ain't got nobody but ma self.
I's gwine to quit ma frownin'
And put ma troubles on the shelf."

Thump, thump, thump, went his foot on the floor.
He played a few chords then he sang some more--
"I got the Weary Blues
And I can't be satisfied.
Got the Weary Blues
And can't be satisfied--
I ain't happy no mo'
And I wish that I had died."
And far into the night he crooned that tune.
The stars went out and so did the moon.
The singer stopped playing and went to bed
While the Weary Blues echoed through his head.
He slept like a rock or a man that's dead.
The Weary Blues
At each station:
1) read the poem
2) use the G.O. to take notes about the poem
3) If time permits: identify common elements about Langston Hughes’ Style
What are some similarities you are noticing surrounding the Langston Hughes poetry?
Exit Ticket
In your folder -
Mood BCR (Winter/ Spring Garden)

Theme BCR ("Dream" poems)

Style graphic organizer
"I can't believe..."
"Woah! I'm surprised that..."
"Reading about ____ made me
happy/angry/sad because..."
Reader's Response -
record a reaction to something you read
Scholars will be able to analyze their grades and FAST data in order to take responsibility of their own learning.
Big Question: What are my strengths and areas for improvement in this class?
0
5
10
A's
B's
C's
D's
E's
Red Team
1
11
5
4
2
0
5
10
A's
B's
C's
D's
E's
Green Team
3
4
7
4
4
0
5
10
A's
B's
C's
D's
E's
Blue Team
5
7
7
2
3
Turn and Talk
What grade did you earn in this class? What did you do well? Where can you improve?
Why would it be helpful to look at FAST 1 data?
Learn your areas of strengths and weaknesses
Strengths: you can help classmates
Weaknesses: pay extra attention in class
Reminder of why it's important to do our best on tests
Question stem: write the phrasing of the questions you missed

% correct example: 3/4 =
3 divided by 4 = 0.75 = 75%
At each station:
1) read the poem
2) use the G.O. to take notes about the poem
Figurative Language: Similes, metaphors, personification
Imagery: appeals to the five senses
Structure: notes about lines, stanzas
Sound elements: ononmatopoiea, alliteration, assonance, rhyme
What are some similarities you are noticing surrounding the Langston Hughes poetry?
Quick Write
SSR
Reader's Response
Ask a question:
"I wonder..."
"Who/What/
Why/How...?"
Scholars will be able to organize their thoughts in an outline before writing a five paragraph essay.
Big Idea: Creating a plan for your essay
Literary Analysis Paper
Literary Analysis
an essay that breaks down & examines every element of a text (poem, story, etc.)
it makes an argument, also known as a
THESIS STATEMENT
A thesis statement is the focus of your paper that you must explain and defend using text evidence
Turn & Talk
What do you know about the writing process? What are some important steps to creating a good five paragraph essay?
At each station:
1) read the poem
2) use the G.O. to take notes about the poem
Figurative Language: Similes, metaphors, personification
Imagery: appeals to the five senses
Structure: notes about lines, stanzas
Sound elements: ononmatopoiea, alliteration, assonance, rhyme
Bring to pull-up:
1) folder
3) A pen or pencil
George Washington was the first president of the United States.

George Washington was the best president; I bet he was a cool guy.

George Washington was a great leader who had a very big impact on American History.


1 - Gwendolyn Brooks is without a doubt the most talented poet in the world

2 - Gwendolyn Brooks skilfully uses sound devices and structure elements to reflect the themes of her poems.
Use your outline handout to write your thesis. It should mention:
Langston Hughe's style (how he writes)
3 poetic elements that characterize his style

Essay Outline

Use your style chart to take notes on your outline

Organize your thoughts - you don't have to write in complete sentences

Follow the directions in the left-hand column


1 - An example of useful personification can be found in Nikki Giovvani's "Winter Poem," where she calls snowflakes her "cousins."

2 - Nikki Giovvani uses figurative language to make the meaning of her poems come alive for readers.

Rough Draft

Use your outline notes to create 3 body paragraphs

Turn your notes into complete sentences
Scholars will be able to analyze Langston Hughes' style in the form of a literary analysis paper
Big Question: How do I explain Langston Hughes' style and prove my argument?
SSR
Reader's Response
Ask a question:
"I wonder..."
"Who/What/
Why/How...?"
Think - Write - Share
Look at the essay rubric in your folders.

Describe three things (in your own words) that will help you get an "A" on this essay
Point to your Partner!
Share:
What are some of the requirements of this paper, according to the rubric? What will help you get an "A"?
Pull up with:
think/write/share
outline
rubric
pen/pencil
Introduction
should have:
Thesis: what is your statement about Langston Hughes' style?

How are you going to prove it? What poems will you use?
Conclusion
should have:
Re-stating your thesis (in different words)

New learning - what did you learn as you wrote the essay?
Emily Dickinson's style is made up of a lot of personification, very short and simple structure, and very profound themes about life and death.
You can see examples of her style by analyzing these elements in poems like "The Train," "Hope is a Thing with Feathers," and "Because I Did Not Stop for Death."

These features make her work stand out - the reader can always tell when it's one a poem by Emily Dickinson, even if her name is not listed.
One can see that poems by Emily Dickinson usually include personification, few stanzas, and life-and-death themes.
Her imaginative figurative language and deep themes make her short poems pack a quick but powerful punch.

When a reader comes across her work, he or she knows that they will get a lot from just a few lines.
Class Map
Bookshelves
SMART Board
sink
Outline
Outline
drafting
Fix Outline
drafting
Fix Outline
Writing / Drafting
Objective:
Lesson:
Work Period:
Independent Work:
Closing:
DAY 4
Scholars will be able to edit their own drafts to use correct capitalization, formatting, and punctuation.
Big Idea: Check over your work to make sure that it is clear, correct and presentable.
SSR
Reader's Response
Share:
What are some of the requirements of this paper, according to the rubric? What will help you get an "A"?
Class Map
Bookshelves
SMART Board
sink
Start
draft
Edit
Edit
Finish
draft
Make a prediction
Grammar Rules / Tips
11/18 NOTES
Indent new paragraphs!
No spacing or subtitles needed
Emily Dickinson's style is made up of a lot of personification, very short and simple structure, and very profound themes about life and death. These features make the reader can always tell when it's one a poem by Emily Dickinson, even if her name is not listed.
One common pattern in Dickinson's work is her frequent use of personification. In the poem, "The Train," she says the engine stops to "feed itself at tanks." This helps the reader imagine trains in a new and creative way, as if it was a hungry person.
One common pattern in Dickinson's work is her frequent use of personification. In the poem, "The Train," she says the engine stops to "feed itself at tanks." This helps the reader imagine trains in a new and creative way, as if it was a hungry person.
Use quotation marks for poem titles
and direct text evidence.
Punctuation belongs INSIDE quotes.
One common pattern in Dickinson's work is her frequent use of personification. In the poem, "The Train," she says the engine stops to "feed itself at tanks." This helps the reader imagine trains in a new and creative way, as if it was a hungry person.
Every new sentence should have capital letters. Proper nouns too - specific names, poem titles
One common pattern in emily dickinson's work is her frequent use of personification. In the poem The train, she says the engine stops to "feed itself at tanks". This helps the reader imagine trains in a new and creative way, as if it was a hungry person.
Let's Practice!
Start
draft
Finish
draft
Pull up - bring:
paper for notes
pen/pencil
essay materials
Full transcript