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The Black Death

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Joban Dharni

on 20 September 2012

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Transcript of The Black Death

Veer, Dalvir, Joban, Brandon The Black Death According to Dr Mike Ibeji at http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/middle_ages/black_01.shtml
The plague started in the 14th century in the year 1348, and was a serious disease which was rapidly spreading. 1348

August: Bristol
The Black Death entered Europe from Bristol at the south-eastern part of Europe. Bristol was Britain’s second largest city and with The Black Death taking away a third of its population. By 1349 15 out of 52 of Bristols city counclers were dead.

September: London
London was Britan’s largest city and between February 2, 1348 and April 12, 1348 The Black Death became so popular that they were burring about 200 people a day. They had to open another cemetery for the town and buried people in stacks of 5.

October: Winchester 1349
January-February: E. Anglia and the Midlands.

April: Wales
John le Strange lord of the Wales at the time was the first of the royal family to die. He passed away on the 20th of August. Before the inquest for the new lord could be held his son Fulk and Humphrey had died too. So the new lord possession was given to a third brother (also named john).

May: Halesowen

July: Ireland
In Ireland the plague was so dangerous and contagious that even if you touched a person dead from the disease you would instantly grab onto it yourself.

Autumn: Durham.
Scots who had been invading England thought it was revenge from the gods which had been sent to them because of their invasion. 1350:

Scotland: During autumn 1349 Scot army packed their bags and head back to Scotland. The winter of 1350 they arrived but it wasn’t until that spring when plague had broken lose in Scotland. Plague Bubonic Plague Flu like symptoms within 6 days.
Yersinia pestis bacteria enters through
skin openings, and gives Typhoid fever
a life threatening illness. Pneumonic Plague This type of plague affected humans and animals. It was found in rodents and fleas and causes bloody or watery saliva. Septicemic Plague Modern version of plague spread
through bites which cause infections
usually from rodents or fleas and can
still be life treating. Most people through Europe suffered from the plaque, mostly because European’s had a lot of trading and exporting so it was easy to spread the disease, the disease came over from a Italian cargo ship from china. It was usually spread through adults that travelled. In the 14th century everybody depended on each other, for food and other things, and back then there were no wireless communications, to speak to one another they had to meet each other doing that they would either catch or spread the disease . The children got it from their parents from physical contact. (cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr Fever Headache Chills Abdominal (stomach) pain Diarrhea, which may be bloody Nausea Black spots Decreased appetite Tiny broken blood vessels THE PLAGUE According to Dr. Mike Ibajei http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/middle_ages/blackdisease_01.shtml People didn’t notice the symptoms because the host would die very quickly. Most citizens didn’t have enough knowledge to even know what was going on. The way this disease spread wasn’t from direct contact it was indirect from fleas and other insects, because the houses weren’t closed of enough from insects like todays houses, and there were no bug repellents it wasn’t that hard catching the disease. And nearly impossible to get rid of. Obviously hygiene wasn’t a big thing and most people attracted bugs including fleas that were the primary transportation for the disease According to BBC dimensions http://howmanyreally.com/diseases/plague/ After five years 25 million people were dead, nearly half of Europe's population. The plaque still continues today but this disease is very rare. In the 14th century the bubonic plaque started from rodents in china. And fleas caught the disease, The disease starting in the world busiest trading country, It; was about time when it when global. How did this outbreak first occur?
The first outbreak of plague swept across England in 1348 to 1349. It traveled across the south in bubonic form during the summer months of 1348, before mutating into the pneumonic form in the winter.
BBC UK It hit London in September 1348, and spread into East Anglia all along the coast during the New Year. By spring 1349, it was attacking Wales and the Midlands, and by late summer, it had made the leap across the Irish Sea and then affected the north. BBC UK How long did the outbreak/disease last? Most of the sailors aboard the ships were dead, and those who were still alive were sick. They were overcome with fever, unable to eat food. Strangest of all, they were covered in black spots and gave their illness its name The Black Death. The Black Death arrived in Europe by sea in October 1347 when 12 trading ships docked at the Sicilian port of Messina after a long journey through the Black Sea. The people who gathered on the docks were met with a horrifying surprise.
The Black Death: Natural and Human Disaster in Medieval Europe Book The Sicilian police ordered the fleet of death ships out of the harbor, but it was too late. Over the next five years, the Black Death killed more than 20 million people in Europe–almost one-third of the continent’s population. Plague carrying rats hid away on ships headed for Europe infecting crew members whom spread the illness to families and communities in the Italian port cities of Genoa and Florence. The sick rats fled the ships and infected city rodent populations. By 1346 the plague had begun. According to BBC UK the source for bubonic plague originated in the remote grasslands of Central Asia. Wild rodents there infected with Yersinia pestis (along with their flea parasites) migrated to nearby villages after some natural disaster disturbed their food supply. They eventually spread the bacterium to colonies of black rats living in more established cities and towns. From the book The black death- natural and human disaster in europe
It was said in October 1347 ships being sent from China docked at Sicily were infected with rats on their ships. Many of the crew members had passed away by the time the ship was fully loaded. The disease had not instantly taken action in Europe, in Europe during winter it was flea season and the insects retracted the disease. The plague had the hugest impact on the church’s. Flagellant Brahren was a group who thought the Black Death was sent from god to punish sinners. Eventually so many people died that the people of Europe stopped believing in church. Back then:

Vinegar and water treatment- when a victim gets sick due to the black death they must get a lot of rest and washed in rose water and vinegar.
Lancing the buboes- when victims get infected they get swelling called buboes and they must be cut open so the disease can exit the body. After that a mix of tree resin, roots of white lilies and dried human excrement is put on to the part the body has been cut open.
Sanitation-victims are recommended to keep clean by washing their hands and avoid being around places with a lot of germs. Treatments then and now: The way this disease spread wasn’t from direct contact it was indirect from fleas and other insects, because the houses weren’t closed of enough from insects like todays houses, and there were no bug repellents it wasn’t that hard catching the disease. And nearly impossible to get rid of. Obviously hygiene wasn’t a big thing and most people attracted bugs including fleas that were the primary transportation for the disease Diet-victims must not eat anything with a bad smell or that digest quickly. They are recommended to eat lettuce and a lot of vegetables to help cure them.
Black magic- the person performing the black magic will place a live hen next to the infected victim and let it take out the pestilence from the body. Also a glass of the victims own urine should be drunk to help their recovery time.
Bleeding- the disease was in the blood so in order to get it out the vanes leading to the heart must be cut open which will allow the disease to exit the body. An ointment of clay and violets must be put on the area where the cut is. Now:
Antibiotics- are used now because vaccines are not available to the public for this rare disease. This helps to fight back against the disease and cures people 80% percent of the time.
Vaccines-are only for higher class people such as the military, which cures them but has multiple side effects. Some of the treatments where successful to fight against the black death in the modern day and back then but it was very rare to get cured in the 14th century
-It was very unlikely to find a cure for this disease in the 1300’s because most of them did not work.
-Now antibiotics work most of the time to cure the black death and help to fight back against the bacteria.
-Also some of the treatments could of killed the person like cutting the vanes open.
-By chance some of the old remedies worked, but most of the time it didn’t and people who were infected ended up dying. What was successful There were a lot of reasons why people thought they had the plague/black death. For instance churches thought people who were infected where sinners against the lord and where paying for their sins against humanity. This was popular in 1348-1350 until people started to find out that it was not because of people committing sins because innocent people started to die even priest and people started to riot against the church. Also they believed it traveled with rats and in the air around infected people
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