Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Five Analyt

No description
by

Shannon Mahoney

on 7 September 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Five Analyt

Move 3:
MAKE THE IMPLICIT, EXPLICIT

MOVE 5:
KEEP REFORMULATING QUESTIONS AND EXPLANATIONS
MOVE 4:
LOOK FOR PATTERNS

The Five Analytical
Moves

Move 2:
DEFINE SIGNIFICANT PARTS AND HOW THEY'RE RELATED
What do the five analytical moves do?
They serve to figure out:
what "it" means,
what "it" does,
and why "it" is the way it is.
MOVE 1:
SUSPEND JUDGEMENT

- Instead of answering with
like/dislike, or agree/disagree, use the phrase, "The thing I found interesting is..."

-Using "interesting" forces you to be more exploratory
-Divide Subject into defining parts

-Consider how the parts are related to each other

-Consider how the parts are related to the subject as a whole

-Be sure to work Small to Large (Parts to Whole)
REMEMBER: Giving attention to detail helps discover meaning and reveals the nature of the whole subject.

Figure out why something is important, then why it is important to the story as a whole.
- Make what is suggested become something obvious and overstated

- Convert suggestions into direct statements

- Think, "What is implied? What does this actually mean?

-In other words, READ BETWEEN THE LINES!
The process of drawing out implications is called "Making Inferences!" Make inferences happen!!!!
- Seek to understand the subject before deciding feeling

-Get rid of judge words, and look up what you don't know!
-Look for a pattern of repetition and for binary oppositions

-Find similarities and opposites in BOTH the word choice and content

-ALSO, look for anomalies (things that seem unusual or seem not to fit the patterns)
REPETITION
IS A
A SIGN OF EMPHASIS!
Usually, repetition is found through similarities.

It's a way for authors to let you know something is important!
BINARY OPPOSITIONS:
a pair where the elements within the pair are opposite

To find a binary opposition, look for the basic oppositions around which the subject is structured, or look for contrasts that are central to locating concerns and issues.
ANOMALIES are d
eviations from the normal order, or details that don't fit the pattern. Anomalies are a more subtle way for an author to say something important

* NOTE: THINGS THAT RUFFLE A PATTERN LEAD TO BETTER IDEAS!! If you concentrate on a deviation from the pattern rather than the pattern itself, you can create more interesting essays and give you more interesting things to say!
- Analysis requires a lot of experimenting

- Analysis should be a process of trial and error

- Analysis requires asking questions to help lead from uncertainty to understanding. Therefore, knowing how to frame questions will help lead to better writing.

SOME WELL-PHRASED QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD MAKE A HABIT OF ASKING WHILE ANNOTATING:
-Which details seem significant? Why?
-What does the detail mean? What else might it mean?
-How do the details fit together? What do they have in common?
-What does this pattern of details mean?
-What else could this pattern mean? How could it be explained?
-What details don't seem to fit? How might they connect with others to form a pattern?
- What does this new pattern mean? How might it cause me to read the details of individual details differently?
Questions should cause you to keep digging! You should be asking deep questions to push thinking and knowledge further!
Think of questioning like sand on a beach. Questions like "who," "when," "what" and "where," are merely the light, surface sand that blows away. To build a sufficient sand castle, you need to dig deep to the heavy, drenched sand that will pack together and build a solid foundation. These are the "why's" the "how's" and the questions that look for meaning
-Think of it as pouring everything you're thinking and feeling about a topic into a colander, and keeping only the facts and interest. Let the emotions and previous prejudices drain before continuing so that there is room for knowledge and learning.
Think of Step 2 in terms of baking. The "parts" are the ingredients and the "whole" is the cooked cake. It's important to not only know that there are eggs in the cake, but also that the eggs function to provide the cake with moisture, compared to flour which helps it rise. Knowing how each ingredient contributes, helps you better perfect the texture of the cake as a whole, and helps you better understand what ingredient helped make it better, and how.
Consider Step 3 to be detective work. You're combing the "text" trying to find hidden clues rather than looking at the obvious ones. The explicit information in a crime scene would be the overturned table and broken glass. Whereas the "implicit" clues may be fingerprints, or motive determined through extensive interviews.
Full transcript