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Review English V

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by

Lic. L. Ernesto González

on 1 August 2014

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Transcript of Review English V

Unit 1 Live and Learn
Unit 2 Then and Now
Unit 3 Buying Power
Unit 6 Decisions, Decisions
Unit 5 Through the Grapevine
Unit 4 Taking Care of Business
Lic. L. Ernesto González Pineda
ITESM CEM
Review English V
MAKE or DO ?
Use MAKE when you talk about something you create (you often use your hands)
e.g.
She
made
a cake for me
He
makes
birdhouses
They
made
a video
When we use DO, we talk about an action you do not mention by name;
mostly mental work;
mostly referred to the topic "work"
e.g. I
do
my homework every day
I often
do
the shopping on the weekend
I need to
do
this project at work.
MAKE or DO?
Write the correct answer.
1) to ____ a journey
2) to ____ the shopping
3) to ____ the beds
4) to ____ fun of someone
5) to ____ an exercise
6) to ____ one's best
7) to ____ a speech
8) to ____ a good job
9) to ____ a mistake
10)to ____ the homework
11) to ____ someone a favor
12) to ____ a bargain
13) to ____ an examination
14) to ____ a complaint
15) to ____ progress
16) to ____ the washing up
17) to ____ money
18) to ____ a reservation
19) to ____ harm to someone
20) to ____ a decision
Present Perfect + yet / already / just

1. Don't come in here with those muddy shoes!! I have ________ cleaned this floor!!!
2. Have you finished that composition for History class ______ ? You only started an hour ago!!
3. I don't want to see "Alien 9" at the cinema again. I've _____ seen it twice.
4. I'm sorry. You have ______ missed Katie. She left the office about three minutes ago!
5. Haven't you finished that composition for history class ______ ? You started over four hours ago!!
6. Oh, nothing for me, thank you. I've ______ eaten. I had dinner less than an hour ago.
7. You've finished your dinner _______ ! You must have been starving!
8. "Have you called Yasmin to wish her luck for the exam today?" "No, not _______ . I'll do it now!"
9. Kathy knows all about pizza and pasta, don't you Kathy? You've _______ returned from a month in Umbria.
10. Yes, I know David. We have ________ been introduced. It was at a party last week.
Complete the sentences using YET, ALREADY or JUST
Present Perfect Progressive
We use the present perfect continuous tense to talk about an action that started in the past and is continuing now. This is often used with for or since.
I

have been reading

for 2 hours.
[Action started in past. Action is continuing now]

We'
ve been studying
since 9 o'clock.

[We're still studying now.]

How long
have
you
been learning
English?
[You are still learning now.]

We
have not been smoking
.

[And we are not smoking now.]
An action that has just stopped or recently stopped
We use the present perfect continuous tense to talk about an action that started in the past and stopped recently. There is usually a result now.
I'm tired because I
've been running
.
Recent action. Result now.

Why is the grass wet
[now]
?

Has it been raining
?

You don't understand
[now]
because you

haven't been listening
.

Fill in the correct form (Present Perfect Simple or Present Perfect Progressive).
Tom: Hi Ana. I __________(try) to ring you several times today. Where __________(you / be) ?
Ana: I _________(be) at home all the time. But I __________(clean) the house all day, so maybe I didn't hear the phone ring.
Tom: _________(you / clean) everything now?
Ana: No, not yet. I _____________(tidy / not) up the kitchen yet. But why are you here?
Tom: Don't you remember? Jane _________(invite) us to her birthday party and we _____________(buy / not) a present for her yet.
Ana: Oh, that's right. ______________ (you / find out / already) what she wants?
Tom: Well, she _____________ (learn) Spanish for a year and wants to spend her next holiday in Mexico. Maybe we could get her a guide book.
Ana: That's a good idea. There is a good bookshop in the big shopping centre. I _________ (see) some nice books about Mexico there recently.
Present Perfect + yet / already / just
ORDER OF ADJECTIVES
They're fantastic orange leather shoes
It's a beautiful long blue silk scarf
Her pretty big gray eyes
USED TO
We use the expression USED TO to talk about things that were true in the past, but are not true in the present.

i.e. I
used to
play videogames all day.
We
used to
go to the park on the weekend.

We use DIDN'T USE TO to talk about things that weren't true in the past, but are probably true in the present.
I
didn't use to
work full time.
(but now I probably do)
SO / TOO EITHER / NEITHER
We use SO, TOO, EITHER and NEITHER to express similarity; i.e. to show that we agree with the other person's opinion on something.
e.g.
I
love
chocolate
Me
TOO
SO
do I
I do
TOO
I
don't like
onion
Me
NEITHER
NEITHER
do I
I don't
EITHER

Use SO & TOO for affirmative sentences
SO + aux +
I
enjoy
beach picnics So
do
I
We
used to
go to the beach So
did
we
+ aux + TOO
I
love
vacations I
do
too
They
had
a good time We
did
too
Use EITHER / NEITHER for negative sentences
+ neg aux + EITHER
I
can't
swim I
can't
either
I
haven't baked
a cake I
haven't
either
NEITHER + aux +
Jim
isn't
going to the beach Neither
am
I
I
didn't
like the food Neither
did
I
Agree with the following statements
1. I can't speak Japanese ____________
2. She works in an office ____________
3. Tim used to walk to work ____________
4. They haven't finished their homework ____________
5. I can cook Italian food ____________
6. We didn't like videogames ____________
7. My dad forgets everything ____________
8. I was class president in high school ____________
9. I should study harder for the exam ____________
10. I've traveled to Cancun several times ____________
THE vs No article
Uses
Before nouns of which there is only one.
"The earth is round."

Before a noun which has become definite as a result of being mentioned a second time.
"We saw a good film last night. It was the film you recommended."

Before names of seas, rivers, chains of mountains, groups of islands and plural names of countries.
"the Pacific Ocean, the Thames, the Andes, the West Indies, the Netherlands"

Before musical instruments.
"She plays the piano"


No article
We do not use an article when we talk about plural nouns when we are talking generally.
Dogs are very intelligent animals.

Companies spend lots of money in advertising

Young people are more interested in technology these days.
1. How much money do you want? Give me ________ 10 dollars.
2. I gave him ________ money that I found.
3. She is ________ only person here that speaks Japanese.
4. I live in ________ London.
5. This kind of ________ weather makes me happy.
6. She brought ________ plant that is next to the window.
7. What does he do? He sells ________ cars.
8. I live on ________ Washington Street.
9. I drank ________ glass of milk on the table.
10. Two of my classmates come from ________ Vietnam.
ARTICLE or NO ARTICLE?
___ advertising is a very important part of ___ media. Advertisers look for ____ different ways to attract ___ audiences, especially ___ young: they are ___ most interested in ____ products and ___ technology.

___ Ads are becoming more and more complex. ____ new ads include ____ celebrities and expensive special effects. ____ famous people that appear in ___ ads get lots of ___ money for giving their support to ___ product.
THE vs No article
Indirect Questions
We use indirect questions when we want to make more polite questions. They have an opening phrase before the main question. Indirect questions DO NOT follow the question word order.
Opening phrases:
Do you know...? Could you tell me...?
Can you tell me... ? Do you have any idea...?
For YES / NO questions, include
IF/WHETHER
after the opening phrase.
Where can I buy a good computer?
Can you tell me where I CAN buy a good computer?
Are there any internet cafés around here?
Do you know IF THERE ARE any internet cafés around here?
How much did she pay for the TV?
Do you have any idea HOW MUCH SHE PAID for the TV?
1. Are you going to the party?
2. Should we leave a tip for the waiter?
3. Can he speak Russian?
4. Do you work in an office?
5. Where did you find that lamp?
6. How much is the new iPhone?
7. When are we taking the final exam?
8. What does a student need to know to pass the test?
9. How often do you play sports?
10. Do your parents speak English?
11. Why did she leave the class early?
12. Who was that girl talking to?
13. What time does the class finish?
Words can be combined to form compound nouns. These are very common, and new combinations are invented almost daily. They normally have two parts. The
second part
identifies the object or person in question (man, friend, tank, table, room). The
first part
tells us what kind of object or person it is, or what its purpose is (police, boy, water, dining, bed):
COMPOUND NOUNS
e.g.
POLICE
MAN
BOY
FRIEND
WATER

TANK
DINING

TABLE
BED
ROOM
What type/purpose?

police
boy
water
dining
bed
what / who ?

man
friend
tank
table
room
one word or two words?
There are no clear rules about this - so write the common compounds that you know well as one word, and the others as two words.
noun + noun

bedroom
water tank
motorcycle
printer cartridge
noun + verb

rainfall
haircut
hairdo
verb + noun

washing machine
driving license
swimming pool
Match the words to form a compound noun to complete the sentences
Hair
Heart
News
Bed
Guide
Night
Green
Sea
House
Base
Ball
House
Room
Club
Food
Paper
Book
Beat
Work
Brush

1 - The place where you sleep.
BEDROOM
2 - A popular American sport.
3 - Sushi is an example of this.
4 - A place to grow plants.
5 - A place to party!
6 - A thing you use to look after the stuff on top of your head.
7 - You might need one of these if you go travelling.
8 - Chores like tidying and cleaning.
9 - You need one of these to live!
10 - You may read one on the way to work.

Have / get something done

This construction is passive in meaning. It describes situations where we want someone else to do something for us (as a favor, or as a service we pay for)
I must
get / have
my hair
cut.
When
are you going to get
that window
replaced
?
We'
re having
the house
painted
.
We
had
this sculpture
done
for the new house.
HAVE / GET +
+ Past participle
What can you have/get done in these places?
HAVE / GET +
+ Past participle
HAVE / GET +
+ Past participle
We need to have the lightbulb tightened
We need to get the lightbulb tightened
have +
get +
+ do +
+ to do +
The expression "to have somebody do something" is used to talk about activities performed by a specific subject.

I will
have
Mike
repair
my car.
My father
had
Mr. Johnson
paint
a picture of himself.

"to get somebody to do something" is very similar to "to have somebody do something ". However, its meaning is closer to "persuade".

I must
get
my dad
to buy
me a new computer.
We need
to get
the teacher
to give
us a good grade.
"I am called Victoria"

"I am married to David Beckham"

"I have three sons"

"We live in America"
Reported Speech
When we report someone’s words we can do it in two ways. We can use direct speech with quotation marks (“I work in a bank”), or we can use reported speech (He said he worked in a bank.)

In reported speech the tenses, word-order and pronouns may be different from those in the original sentence.

Reporting Questions
When we report what people say, we usually change the tense of the verbs to reflect that we are reporting – not giving direct speech. This pattern is followed when we report questions and there are also other important changes between direct questions and reported questions.

Yes/no questions

Direct question: “Do you like working in teams?”
Reported question: He asked if I liked working in teams.
When we report yes/no questions we use ‘if’ or ‘whether’.

Direct question: “Did you enjoy the party?”
Reported question: She asked me whether I’d enjoyed the party.

The tense of the verb changes as it does in reported speech but we don’t use auxiliary verbs. The word order is the same as in an affirmative sentence.

Questions with a question word

Direct question: “What time does the train leave?”
Reported question: He asked what time the train left.

When there is a question word (what, where, why, who, when, how) we use that question word in the reported question but there is no auxiliary verb and the word order is like an affirmative sentence (‘what time the train left’ not He asked me what time did the train leave.)

Direct question: “Who
did
you
see
?”
Reported question: She asked me who I
’d seen
.
Direct question: “Where
did
you
go
to school?”
Reported question: He asked me where I
’d gone
to school.
Direct question: “Why
are
you
crying
?”
Reported question: She asked him why he
was crying
.
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