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Art Therapy at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

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Casey Harvilla

on 25 October 2013

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Transcript of Art Therapy at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

Art Therapy at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC
October 25, 2013
Presented by Art Therapy Externs, Casey Harvilla and Rob Lynch
1. Draw a line or image to express how you're feeling today, this week, this month, etc.

2. Without explaining your line or image to your partner, share your thoughts about their line or image (what you see, what you think it means, etc.)

3. Discuss with the group.
What are your first impressions of the artwork?
What would you say to the child?
What might be inappropriate to say?
What are your first impressions of the artwork?
What would you say to the child?
What might be inappropriate to say?
***Note: This refers specifically to artwork created in the therapeutic setting.***
What you SHOULD NOT say:
- Do not praise the artwork!
For example: "Wow! That's beautiful!" or "That's so good!" or "You're such a great artist!"
- Avoid leading questions and asking WHY?
What is appropriate:
- Process comments
For example: "Wow, there are so many colors!" or "This line is really thick."
***Note: This refers specifically to artwork created in the therapeutic setting.***
- Do not make assumptions!
*Remember:

Our role IS NOT to interpret, assess, diagnose, or detect meaning in a client's artwork.

Our role IS to empower the client through dialogue so that he/she describes meaning, discovers connections, and determines when and how their art will be used.
- Wondering and curiosity
For example: "I'm wondering what the relationship might be between this small round object and this sharp jagged line. They seem to be almost touching." or "I'm curious because you've said you were excited about moving, yet I see sad faces in your picture."
What is appropriate:
- Using the art as a metaphor for the self
For example: "If you were this spot of yellow surrounded by this deep red, how might that feel?"
- Sharing feeling responses
For example: "There are a lot of flowers in the little girl's hand. Some look quite alive while others are wilted. I get a mixed feeling from that, like she's holding something with a lot of life in it, and something the life has gone out of. Do you get that same sense?"
***Note: This refers specifically to artwork created in the therapeutic setting.***
What is art therapy?
Art therapy is...
a mental health profession in which clients, facilitated by the art therapist, use art media, the creative process, and the resulting artwork to explore their feelings, reconcile emotional conflicts, foster self-awareness, manage behavior, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem.
(as defined by the American Art Therapy Association)
Art therapy approaches:
Art as therapy
Art in psychotherapy
Art making in and of itself is healing. In this approach, the emphasis is on the art making process.
Art is a way of reaching the unconscious mind. The production of images is cathartic, however, the emphasis in this approach is on gaining insight through exploration of the meaning of the images.
Underlying assumptions
Projective hypothesis
Universality of visual language
What is portrayed in the artwork is a direct reflection of the unconscious self. Spontaneous and directed art are significant expressions of the ways individuals shape their worlds and can be explored just as any other behavior to gain insight and achieve growth and healing.
Lines, shapes, and colors constitute a phenomenological language that is based in human physiology and can be read and understood on that basis. Understanding how to read the phenomenology in art requires training and some familiarity with art materials. Different art media have unique potential for expression.
Techniques
You might see us...
- scribbling
- sequence drawing
- painting
- dialoguing
- playing through art
Education Background and Requirements
Psychology
Art
Counseling
Lifespan Development
Couples/Family Therapy
Group Therapy
Questions?
Contact us for further information and referrals!

Casey: casey.harvilla@chp.edu
Rob: carl.lynch3@chp.edu
Artwork by 9 year old girl
Artwork by 7 year old girl
Sculpture by 14 year old girl
Painting by 9 year old girl
Full transcript