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Copy of Brutus The Tragic Hero

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Eric Pena

on 13 November 2012

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Transcript of Copy of Brutus The Tragic Hero

Brutus the Tragic Hero Is Brutus a
Tragic Hero? A Tragic Hero is a man of noble stature who is destined for downfall, suffering, or defeat who is later redeemed The tragic hero is
of noble stature
and has greatness The Tragic Hero has a
tragic flaw which
leads to their downfall
Provide an example of how Brutus' decision about the fate of Antony would be evidence of his tragic flaw. The hero's downfall,
is their own fault,
the result of free choice.
Example from Antony's speech: The punishment
exceeds the crime. Portia kills her self and so does Brutus: .Redemption for character. Redemption for character. Example of the actions of Octavius: The Verdict In this presentation I will prove how Brutus falls under this category Example of dialogue: Act I The tragic hero is
of noble stature
and has greatness Act I Example of Monologue: Cassius says-
"Now is it Rome indeed and room enough,
When there is in it but one only man.
O! you and I have heard our fathers say,
There was a Brutus once that would have
brook'd" The tragic hero is
of noble stature
and has greatness Example of Soliloquy: In Cassius' soliloquy he says-"Well, Brutus, thou art noble" Casca says-
" O! he sits high in all the people's
hearts" Act I The Tragic Hero has a
tragic flaw which
leads to their downfall Example of soliloquy: In Cassius' soliloquy-
"Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see,
Thy honourable metal may be wrought
From that it is dispos'd: therefore 'tis meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes" Example of dialogue: The Tragic Hero has a
tragic flaw which
leads to their downfall Bru. Thy master is a wise and valiant
Roman;
I never thought him worse.
Tell him, so please him come unto this place,
He shall be satisfied; and, by my honour,
Depart untouch'd.
Serv. I'll fetch him presently. [Exit.
Bru. I know that we shall have him well to
friend. O Brutus!
The heavens speed thee in thine enterprise. The Tragic Hero has a
tragic flaw which
leads to their downfall Examples of what Portia says: "Shall no man else be touch'd but only
Cæsar?" "No man bears sorrow better; Portia is
dead" "Farewell, good Strato. Cæsar, now be still;
I kill'd not thee with half so good a will." The hero's downfall,
is their own fault,
the result of free choice Example of monologue: The hero's downfall,
is their own fault,
the result of free choice Example of dialogue: "O Antony! beg not your death of us.
Though now we must appear bloodypresent and cruel,
As, by our hands and this our act,
You see we do, yet see you but our hands
And this the bleeding business they have done" Or else were this a savage spectacle.
Our reasons are so full of good regard
What were you, Antony, the son of Cæsar,
You. should be satisfied. The hero's downfall,
is their own fault,
the result of free choice Example from Brutus' speech: "Not that
I loved Cæsar less, but that I loved Rome more." "But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man." Increase in awareness,
some gain in self-knowledge. Dialogue between Cassius and Brutus about being captured: Cas. "Then, if we lose this battle,
You are contented to be led in triumph
Thorough the streets of Rome?"
Bru. "No, Cassius, no: think not" "And I am Brutus, Marcus Brutus, I;
Brutus, my country's friend; know me for
Brutus!" Increase in awareness,
some gain in self-knowledge. Dialogue between Brutus and his soldiers: "Farewell, good Strato.—[He runs on his
sword.] Cæsar, now be still;
I kill'd not thee with half so good a will." Brutus says- Redemption for character. Dialogue between Antony and his soldiers: "This them was the noblest Roman of all" "According to his virtue let us use him,
With all respect and rites of burial." Caesar: Caesar is of great noble stature. (Great noble stature)
Caesar's tragic flaw is his ambitions. (Tragic Flaw)
Caesar is is killed for his ambition. (Punishment exceeds the crime)
Caesar's tragic flaw is his choice. (The hero's downfall,is their own fault)
The people who kill him eventually die because of their actions. (Redemption for Character)
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