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Literary Devices in the Great Gatsby

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by

Pau Sard

on 25 September 2014

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Transcript of Literary Devices in the Great Gatsby

“Mr Gatsby is sick?” is a question asked at the start of the chapter which in a sense foreshadows the coming sickness that will befall Gatsby’s life.
Irony
Daisy and Jordan are described to be “silver idols”


Jordan's hands described as “white”




Symbolism
The temperature is repeatedly described to be “hot”.

Nick's black stain

Daisy calling her daughter a dream

Dr Eckleburg’s eyes
Foreshadowing
Imagery
“It was dawn now on Long Island and we went about opening the rest of the windows downstairs, filling the house with gray-turning, gold-turning light. The Shadow of a tree fell abruptly across the dew and ghostly birds began to sing among the blue leaves. There was a slow, pleasant movement in the air, scarcely a wind, promising a cool, lovely day.”
Simile
“…Jay Gatsby had broken up like glass against Tom’s hard malice”
“Daisy, gleaming like silver, safe and proud above the hot struggles of the poor”

Situational Irony
Wilson kills Gatsby which is ironic because Gatsby was having an affair with Daisy and one would expect that Tom would be the one to kill him.
Metaphor
"However glorious might his future as Jay Gatsby, he was at present a penniless young man without a past, and at any moment the invisible cloak of his uniform might slip from his shoulders"
Simile and Irony
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Literary Devices in the Great Gatsby
Metaphor
"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past"
"He ran over Myrtile like you'd run over a dog"

"Thank you, old sport"
Full transcript