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Romeo and Juliet Allusion - Cupid

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Jordan Boatman

on 7 April 2014

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Transcript of Romeo and Juliet Allusion - Cupid

Cupid is the Roman god of love. Cupid is equipped with a bow and arrows. His arrows, when shot at a human, make them fall in love. He is often depicted as a winged baby. His mother is Venus, the god of beauty and all things love, but the his father is not quite clear. His father is disputed between Mars, the god of war, and Mercury, the messenger of the gods.
Allusion Location
The reference to Cupid in Romeo and Juliet is in: Act 1, Scene 4, and Line 205.
"She refuses to be hit by Cupid's arrow." - Romeo
Plot Context
During this scene, Benvolio is talking to Romeo about how he is in love. Romeo is complaining because he is in love with Rosaline, but she doesn't love him back. Here he references Cupid and his arrows, as Cupid's arrows make people fall in love. Benvolio is trying to tell Romeo that there are other girls. Eventually, Mercutio shows up and talks Romeo into going to a party.
Romeo and Juliet Allusion - Cupid

Jordan Boatman

This allusion is a smart play on the scene to convey Romeo's feelings. Cupid has been used as a metaphor for being in love for centuries. Shakespeare pays tribute to the Roman gods heavily in Romeo and Juliet and is an accurate representation of what would be said, considering this play takes place in Italy.
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