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Adapting a textbook for TPRS

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Michele Whaley

on 24 September 2012

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Transcript of Adapting a textbook for TPRS

From Textbook to TPRS Textbooks support CI
source of grammar
pictures as story prompts
source for culture
reading texts
listening/videos
tests as benchmarks Textbooks dilute CI
not personalized
not compelling
have too much vocabulary The good, the bad, and the ugly Demo Cognates TPR words Target structures basketbol
futbol
musica
beisbol
gimnastica
gandbol igrayit: plays
lyubit: loves
eta: this is
byot v baraban: beats the drum
dvyer: door dnyom: in the daytime
nochyu: at night
na skreepki: on the violin KTO: who
SHTO: what
NA CHOM: on what
KAGDA: when Steps for adapting Grammar
Overview
Consider impact on meaning
Don't shelter Divide vocabulary
Cognates
TPR-able
High-frequency
Dispensible Points to observe
clarify cognates
TPR vocabulary
PQA with class
Ask story
Include pop-ups
Use text pictures
follow up with reading Teach students, not curriculum! Textbooks impede CI
limit grammar (*SG on natural order)
don't recycle vocabulary (*SG on textbks)
offer canned practice (*TTW on pair talks) Terry Thatcher Waltz
http://albanylanguagelearning.com/blog/?p=46 How textbooks can help deliver comprehensible input. Let’s think about a couple of possibilities.

1. Two students read each other questions and answer them. (Gets points for #1, 3, 5)

The two students are reading the questions from a list or book, so we know the grammar and usage are (should be) correct. So the issue of formal accuracy is taken care of. What’s missing is the optimization of the model input — students do not always have the best accents to emulate, and reading out loud is not a natural language task so the output will be a bit stilted at best anyway. Interesting? I suppose if you’re one of those straight-A students, or if you’re paired up with your best friend, you might find it moderately interesting to ask a whole list of “do you like” questions of your friend, one after the other. Unpredictable? Hardly. It’s fairly obvious to everyone what’s coming next; by the time they get to middle school, kids have a pretty good idea how textbooks work.

Input grade: 60% (barely passing) 2. Two students ask each other questions (no list or textbook used). (#1, 3, 5).

Same idea as (1) above, except points will almost always be lost for accuracy unless the students have already acquired the patterns being practiced — in which case, why are they practicing them in a language class? (I am assuming that these Q&A are intended for pattern practice, because I simply cannot think of another reason why students in a typical lower-level language class would ask a bunch of questions of each other.)

Overall grade: 40% (fail) 3. Teacher asks questions based on a list or textbook (#1, 3, 5)

Although the teacher asking the questions at least guarantees (we hope) a good accent and accurate delivery in a more animated way, this still lacks unpredictability. And that’s assuming the teacher isn’t going in alphabetical order calling on kids! And the most animated teacher can’t make “#4. Cuál clase le gusta más a María?” interesting.

Grade: 60% (barely passing) 4. Teacher asks questions based on a developing story created by the class. (#1, 2, 3, 4, 5) This method hits on all the optimal characteristics of comprehensible input. It’s accurate, it hits the structures being emphasized, it’s interesting because it’s talking about content the class has decided on, not something imposed on them, it’s unpredictable because the story hasn’t been completed yet — what could be less predictable than that? It’s structured because the teacher knows what structure or items she is emphasizing, and takes care to repeat them using techniques that get in a lot of reps without getting repetitious.
Input grade: 98% Teach 3 structures a day
Clarify meaning
Talk to the students
Read On a prominent foreign language teachers’ List, the question was raised:

Why are conversations with partners not CI? If one student asks “What is your favorite class and why?” and the other student answers intelligibly, then why is this less optimal CI than storytelling?

Well, of course it is CI. Sort of. But McDonald’s is food, too — barely. Pairwork is the junk food of the language class. It provides poor-quality input. There are other legitimate reasons to use it at times, but providing optimal, maximized input isn’t one of them. First, let’s think about what CI should ideally be:

1. Comprehensible (totally understood by the student);
2. Unpredictable (so that comprehension makes more impact);
3. Yet structured to provide what’s needed (to guarantee that curriculum is covered)
4. Compelling (or at least interesting) to get students to be engaged in thinking about what the language means rather than focusing on the form.
5. Accurate (it should be the best available model of the language being taught, both in grammar and usage, as well as accent, intonation, and so on.) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Use the text
use pictures
use video
pre-ask texts
write embedded stories Clip art sources
http://tinyurl.com/4e3psxq (book 1)
http://www.clker.com/clipart-9706.html (book 2) Resources
http://prezi.com CI is king.
TPRS is one way to provide CI. Application time Coaching Susan Gross:http://susangrosstprs.com/
More TPRS forum: http://tprstalk.net
Yahoo listserve: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/moretprs/join
MW blog: http://mjtprs.wordpress.com
Beth Skelton forms: http://www.bethskelton.com/handouts-and-forms.html
Laurie Clarcq's blog: http://blog.heartsforteaching.com/ TPRS sites This prezi:
http://tinyurl.com/476srgc Eta Max. Max igrayit na skreepki. Max igrayit na skreepki dnyom.
Igor byot po dveri. Igor nye lyubit skreepku dnyom. Max igrayit na skreepki nochyu. Igor byot v baraban nochyu. Igor lyubit skreepku nochyu! dnyom: in the daytime
nochyu: at night
na skreepki: on the violin igrayit: plays
lyubit: loves
eta: this is
byot v baraban: beats the drum
dvyer: door Adaptation styles Do all your own stories; use the book only as source and background, occasionally dipping into it for specific goals. OR...Use TPRS to introduce each chapter's main grammar and vocabulary; then complete the chapter as usual. OR...Use the key grammar and vocabulary from the textbook all year; during the last two weeks, "cover the textbook" by reading through it with students so as to prepare them for future teachers who may not use TPRS. Fact: you will have to make choices based on your own style, building requirements, and your comfort level. If you're leery, try using TPRS ideas for just five to ten minutes a day for your warm-up. Typically, you will find that kids learn the most during that time and you will develop skills and confidence. Embedded reading: just one more tool to scaffold complex texts for student success. If we have time-- Non-textbook reading sources movie sites (Imdb in TL: Kinopoisk.ru)
musicians' home pages
news of the weird
BBC language pages Terry Thatcher Waltz, on FLTeach 3/8/2011:
The underlying philosophy [between TPRS and traditional teaching] is largely mutually exclusive: CI leads to acquisition, output doesn't, versus rule application leads to acquisition and output helps. kharasho: well
kricheet: shouts
plokha: bad

Eta Max. Max igrayit na skreepki. Max igrayit kharasho na skreepki. Max igrayit na skreepki dnyom. Kagda Max igrayit na skreepki dnyom, Igor byot po dveri. Igor nye lyubit skreepku dnyom. Igor kricheet, “Eta plokha!” Max nye kricheet. Max igrayit na skreepki nochyu. Igor byot v baraban nochyu. Igor igrayit na barabanyi kharasho! Igor lyubit skreepku nochyu! Conference!
http://www.afla-ak.org/ rad: happy
plachit: cries
sasyedi: neighbors

Eta Max. Max igrayit na skreepki. Max rad! Max igrayit kharasho na skreepki. Max igrayit na skreepki dnyom. Kagda Max igrayit na skreepki dnyom, Igor byot po dveri. Igor nye lyubit skreepku dnyom. Igor nye rad. Sasyedi nye radi. Sasyedi--eta Tanya i Ivan. Tanya plachit. Ivan byot! Igor kricheet, “Eta plokha!” Max nye kricheet. Max igrayit na skreepki nochyu. Max rad. Igor byot v baraban nochyu. Igor igrayit na barabanyi kharasho! Igor lyubit skreepku nochyu! Tanya nye plachit. Ivan nye byot. Tanya i Ivan radi.
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