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Scoutmaster Specific Training

A Template for District Roundtable Announcements
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on 13 August 2014

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Transcript of Scoutmaster Specific Training

Scoutmaster Specific Training [S24]
15 December, 2013
Skills
Instruction
Patrol
Meetings
Closing
Interpatrol
Activity
Opening
Ceremony
Preopening
Activity
Course Overview
Welcome to the Boy Scouts of America!
The Role of the Scoutmaster
Troop Organization
One of you most important challenges as Scoutmaster is to train boy leaders to run the troop by providing direction, coaching, and support. They will make mistakes now and then and will rely upon you to guide them. But only through real hands-on experience as leaders can boys learn to lead.
-The Scoutmaster Handbook,
Chapter 3, "The Boy-Led Troop"
Why have Troop Meetings?
The Name Game
.
Welcome and Introductions
Session One
Getting Started: The Role of the Scoutmaster in a Boy-Led Troop
Working with Boy Leaders/The Patrol Method
"The patrol method is not
a
way to operate a Boy Scout troop, it is the
only
way. Unless the patrol method is in operation you don't really have a Boy Scout troop."
- Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting
After the
Meeting
Scout Handshake
Made with the hand nearest the heart and is offered as a token of friendship. Extend your left hand to another Scout and firmly grasp his left hand. The fingers do not interlock.
-Boy Scout Handbook
Chapter 1, "The Adventure Begins"
Adventure
Learning
Challenge
Responsibility
Delivering the promise of Scouting
The Continuum of Training for New Scoutmasters
Fast Start
Basic Leader Training
Advanced Leader Training
Fast Start: Boy Scouting
This Is Scouting (Optional 01/01/2012)
Position Specific Training
Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills
Wood Badge
Session One - Getting Started: The Role of the Scoutmaster in a Boy-Led Troop
Preopening Activity
Welcome and Participant Introductions
Course Overview
The Role of the Scoutmaster
Troop Organization
Troop Meetings
Working with Boy Leaders/The Patrol Method
Patrol Leaders' Council
Session Two - Lighting the Fire: The Outdoor Program and the Advancement Program
Preopening Activity
Introduction
Sizzle of the Outdoor Program
Nuts and Bolts of the Outdoor Program
Outdoor Program Patrol/Group Activity
Reflection
Advancement Program
Session Three - Keeping It Going: Program Planning and Troop Administration
Preopening Activity
Introduction
Program Planning
Membership
Paperwork
Finances
The Uniform
Other Training Opportunities
Summary and Closing
`
Written Resources for Scoutmasters
The Scoutmaster Handbook
The Boy Scout Handbook
Other BSA Literature
Troop Program Resources
Guide to Safe Scouting
Fieldbook
Summary
As done by the Seven Steps of a Troop Meeting
Your role comes first - everything else, the outdoors, advancement through the ranks, planning, and administration - is an outgrowth of that
Getting Started: The Role of the Scoutmaster in a Boy-Led Troop
Light the Fire: The Outdoor Program and the Advancement Program
Keeping It Going: Program Planning and Troop Administration
Qualities of a Scoutmaster
Do
Be
Know
Structure of a Boy Scout Troop
Patrols
New-Scout patrols
Regular patrols
Venture patrols
Patrol Leaders
- Elected by each patrol
Senior Patrol Leader
- Elected by the Troop
Patrol Leader's Council
Adult Leadership Positions in a Scout Troop
Scoutmaster
Assistant Scoutmaster(s)
Troop Committee - at least 3 members
Parents
Where Boy Scouts Come From and Where They Go
Cub Scouts
Webelos Dens
Boy Scouts
Varsity Scouting
Venturing
Sea Scouting
Boy
Led
Troop
Using
Patrol
Method
B
L
T
U
P
M
Troop Meetings
Motivating boys
Strengthening patrols
Promoting patrol spirit
Encouraging Scouts to learn and practice Scouting skills
Allowing Scouts to exercise leadership
Who plans and Runs the Troop Meetings
The Patrol Leaders Council
The Troop Meeting Plan
Preopening
Opening
Skills Instruction
Patrol Meetings
Interpatrol Activity
Closing
After the Meeting
Opening - 5 Minutes
Skills Instruction - 15 to 20 minutes
Patrol Meetings - 5 to 20 minutes
Interpatrol Activity - 15 to 20 minutes
Closing - 5 minutes
Troop Meeting Plan Resources
Scoutmaster Handbook
Troop Program Features
The Scoutmaster's Role in Troop Meetings
Video No. 1 - Before the Meeting
Discussion
Video No. 2 - After the Meeting
Discussion
Video No. 3 - Teaching the Senior Patrol Leader
Discussion
"A leader is best when people barely know he exists; not so good when people obey and acclaim him; worse when they despise him. But a good leader who talks little when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say, "We did it ourselves.'"
- Sun-Tsu
When it comes to working with boys,
what are your greatest concerns?
One of your most important challenges as Scoutmaster is to train boy leaders to run the troop by providing direction, coaching, and support. They will make mistakes now and then and will rely upon you to guide them. But only through real hands-on experience as leaders can boys learn to lead.
-
The Scoutmaster Handbook,
Chapter 3, "The Boy-Led Troop."
A Key to Troop Leadership
Leadership is often a matter of providing what is missing.
Listening
Listen to the Scouts in your Troop. Make yourself available to them during Scoutmaster conferences, on hikes and campouts, and on other occasions when they want to talk. Often they will simply be eager to share the excitement of a moment or the pride of having learned a new skill or completed a requirement. At other times they may have concerns about something happening in the troop or in their lives. Train yourself to pay attention to what they are saying and to listen without passing judgement. When you are willing to hear what they want to share, you can address issues in ways that are coherent, meaningful, and effective.
-
The Scoutmaster Handbook,
Chapter 11, "Working With Boys"
Positive Reinforcement
Matching Leadership Styles to the Needs of Scouts, Patrols and Troops
E
D
G
E
Explaining
Demonstrating
Guiding
Enabling
The Sense of belonging to a group
What Scouting Can Provide a Boy
The sense of belonging to a group
Achievement and recognition
Self-esteem
Confidence in himself
Self-discipline
Self-reliance
Healthy interactions with others
Importance and effectiveness of teamwork
-
The Scoutmaster Handbook,
Chapter 11, "Working With Boys"
Patrol Leaders' Council
Video No. 4 - Patrol Leaders' Council
Discussion
Video No. 5 - Activity Review
Discussion
Summary of Session One
Welcome participants
Introductions
Boy Scout Handshake
Offer the SPL support and guidance (as the meeting begins)
Sharing the Scoutmaster's Minute (at the close of the meeting)
Meeting with the SPL and PLC to assess the meeting and review next one
Skills
Instruction
Patrol
Meetings
Closing
Interpatrol
Activity
Opening
Ceremony
Preopening
Activity
Course Overview
Welcome to the Boy Scouts of America!
The Role of the Scoutmaster
Troop Organization
One of you most important challenges as Scoutmaster is to train boy leaders to run the troop by providing direction, coaching, and support. They will make mistakes now and then and will rely upon you to guide them. But only through real hands-on experience as leaders can boys learn to lead.
-The Scoutmaster Handbook,
Chapter 3, "The Boy-Led Troop"
Why have Troop Meetings?
The Name Game
.
Welcome and Introductions
Session Two
Session Two - Lighting the Fire: The Outdoor Program and the Advancement Program
Working with Boy Leaders/The Patrol Method
"The patrol method is not
a
way to operate a Boy Scout troop, it is the
only
way. Unless the patrol method is in operation you don't really have a Boy Scout troop."
- Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting
After the
Meeting
Scout Handshake
Made with the hand nearest the heart and is offered as a token of friendship. Extend your left hand to another Scout and firmly grasp his left hand. The fingers do not interlock.
-Boy Scout Handbook
Chapter 1, "The Adventure Begins"
Adventure
Learning
Challenge
Responsibility
Delivering the promise of Scouting
The Continuum of Training for New Scoutmasters
Fast Start
Basic Leader Training
Advanced Leader Training
Fast Start: Boy Scouting
This Is Scouting (Optional 01/01/2012)
Position Specific Training
Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills
Wood Badge
Session One - Getting Started: The Role of the Scoutmaster in a Boy-Led Troop
Preopening Activity
Welcome and Participant Introductions
Course Overview
The Role of the Scoutmaster
Troop Organization
Troop Meetings
Working with Boy Leaders/The Patrol Method
Patrol Leaders' Council
Session Two - Lighting the Fire: The Outdoor Program and the Advancement Program
Preopening Activity
Introduction
Sizzle of the Outdoor Program
Nuts and Bolts of the Outdoor Program
Outdoor Program Patrol/Group Activity
Reflection
Advancement Program
Session Three - Keeping It Going: Program Planning and Troop Administration
Preopening Activity
Introduction
Program Planning
Membership
Paperwork
Finances
The Uniform
Other Training Opportunities
Summary and Closing
Written Resources for Scoutmasters
The Scoutmaster Handbook
The Boy Scout Handbook
Other BSA Literature
Troop Program Resources
Guide to Safe Scouting
Fieldbook
Summary
As done by the Seven Steps of a Troop Meeting
Your role comes first - everything else, the outdoors, advancement through the ranks, planning, and administration - is an outgrowth of that
Getting Started: The Role of the Scoutmaster in a Boy-Led Troop
Light the Fire: The Outdoor Program and the Advancement Program
Keeping It Going: Program Planning and Troop Administration
Qualities of a Scoutmaster
Do
Be
Know
Structure of a Boy Scout Troop
Patrols
New-Scout patrols
Regular patrols
Venture patrols
Patrol Leaders
- Elected by each patrol
Senior Patrol Leader
- Elected by the Troop
Patrol Leader's Council
Adult Leadership Positions in a Scout Troop
Scoutmaster
Assistant Scoutmaster(s)
Troop Committee - at least 3 members
Parents
Where Boy Scouts Come From and Where They Go
Cub Scouts
Webelos Dens
Boy Scouts
Varsity Scouting
Venturing
Sea Scouting
Boy
Led
Troop
Using
Patrol
Method
B
L
T
U
P
M
Troop Meetings
Motivating boys
Strengthening patrols
Promoting patrol spirit
Encouraging Scouts to learn and practice Scouting skills
Allowing Scouts to exercise leadership
Who plans and Runs the Troop Meetings
The Patrol Leaders Council
The Troop Meeting Plan
Preopening
Opening
Skills Instruction
Patrol Meetings
Interpatrol Activity
Closing
After the Meeting
Opening - 5 Minutes
Skills Instruction - 15 to 20 minutes
Patrol Meetings - 5 to 20 minutes
Interpatrol Activity - 15 to 20 minutes
Closing - 5 minutes
Troop Meeting Plan Resources
Scoutmaster Handbook
Troop Program Features
The Scoutmaster's Role in Troop Meetings
Video No. 1 - Before the Meeting
Discussion
Video No. 2 - After the Meeting
Discussion
Video No. 3 - Teaching the Senior Patrol Leader
Discussion
"A leader is best when people barely know he exists; not so good when people obey and acclaim him; worse when they despise him. But a good leader who talks little when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say, "We did it ourselves.'"
- Sun-Tsu
When it comes to working with boys,
what are your greatest concerns?
One of your most important challenges as Scoutmaster is to train boy leaders to run the troop by providing direction, coaching, and support. They will make mistakes now and then and will rely upon you to guide them. But only through real hands-on experience as leaders can boys learn to lead.
-
The Scoutmaster Handbook,
Chapter 3, "The Boy-Led Troop."
A Key to Troop Leadership
Leadership is often a matter of providing what is missing.
Listening
Listen to the Scouts in your Troop. Make yourself available to them during Scoutmaster conferences, on hikes and campouts, and on other occasions when they want to talk. Often they will simply be eager to share the excitement of a moment or the pride of having learned a new skill or completed a requirement. At other times they may have concerns about something happening in the troop or in their lives. Train yourself to pay attention to what they are saying and to listen without passing judgement. When you are willing to hear what they want to share, you can address issues in ways that are coherent, meaningful, and effective.
-
The Scoutmaster Handbook,
Chapter 11, "Working With Boys"
Positive Reinforcement
Matching Leadership Styles to the Needs of Scouts, Patrols and Troops
E
D
G
E
Explaining
Demonstrating
Guiding
Enabling
What Scouting Can Provide a Boy
The sense of belonging to a group
Achievement and recognition
Self-esteem
Confidence in himself
Self-discipline
Self-reliance
Healthy interactions with others
Importance and effectiveness of teamwork
-
The Scoutmaster Handbook,
Chapter 11, "Working With Boys"
Video No. 4 - Patrol Leaders' Council
Discussion
Video No. 5 - Activity Review
Discussion
Welcome participants
Introductions
Boy Scout Handshake
Offer the SPL support and guidance (as the meeting begins)
Sharing the Scoutmaster's Minute (at the close of the meeting)
Meeting with the SPL and PLC to assess the meeting and review next one
Full transcript