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In the Round Tower at Jhansi, June 8, 1857

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on 4 February 2014

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Transcript of In the Round Tower at Jhansi, June 8, 1857

In the Round Tower at Jhansi, June 8, 1857
History
June, 1857 - Indian mutineers murdered all European men, women and children in Jhansi
Captain Skene, his wife and a few others escaped to a
tower
The men shot at the rebels and soon the rebels began taking the tower
Skene soon realised there was no hope and shot his wife, then himself.
Analysis
Get into 5 different groups.
A hundred, a thousand to one: even so;
Not a hope in the world remained:
The swarming howling wretches below
Gained and gained and gained.


Skene looked at his pale young wife.
‘Is the time come?’—‘The time is come.’
Young, strong, and so full of life,
The agony struck them dumb.


As reported on September 5th 1857
Later, the truth discovered
Prisoners, including Skene and wife, were marched to a garden
Prisoners were then killed by sword
You have 5 minutes to read through your stanza and try and look for both language and structure.
We will then have a class discussion.
Close his arm about her now,
Close her cheek to his,
Close the pistol to her brow—
God forgive them this!


‘Will it hurt much?’ ‘No, mine own:
I wish I could bear the pang for both.’—
‘I wish I could bear the pang alone:
Courage, dear, I am not loth.’



Kiss and kiss: ‘It is not pain
Thus to kiss and die.
One kiss more.’—‘And yet one again.’—
‘Good-bye.’—‘Good-bye.’


"I retain this little poem, not as historically accurate, but as written and published before I heard the supposed facts of its first verse contradicted." She had discovered that, the Skene family had been captured and killed. Although there is still no hard evidence proving their true fate.

Here is another 'melodramatic' Victorian view of the Skenes' fate:
Create a comic strip, one image per stanzas, using quotes from the poem.
Full transcript