Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM


Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.


Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Labour Art - Gary Huck

Art/ Research Work Project

Nichelle Maginley

on 18 November 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Labour Art - Gary Huck

By: Greg & Nichelle Labor Artist Gary Huck “Cartooning is a way to make bigger points understood. It’s a bigger part of strategy, but it has a real impact – that visceral joy of ripping somebody to shreds and putting them in their place.” Gary Huck (right) The United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of America (UE) History Continued They requested the American Federation of Labor for a charter to become a union for the electrical manufacturing industry, unfortunately they were turned down
They moved forward and created their own union in March 1936 with the help of the recently established Congress of Industrial Organizations
The movement was led by Alfred Coulthard, Julius Emspak, James Matles and James Carey; eventually James Carey was elected to be the unions’ first president. During early 1930’s in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania electrical manufactures and radio assembly employees from various dominate manufacturing companies sought after the chance to have better conditions and rights as workers. History James
Carey The UE has fought for equality among all workers regardless of their craft, age, sex, nationality, race, creed, or political beliefs.
They have sought for equal wages earned for men and women and continue to fight for collective bargaining, against workplace closings and promote peace, jobs, and justice for all people Gary Huck In 1985 Gary was hired by the UE to succeed the great Fred Wright as UE cartoonist. In the 1970's Gary drew labor cartoons for the longest running labor weekly in the U.S., The Racine Labor. Hucks' works of art that made it hard for anti union employers and politicians to have certain policies go the way they wanted. For example; during a labor dispute at Connecticut’s Circuit–Wise Inc. Gary Huck spoke to the companies workers and heard what their employers refused to listen to. Creativity came to him as always Circuit-Wise Inc. employers were illustrated as the three “No Evil” monkeys; not willing to be cooperative and believing unions to be the evil. In this cartoon, Huck gives the options to compare government run institutions to scavengers In this comic strip, Gary Huck
gives us a politicians POV
however twisted it may be Generally they feed off the dead and weak in their ecosystems, this was the reference that Huck was making The G-20 summit itself is such large event with the media covering everything and the most powerful politicians in the world meeting. It is no surprise those participating are hiding behind a mask of global good will and economic stability when they are hiding their true agenda which is portrayed by the appearance as a goblin. The themes that were present in the dispute between the UE and Circuitwise inc. which were illustrated by Huck had such an impact with the public because they were so universal. Even today, on the UE website, Huck adapts the "No Union" cartoon to show that congress is so focused on deficits that they do not notice all of the jobs being lost as a result of budget cuts. This carries the same theme of those who are in power that are not willing to listen to the needs of those who do not have any, which is the main struggle that was faced prior to and during the union's strike September 11th, 1989. Thank You For Watching
THE END Bibliography -http://www.workdayminnesota.org/index.php?article_1_143
http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1499&dat=19840614&id=LGoaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=CyoEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6020,3118158 -http://www.ueunion.org/huck.html#pyxy-page-22
Full transcript