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The Civil War Era (1850-1890)

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Melissa Nollora

on 8 April 2013

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Transcript of The Civil War Era (1850-1890)

The Civil War Era
1850-1890 Genre and Style Significant Authors and Works Harriet Beecher Stowe- "Uncle Tom's Cabin"
Abraham Lincoln- "The Gettysburg Address" Historical Context and Major Events During this time, various genres were used.
Novels- Harriet Beecher Stowe, Stephen Crane
Speeches- Abraham Lincoln
Narratives- Frederick Douglass
Poems- Emily Dickinson, Frances Miles Finch
Sympathetic
Emotional
Vivid Imagery
Historical context widely influenced literature during this time and allowed it to expand in serveral different genres. Uncle Tom's Cabin Values and Beliefs by: Michelle Franklin, Nicole Johal, Melissa Nollora, and Nathan Pherigo excerpt from Chapter 1 "That is the way I should arrange the matter," said Mr. Shelby.

"I can't make trade that way--I positively can't, Mr. Shelby," said the other, holding up a glass of wine between his eye and the light.

"Why, the fact is, Haley, Tom is an uncommon fellow; he is certainly worth that sum anywhere,--steady, honest, capable, manages my whole farm like a clock."

"You mean honest, as niggers go," said Haley, helping himself to a glass of brandy.

"No; I mean, really, Tom is a good, steady, sensible, pious fellow. He got religion at a camp-meeting, four years ago; and I believe he really did get it. I've trusted him, since then, with everything I have,--money, house, horses,--and let him come and go round the country; and I always found him true and square in everything."

"Some folks don't believe there is pious niggers Shelby," said Haley, with a candid flourish of his hand, "but I do. I had a fellow, now, in this yer last lot I took to Orleans-- 't was as good as a meetin, now, really, to hear that critter pray; and he was quite gentle and quiet like. He fetched me a good sum, too, for I bought him cheap of a man that was 'bliged to sell out; so I realized six hundred on him. Yes, I consider religion a valeyable thing in a nigger, when it's the genuine article, and no mistake." Aamodt, Terrie Dopp. "Religion." American History Through Literature 1820-1870. Ed. Janet Gabler-Hover and Robert Sattelmeyer. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2006. 965-971. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 15 Jan. 2013.

"Literature: Civil War and American Letters (1850-1877)." American Eras. Detroit: Gale, 1997. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 15 Jan. 2013.

"Power of the Pen: Civil War Literature." The Civil War. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 15 Jan. 2013.

Stowe, Harriet Beecher. "Excerpt from Uncle Tom's Cabin (chapter I)." Women in America. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 21 Jan. 2013. Works Cited anti-slavery
suffering
religious and religious diversity
loss of God's presence within the human affairs "That is the way I should arrange the matter," said Mr.

"I can't make trade that way—I positively can't, Mr. Shelby," said the other, holding up a glass of wine between his eye and the light.

"Why, the fact is, Haley, Tom is an uncommon fellow; he is certainly worth that sum anywhere,—steady, honest, capable, manages my whole farm like a clock."

"You mean honest, as niggers go," said Haley, helping himself to a glass of brandy.

"No; I mean, really, Tom is a good, steady, sensible, pious fellow. He got religion at a camp-meeting, four years ago; and I believe he really did get it. I've trusted him, since then, with everything I have,—money, house, horses,—and let him come and go round the country; and I always found him true and square in everything."

"Some folks don't believe there is pious niggers Shelby," said Haley, with a candid flourish of his hand, "but I do. I had a fellow, now, in this yer last lot I took to Orleans—`t was as good as a meetin, now, really, to hear that critter pray; and he was quite gentle and quiet like. He fetched me a good sum, too, for I bought him cheap of a man that was `bliged to sell out; so I realized six hundred on him. Yes, I consider religion a valeyable thing in a nigger, when it's the genuine article, and no mistake." Uncle Toms Cabin excerpt from chapter 1 analyzed Louisa May Alcott-"Little Women" Margaret Mitchell-"Gone with the Wind" Walt Whitman-"Leaves of Grass" American Civil War 1861-1865
emancipation of slaves http://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/videos#america-divided
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