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The Awakening-Conclusion

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Julia Sill

on 29 May 2014

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Transcript of The Awakening-Conclusion

The Awakening-Conclusion
By: Kate Chopin

Falling Action
Resolution
Conclusion
Literary Devices
Works Cited
Book Maven's Blog. Banned Books: The Awakening. 2011. Web, 19 May 2014
Exposition/Climax
Setting: vacation resort off coast of New Orleans

Expo: main character Edna becomes board of her marriage and begins spending more time with a young man named Robert

Climax: Edna moves out of her husbands house and begins an affair with another man.
Julia Sill
Ms. Kineman
English Honors 10 p-7
29 May 2014

Theme
Literary Merit
Denouement
"Kate Chopin." The Awakening, , Characters, Setting, Questions. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014.

Edna continues to have affairs.
Robert returns from Mexico and they declare their love for one another.
Robert mentions marriage but Edna declines.
She returns from a friends house to find Robert gone
Edna returns to Grande Island to wind down.
She tells her friends she is going for a quick swim after dinner.
She drowns in the ocean.
Symbolism
The Ocean-

Represents both strength and weakness.
Acceptance at the cost of Independence
Society accepted women who honored their children and worshiped their husband.
Edna lived a miserable life because she wanted to be accepted.
She finally decided what she wanted was more important then what others wanted her to be.
Central Question
Is your image to society worth more than your personal independence?
We see in this novel that constantly pretending to be someone else can be deadly.
Tumbler. Np, n.d. Web. 28 May 2014
"A hundred times Edna had pictured Roberts return...step by sep she had relived every instant with him" (196-97).
"I forgot everything but a wild dream of your some way becoming my wife...You have been a very, very foolish boy, wasting your time dreaming of impossible things" (206).
"I have a good notion to go down to the beach and take a good wash and even a little swim before dinner"(218).

"The touch of the sea is sensuous, enfolding the body in its soft, yet firm embrace."
"The tears came fast to Mrs. Pontelier's face...such expieriences were not uncommon in her married life" (11).
Q:
A:
This novel was written in a time when society didn't recognize women's independence.

The author was continually ridiculed in the process of being published.
"I'm going to pull myself together for a while and think--try to determine what character of a woman I am; for, candidly, I don't know. By all the codes which I am acquainted with, I am a devilishly wicked specimen of the sex. But some way I can't convince myself that I am."
Brisbane Times. Mid-life lust. nd. Web. 14. May 2014
Encyclopaedia Britanicca. 2011. Web. 1 May 2014
The Awakening. Kate Chopin.org. nd. Web. 1 May 2014
Full transcript