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Lupus

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by

Ayeisha Snipes

on 30 September 2013

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Transcript of Lupus

Pons-Estel, Guillermo J., MD, Graciela S. Alarcon, MD, Lacie Scofield, MSPH, Leslie Reinlib, PhD, and Glinda S. Cooper, PhD. "Understanding the Epidemiology and Progression of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus." PubMed Central. National Institutes of Health, 10 Jan. 2009. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
What is Lupus?
Epidemiology
Symptoms and Diagnosis
Normal Physiology
Pathophysiology
Treatment and Prevention
Immune System
Race
Systemic lupus erythematosus, the most common form of lupus, is 2-4 times more frequent in non-white populations and is most prevalent in African American, Asian and Hispanic populations.
Gender
Lupus tends to be much more frequent in women opposed to men. However, cases in men are more likely to be more aggressive and severe.
Age
In women, there is a very large age disparity in which there is a risk to be diagnosed with Lupus.
In men, an increased risk of Lupus occurs in older ages as opposed to women.
Other factors:
Researchers have found that there is an increased risk if first degree relatives have had Lupus.
Protects the body against viruses, germs, and bacteria
Lymphoid organs contain a great deal of white blood cells and lymphocytes (T-cells and B-cells)
B-cells make antibodies that work against the "foreign invaders"
T-cells control immune responses or they fight directly against cells (i.e. cancer cells)
Fatigue
fever
Joint Stiffness
Butterfly- shaped rash
Cheeks and bridge of nose
Malar rash
Skin lesions
Raynaud's phenomenon
fingers or toes that turn blue or white
Shortness of breath
chest pain
dry eyes
headaches, confusion, memory loss
Pregnant women can have miscarriage.
There is no cure for SLE. The goal of treatment is to control the symptoms.

Mild disease may be treated with:
•Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs)
•Corticosteroid creams
•Antimalaria drug and low-dose corticosteroids

Severe lupus may include:
•High-dose corticosteroids to decrease the immune system response
•Cytotoxic drugs

Prevention:
There is currently no way to prevent lupus.
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a long-term autoimmune disorder that may affect the skin, joints, kidneys, brain, and other organs.

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease, which means the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. This leads to long-term (chronic) inflammation.
Bibliography
Staff, Mayo Clinic. "Symptoms." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 26 Oct. 2011. Web. <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/lupus/DS00115/DSECTION=symptoms>.
Attacking Foreign Invaders
blood test
Inflammation
pain
heat
redness
swelling
loss of function
at a particular place in the body
weight loss
blood clots
hair loss in spots
heartburn
stomach pain
There are two types of cells, "self" and "nonself".
Self- the body's own cells
Nonself- alien cells
When the immune system recognizes a nonself cell, it initiates an attack
"How Is Lupus Diagnosed." LUPUS FOUNDATION OF AMERICA. Lupus Foundation of America, Inc, n.d. Web. <http://www.lupus.org/webmodules/webarticlesnet/templates/new_learndiagnosing.aspx?articleid=2240>.
Ayeisha Snipes
Saahj Gosrani
Grace Sasser
Ace Motas
Cherise McManus
"Slideshow: A Visual Guide to Understanding Lupus." Pictures of Lupus: Rash, Symptoms, Joint Pain, Tests, and Treatments. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Feb. 2013. <http://lupus.webmd.com/ss/slideshow-lupus-overview>.
"Health Guide." Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. N.p., n.d. Web. <http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/systemic-lupus-erythematosus/overview.html>.
Lupus
Yazdany, Jinoos. "15 Questions with Dr. Jinoos Yazdany - "Ask the Doctor" - Understand More about Your Lupus during Lupus Awareness Month." LUPUS FOUNDATION OF AMERICA. Lupus Foundation of America, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013.
Production of interferon alpha.
Activation of T-cells and B-cells.
The autoantibodies created attack the patient's own tissues, causing inflammation and abnormal blood vessels.
The reason for the inflammatory response is unclear.
Ginzler, Ellen, MD, and Jean Tayar, MD. "ACR Logo." Patient Education. American College of Rheumatology, Feb. 2013. Web. 28 Feb. 2013.
Niewold, Timothy B., Daniel N. Clark, Rafah Salloum, and Brian D. Poole. "Interferon Alpha in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus." Interferon Alpha in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 22 Jan. 2010. Web. 28 Feb. 2013.
Bertsias, George, Ricard Cervera, and Dimitrios T. Boumpas. "Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Pathogenesis and Clinical Features." Eular. Eular, 21 Apr. 2012. Web. 28 Feb. 2013.
In SLE, the immune system produces antigens against itself. It is triggered by unknown environmental factors.
Full transcript