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World Economic Forum - Official Programme

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Transcript of World Economic Forum - Official Programme

Please click forward to proceed. PROCESS Studio sessions are designed for experts to provide participants with a deeper understanding of a new, emerging or complex topic. State of the art technology
is used to showcase an unlimited array of fascinating topics. To enhance the experience, Studio sessions are informal, in an intimate setting using captivating visuals to engage the audience. One speaker opens the session by welcoming participants, framing the topic, outlining the key objectives and briefly introducing the other speaker. Visuals may be used to set the scene. (5 minutes)

Each speaker provides their personal perspective on the topic using compelling visuals and managing his/her own time, allocating time. Time is also allocated to engage the audience. (35 minutes)

One speaker concludes the discussion, highlighting the key takeaways and bringing the discussion to a close. (5 minutes) PANEL The panellist opens the session by welcoming participants, framing the topic and outlining the key objectives. Visuals may be used to set the scene. (5 minutes)

The panellist presents for 25 minutes using compelling visuals. At least 10 minutes is allocated for discussion with the audience. (35 minutes)

The panellist concludes the discussion, highlighting the key takeaways and bringing the session to a close. (5 minutes) The stucture of Studio sessions is flexible. There are typically two types of sessions: SOLO 45 minutes, with either one (solo) or two (duo) panellists.
75 minutes, with three or more panellists and a moderator. In the first 5 minutes, the moderator (if applicable) or a chosen panellist opens the session by welcoming participants, framing the topic, highlighting the key question and briefly introducing the panellists. Visuals may be used to set the scene.

Each panellist provides his/her personal perspective on the topic and manages his/her own time, allocating time for presentation and Q&A with the audience. Visuals are used.

The session is then opened to a panel discussion, followed by a general Q&A with the audience.

The moderator takes the final 5 minutes of the session to conclude the discussion, highlighting the key takeaways and responses to the core question and bringing the discussion to a close. DUO ROLES A panel session typically involves over three panellists and a moderator.

The moderator is responsible for introducing and ending the session as scheduled.

Panellists usually have 8 to 10 minutes to present, leading to a lively discussion among the panellists, and engaging participants as often as possible. DUO In a duo scenario, two panellists present related topics. These sessions allow for an insightful interaction between the two panellists as well as with the audience. Solo sessions allow one panellist to share his/her personal insights and expertise on a particular topic using an in-depth and exciting presentation. SOLO PANEL To enhance the experience for participants, Studio sessions are held in an intimate environment. Participants are seated close to the panel to encourage and facilitate interaction and Q&As.

Technicians use sound and light to create different effects and to intensify the impact of presentations. ENVIRONMENT TOOLS The lighting in the room can be adapted to create the right atmosphere for dynamic presentations. SCREEN LIGHTING CLICKER If requested, panellists are given a clicker that will signal to the technician when to change to the next image.
Each panellist is given a tie microphone, allowing them to move freely in front of the screen. Cordless microphones are also distributed by hostesses for questions from the audience.
SOUND A state-of-the-art sound system is available in the room to enhance the experience if required. MICROPHONES The Studio room has a 9x3 metre screen, which uses the “Picture in Picture” (PiP) technology. This technology can display a full-screen image (moving or static) at the same time as one or more other inset images (moving or static).

The sequencing and animation of visuals for each presentation is prepared in advance in coordination with the Forum programme manager and a team of technicians. This requires content to be provided at least one month before the session. Sample session structure - Solo: Sample session structure - Panel: Sample session structure - Duo: DOWNLOADS loading, please wait... Please click forward to proceed. The goal of the IdeasLab is to create an informal but well-structured environment where powerful ideas and concepts can be presented by leading intellectuals and entrepreneurs in a visually stimulating and highly interactive format.
The IdeasLab is run in
two main parts - “ ” and “ ”:
Participants split into groups with the discussion leader of their choice. They explore the challenges and opportunities that arise from implementing the ideas that were presented in the first part of the session. IdeasLabs are divided into four parts: 1. Facilitator introduction - 5 minutes
2. Presentations by discussion leaders - 5 minutes each
3. Group discussion - 20 minutes
4. Synthesis - 10 minutes PROCESS ROLES FACILITATOR Manages the flow of the session by introducing the presentations and briefly collects reactions from the participants in the first half of the session

Guides participants through a group exercise in the second half
Plays a critical role in making the IdeasLab a success – therefore he/she must devote a significant amount of time for preparation in advance of the event as well as participate in a rehearsal on site To support the spirit and flow of the IdeasLab and to facilitate interaction among participants, the set-up of the room is flexible and is adapted to support the process as the session advances. ENVIRONMENT During the smaller group discussions, up to 10 participants gather around the discussion leader of their choice.

A whiteboard is available to capture key insights from the discussion. During the introduction and presentations of the ideas, the facilitator and presenter stand at the front of the room while participants are seated theatre-style. In the synthesis and concluding part of the session, all participants gather around each whiteboard for a brief report from the respective groups. TOOLS Discussion leaders use the Pecha Kucha format® for their presentations.

Pecha Kucha® guidelines:

Powerpoint (please use template provided) or Prezi presentation (www.prezi.com)

15 individual images, 20 seconds each

Use of videos in PowerPoint presentations is discouraged but, should you choose to use one, please choose hi-resolution WMV, MPEG or AVI. Before sending, please check that the quality of the film is acceptable when played FULL SCREEN on a WINDOWS laptop

Avoid text, no bullet points

High resolution images-100 pixels/dpi (dots per inch) recommended

No branding, no introduction and conclusion slides

Please do not change the slide master in the template provided and leave the background white IdeasLabs may be filmed and made available on the World Economic Forum website. VIDEOS Whiteboards are available to capture key insights and conclusions during group discussions.

A graphic artist captures the main insights from presentations and outcomes from the discussions (optional). SCREEN AND PROMPTER PECHA KUCHA® WHITEBOARDS PRESENTATION: The presentation is projected onto a large screen behind the discussion leader. A prompter is available in front of the discussion leader to indicate when slides change. DOWNLOADS Sample session structure: Pecha Kucha® template: IdeasLab at the "Summer Davos"
in Asia 2009: IdeasLab at Annual Meeting 2009: IdeasLab at Annual Meeting 2010: Prepare and present a Pecha Kucha® presentation. See “tools” for detailed instructions on preparation involved

Help to engage participants in the group discussion in the second half of the session

Must devote a significant amount of time for preparation in advance of the event as well as participate in a rehearsal on site DISCUSSION LEADERS Innovations, trends and concepts are presented in a special format called Pecha Kucha®. This presentation is given by up to five discussion leaders. GLOSSARY An active role in a WorkSpace, Workshop or IdeasLab session
The facilitator is expected to facilitate the process of the given session
Is engaged at an early stage of the session development process and may be called upon to co-design the session with the Forum’s session responsible
Ideally, the facilitator combines subject matter knowledge with wide experience at facilitating processes. A member of the Programme Development Team, responsible for developing the content of a session in collaboration with experts on the subject matter and/or Forum internal stakeholders. He/she is responsible for setting the objectives and creating the session structure, briefing the moderator or facilitator of the session and making sure that he/she receives all the necessary information in time to brief the panellists and/or discussion leaders. The different actors that play an active part in a session. Typically these are moderator or facilitator and the panellists or discussion leaders. There are ad hoc roles, such as “Challenger”, “Special Address” or “With” that refer to specific tasks that participants may be invited to perform in a session. FORUM
SESSION
RESPONSIBLE CHAIR MODERATOR An active speaking role in a Plenary, TV Debate or WEB session
During the session, the Chair plays a key role in engaging the panellists and the participants in a lively discussion, keeps the flow and the timing of the session and summarizes key points and insights at the end of the session FACILITATOR ROLES An active speaking role in a plenary or a panel. A panellist is a renowned expert in his/her field, gives his/her views through unprepared questions from the moderator and the participants and interacts with the rest of the panellists, as needed. An active role in a panel or a meal
During the session, the moderator plays a key role in engaging both the panellists and the participants in a lively discussion, maintains the flow and the timing of the session and summarizes key points and insights at the end of the session
PANELLIST An expert on a given topic affiliated either with a university or think-tank or a renowned author who closely collaborates with the Forum’s Programme Development Team on session topics and content. Also referred to as the session flow, the process describes the different phases into which a session is divided, giving detailed timings of each phase. SCENE SETTER See “scene setter” description. VISUALS A device that allows early engagement of the participants by presenting them with questions, and multiple choice answers in connection with the session content. The participants reply by pressing the suitable number in the portable device. Results are shown on a screen and are integrated into the discussion by the moderator, who may decide to gear the conversation in a slightly different direction on the basis of this input. Pictures, images, videos or graphs showing hard data related to the topic of the session, which serve to set the scene or create the appropriate mood in panels. They are shown before the start of the session while participants enter the room and are switched off as soon as the session starts, to avoid interfereing with the session flow. VOTING
DEVICE FACULTY PROCESS Also known as the Moderator’s Handbook. A set of principles and guidelines intended to brief and equip moderators and facilitators of Annual Meetings’ sessions with all the necessary information and best practices to successfully carry out their task. MODERATOR/FACILITATOR CHECKLIST PROGRAMME
DEVELOPMENT
TEAM (PDT) DISCUSSION
LEADER TOOLS A member of the Programme Development Team managing the administrative and logistics process for Faculty invited to a Forum meeting. A document developed by the session responsible with content experts’ and Moderator’s input that gives detailed information about the session objectives and discussion points, format, setting, flow and timings, as well as the specifics about the moderator and speakers’ roles. FACULTY
MANAGER The Forum’s team in charge of developing the official programmes of the Annual Meeting in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, and the Annual Meeting of the New Champions in the People’s Republic of China. An active speaking role in a WorkSpace, aworkshop, IdeasLab or meal
The discussion leader is expected to guide the discussion at a table or breakout group, provide input from his/her own experience and report the outcomes of his/her group to the rest of the participants SESSION
STRUCTURE Any physical, electronic or virtual device needed to carry out and implement the format of a session (screen, whiteboard, colour pens, flipchart, etc.) It describes the set-up and atmosphere of the session room which is designed to serve the objectives of the session format. A member of the Programme Development Team responsible for developing the Forum’s Annual Meetings public programme sessions.

He/she collaborates actively with global experts and internal stakeholders to shape the annual global agenda through a blend of public sessions bringing together breakthrough trends and innovations and Forum constituents’ main projects and interests. ENVIRONMENT FORUM
PROGRAMME
MANAGER Please click on the
in which you are participating:
session format Official Programme Guide The WorkSpace is a collaborative environment that engages participants in a highly interactive process
designed to tackle a complex issue. Through multimedia and other smart tools, the WorkSpace fosters
accelerated learning, allowing large groups to come together, learn from a rich experience and make
informed, creative choices. It draws out the collective intellect and creative capabilities of participants
to explore concrete opportunities for improving the state of the world.

What is it? A results-driven collaboration zone

Stakeholders come together in the WorkSpace to share and develop:
Original thinking and insights
New tools, frameworks and models
Innovative solutions and action plans
No WorkSpace is the same. The structure and flow
of the session is co-designed with the facilitator using
a range of creative methods and modules to meet
the objectives of the session. Participants can be pre-invited to sessions as active participants without taking on a specific role. Like all participants, they are
expected to engage actively, share personal experiences and bring new insights and opinions to the discussions. ENVIRONMENT TOOLS The WorkSpace is the most interactive session of the World Economic Forum. To enhance collaboration in a creative environment, a large range of tools can be used to facilitate the different exercises within the same session.

The WhiteWalls, Hypertiles™, scribing tools, computers, lighting, movable work stations, rolling chairs, plasma screens and sound systems all have their importance in the design of the session.

Here are a few examples: The Workspace environment is flexible, easy to move around in, dynamic, comfortable, pleasant, light and unique. The space is consciously designed and configured to support and facilitate the session process with mobile white walls and other furniture.
PROCESS Sample session structure: One-pager: Video: DOWNLOADS Please click forward to proceed. TV Debates are designed to provide strategic insights and raise awareness of important trends by broadcasting the discussion to a global audience. They are aired by the Partner hosting the debate. There are no speeches; rather, brief remarks set the context and integrate various points of view.

TV Debates are co-designed in close collaboration with the media Partner hosting the debate.

Please click forward to proceed. ROLES TOOLS ENVIRONMENT PROCESS DOWNLOADS TV Debates settings induce proximity and dialogue and make for intimate discussions with high interaction from the audience.

Two different settings:

Panelists are seated on stools or chairs placed directly on the floor next to the audience either in a roundrect or in a semi-roundrect

Panelists are seated on armchairs on a large stage. The Moderator is standing and walking around


In both cases, the Moderator is standing and walking around, thus enhancing dynamism and interaction between the audience and the panelists Sample session structure: Sessions over meals differ from traditional session formats.
They provide an informal, interactive and off-the-record
setting to discuss and debate a range of topics, as well as
a great opportunity to network. Please click forward to proceed. LUNCHES Dinner sessions are held in a more relaxed environment. Topics over dinner can be both conventional and unconventional, where creative ideas can be explored and new insights emerge. DINNERS Lunches can be more formal than dinners and are therefore more suitable for conventional topics and discussions. The moderator opens the session by welcoming participants, framing the topic, briefly introducing discussion leaders and mentioning their commitment to answer the core question (defined in the session structure document); the first course is on the table at the start of the session

The moderator invites each of the discussion leaders to respond to an initial question in their own words (this can vary depending on co-design with moderator and Forum programme manager of session structure)

Each discussion leader has 3-4 minutes to respond

Following these introductory remarks, the moderator asks a follow-on question for participants to discuss around their table with the discussion leaders

After the main course, the moderator invites each table to share highlights and insights from their table discussion – this can be the discussion leader or another participant

Finally, the moderator asks each discussion leader for closing remarks (in no more than 1 minute) before the moderator summarizes the key takeaways from the session linking back to the core question

The moderator brings the discussion to a close at the scheduled time PROCESS ROLES
Are invited to share their personal insights and expertise on a particular topic as outlined in the session structure document

Follow the direction of the moderator in terms of session flow, speaking order and time management

Approach the topic in an informal, conversational style, keeping comments brief and on topic (no prepared presentations)

Keep comments concise (3-4 minutes)

Help to facilitate discussions at their respective table DISCUSSION LEADERS Is entrusted to follow the session structure document as closely as possible and to brief the discussion leaders on their respective roles and possible questions

Is responsible for ensuring the session objectives are met, and for starting and ending the session as scheduled

Manages the flow of the session by first introducing the topic and the discussion leaders, and opening with a question to the discussion leaders or an invitation for brief opening comments from each; this can vary depending on co-design with moderator and Forum programme manager of session structure document in preparation phase

Sets the spirit and ambiance of the meal from the outset

Facilitates a dialogue among the discussion leaders and engages other participants as much as possible

Closes the session by highlighting key insights and conclusions in response to the initial question and session objective MODERATOR The set up of meals can vary depending on the venue.
Tables may be round or rectangular, and the number of
participants can range from 20 to 120 participants.

Check with the Forum programme manager for
more information about the venue. This is
important as it can impact the structure and flow
of the session. ENVIRONMENT There are no presentations at meals. If you require technical equipment or other special tools to enhance the meal, please discuss this well in advance with the Forum programme manager. TOOLS Several cordless microphones are available in the room.
One for the moderator and the rest for the discussion leaders
that can be passed around as needed. SCREEN OR
LCD PROJECTOR MICROPHONES DOWNLOADS Sample session structure: Plenary and interactive sessions are designed to provide strategic insights and raise global awareness on important trends and themes. They can also provide an in-depth understanding about new, emerging or complex issues in various domains. Please click forward to proceed. PROCESS Is entrusted to follow the session structure document as closely as possible and to brief the panel on their respective roles and possible questions

Is responsible for ensuring the session’s objectives are met and starting and ending the session as scheduled

Manages the flow of the session by first introducing the topic and the panellists, and opening with a question to the panel or an invitation for brief opening comments from each

Facilitates a dialogue among the panellists and engages the audience as much as possible

Closes the session by highlighting key insights and conclusions from the session in response to the initial question and session objective MODERATOR ROLES Are invited to share their personal insights and expertise on a particular topic as outlined in the session structure document

Follow the direction of the moderator in terms of session flow, speaking order and time management (no prepared presentations)

Approach the topic in an informal, conversational style, keeping comments brief and on topic

Along with the moderator, should expand the discussion to include questions and comments from the floor as early as possible PANELLISTS TOOLS As the participants walk into the room, key statistics and facts may be shown on the screens above or next to the panel. SCREEN In some cases, the moderator may have a tie microphone to allow him/her to run the session while standing. In some panel sessions, a voting device is available. When prompted by the moderator, the audience is able to vote on questions that have been prepared jointly by Forum staff and the moderator. Translation sets are distributed to the participants and panellists when simultaneous translation is available. While presentations are not encouraged, one or several screens are generally available to display visuals as scene setters for the topic of discussion as well as for close-ups of the panel. SCENE SETTERS MICROPHONE TRANSLATION The moderator and panellists have fixed microphones. Cordless microphones are also available and distributed by hostesses for questions from the audience. VOTING DEVICES The moderator and panellists are seated on a stage, close to the participants. The environment is designed to encourage interactivity and participation from the audience.

Panellists remain seated throughout the session, but moderators can choose to stand and walk around the stage or the room. ENVIRONMENT The moderator opens the session by welcoming participants, framing the topic, briefly introducing panellists and mentioning their commitment to answer the core question (defined in the session structure document).

The moderator invites each of the panellists to respond to an initial question in their own words.

Each panellist has 3-4 minutes to do so.

Following these introductory remarks, the moderator draws out the main points and facilitates an interactive discussion among the panellists.

With 20 minutes left, the moderator invites brief questions from the floor, asking audience members to identify themselves before asking a question.

Finally, the moderator takes 5 minutes before the end of the session to conclude the discussion, highlighting the key takeaways and responses to the core question.

The moderator brings the discussion to a close at the scheduled time.
Sample session structure: DOWNLOADS The World Economic Brainstorming (WEB) is a high-level session that brings together leading experts from business, governments, universities and NGOs. The WEB sessions often open or close World Economic Forum meetings to define the key issues at the meeting or identify key priorities and takeaways from the meeting. Please click forward to proceed. 8 The Chair opens the session by welcoming participants, introducing the topic and giving a detailed explanation of the process ahead.
Facilitated conversation at each table with discussion leaders (30 minutes)
After self-introductions and the nomination of a facilitator, the discussion leaders are invited to offer their views on the WEB question (2 minutes each):
For 20 minutes, table discussion on the group's response to the WEB question. The table compiles a list up to 10 keywords or less for submission online by Forum staff
For 30 minutes, tables report back on their answer to the WEB question as selected submissions are shown on screen to the large group.
For 10 minutes, the chair presents a Tag Cloud of the table answers (projected on BARCO screens)
Wrap-up and closing comments from selected discussion leaders.
Chair to summarize, make final conclusions, thank all participants and bring the session to an end.
7 6 2 1 5 4 PROCESS 3 (1h30 min.) ROLES DISCUSSION LEADERS Each table is made up of up to three discussion leaders, all leading experts in their domain, who share their views to get the discussion going. Any participant is invited to take a seat at their chosen table. Each table chooses a facilitator (not Forum staff) who manages the flow of the table discussion and reports back to the larger group if requested. Kicks off the session by giving a brief introduction of the topic and explaining the World Economic Brainstorming process, devices and session flow, as well as the different tasks that discussion leaders will be asked to do throughout the session

Facilitates the group discussion by giving the floor to the different tables’ discussion leaders to report on their group’s findings, and by reporting aggregated results through a “tag cloud” shown on a BARCO screen

Summarizes and draws out the main conclusions and brings the session to a close

WEB's chairs are well-known Media Leaders from Forum's media Partners CHAIR TABLE FACILITATOR WEB sessions are usually held in the main session room at a Forum meeting in an informal setting with round tables of up to 12 people to facilitate dialogue in small groups.

The facilitator can walk around the session room.
ENVIRONMENT TIE MICROPHONE Tools are used to capture, synthesize and visualize key takeaways from group discussions, for example, tag or word "clouds”. For tag clouds, participants are asked to provide keywords/phrases for a topic/issue. All input is collected in the form of a "collective micro-blog" and then used to generate a word cloud where the most frequently expressed words are given the greatest prominence. VOTING DEVICE SCREEN A tie microphone is provided to the chair to allow for greater movement during the session. LAPTOPS A main screen at the centre of the room allows questions and results to be shown to the participants. A voting device may be provided for each table to cast their vote on answers from a list of multiple choice answers, thus allowing instant polling among the participants. TAG CLOUDS & OTHER TOOLS WIRELESS
MICROPHONES A member of Forum staff may summarize the results of the table discussion and submit them via a laptop. Wireless microphones are available to hand around the tables to engage participants in the room-wide discussions or feedback. As part of the WEB sessions, a graphic recorder may take note of the main key words and conclusions drawn during the proceedings. SCRIBE TOOLS Sample session structure: DOWNLOADS VIDEO CAMERA Hypertiles are A3 rectangles of flexible magnetic material. They are covered on one side with a sticky surface. Large sheets of paper can be adhered to this surface. HYPERTILES MUSIC Music plays an important role in facilitating the session flow.
It is a signal that enhances the participant's movements around
the room when appropriate. A knowledge object is an audio, visual or tactile object that opens
up the WorkSpace session’s given challenge and gives insight into potential solutions to that problem. Knowledge objects are multimedia, thus catering to the different levels and methods of learning of participants. KNOWLEDGE OBJECTS Walls are the main support used to collect
and capture participants' discussions and
outcomes from group activities/discussions.
They also serve as a physical structure that can be moved around to modify the session room. WHITE WALLS This large wall serves as a kiosk. All sorts of information may be posted on the wall. Photographs, coloured art work and diagrams are also posted here. Articles from magazines or the Internet are also displayed for participants to browse through. Information is not displayed haphazardly; rather, a layout is thoughtfully designed, making the wall a structured information event. KNOWLEDGE WALL http://bit.ly/alrbgn http://bit.ly/aG4bAE http://bit.ly/bJTASI http://bit.ly/bJtb9H http://bit.ly/bnvxlp http://bit.ly/d5jamN http://bit.ly/bIzH1U http://bit.ly/brkrXe Although the WorkSpace sessions are usually not recorded, a video camera is used to focus the attention of the participants on a particular moment or discussion outcome captured during the session. MODERATOR
The moderator is a world-renowned presenter from the media Partner hosting the TV debate.

Co-designs the session in close collaboration with the programme and media team's session responsible and engages in its development at an early stage

Conducts a lively and interactive debate with the panellists and fosters interaction among panellists

Engages the audience at an early stage by opening the floor to Q&A

Closes the session by highlighting key insights and conclusions in response to the initial question and session objective PANELLISTS
Are invited to share their personal insights and expertise on a particular topic as outlined in the session structure

Follow the direction of the moderator in terms of session flow, speaking order and time management (no prepared presentations)

Approach the topic in an informal, conversational style, keeping comments brief and on topic

Along with the moderator, should expand the discussion to include questions and comments from the floor as early as possible. OTHER ROLES Depending on the session structure flow, both panellists and selected participants may be asked to take on a specific role, either as advocator, challenger or other of a given point of view. The moderator opens the session by welcoming participants, framing the topic, briefly introducing panellists and mentioning their commitment to answer the core question (defined in the session structure document).

The moderator invites each of the panellists to respond to an initial question in their own words.

Each panellist has 3-4 minutes to respond.

Following these introductory remarks, the moderator draws out the main points and facilitates an interactive discussion among the panellists.

With 15 minutes left, the moderator invites brief questions from the floor, asking participants to identify themselves before asking a question.

Finally, the moderator takes 5 minutes before the end of the session to conclude the discussion, highlighting the key takeaways and responses to the core question.

The moderator brings the discussion to a close at the scheduled time.

On the basis of each particular session structure, new parts can be added to the above process. SCREEN While presentations are not encouraged, one or several screens are generally available to display visuals or close-ups of the panellists. TV CAMERAS MICROPHONES The moderator and panellists have tie microphones. Cordless microphones are also available and distributed by hostesses for questions from participants. FACEBOOK QUESTION The session responsible in collaboration with the media Partner moderator may choose to reach out to Internet users through social media engagement. The main question of the session structure is then broadcast through Facebook. Panellists receive immediate feedback and the outcomes of the survey can be integrated into the general discussion. http://bit.ly/almV9f The facilitator opens the session by welcoming participants, framing the topics, highlighting the key question and briefly introducing the discussion leaders

The facilitator gives the floor to the various discussion leaders to make introductory remarks and/or explain the assignment that the breakout groups will be working on

Discussion leaders facilitate discussions in their respective breakout groups and ensure the completion of the given assignment, taking notes of key findings

Discussion leaders report back to the group the outcome of their breakout discussions

The facilitator summarizes the key points and brings the session to an end Workshop sessions are designed to facilitate interaction among discussion
leaders and participants to address a challenge or explore complex issues.

The goal is to create a hands-on atmosphere in which participants actively
work together to answer a core question as defined in the session structure.

These sessions are facilitated and off-the-record group discussions that focus
on providing structured interventions from discussion leaders, capturing direct
feedback from participants and building consensus on priorities and solutions. Please click forward to proceed. PROCESS ROLES Workshops are set up to create a conducive working environment where interaction and creativity are enhanced.

The room has round tables of up to 10 people. There is a flipchart available to capture the conversations and that are used to report back to the group. ENVIRONMENT TOOLS DOWNLOADS Sample session structure: Several cordless microphones are available in the room. MICROPHONES Depending on the session objectives, different creative tools may be incorporated into the group assignments. These tools may include knowledge objects (newspaper articles, etc.), colour post-its, cards or group nameplates. CREATIVE TOOLS If PowerPoint presentations are required, a screen or LCD projector is available in the room.
Presentations in Workshops are not permitted. SCREEN OR LCD PROJECTOR Manages the flow of the session, stimulates lively, interactive conversations around the content and facilitates multiple groups working in parallel

Plays a critical role in delivery of the Workshop – therefore he/she must devote a significant amount of time for preparation in advance of the event FACILITATOR Anchor the conversation in working groups (usually 8-10 people) either by sharing their expertise or by putting forward the business view or view of their organization

Guide participants in a group exercise on the topic at hand and report a synthesis of the discussions from their group DISCUSSION LEADERS PARTICIPANTS Play a key role in the session, as they contribute actively in the group discussions and their input is reflected in the final report
A notetaker may be appointed at the beginning of the breakout group discussion to facilitate the discussion leader’s task of reporting back to the rest of the group http://bit.ly/cBNQZY http://tiny.cc/qp0ua http://tiny.cc/v5acm http://tiny.cc/14cdi http://tiny.cc/yc1at http://tiny.cc/0l71a http://tiny.cc/210fx MODERATOR
CHECKLIST Thank you for accepting the role of moderator. This is a central role in Forum sessions, and you will potentially find yourself at the heart of a lively, productive and sometimes groundbreaking debate. The success of sessions is in great part dependent on the quality of the moderation, and we want to ensure you have all the tools you need to be well prepared.

Whether it be for a one-hour session, a working lunch or dinner, or even a two-hour workshop, here are some key elements to help guide you through the meanders of moderating: - Forum staff will contact you to go over and modify this structure
- Use this as a guide to build on with the Forum person responsible for the session, the “session responsible”
- Don’t hesitate to interrupt off-topic and lingering discussions or speeches
- Make sure everyone has equal speaking time
- Ensure an ongoing discussion, not a procession of set-piece interventions You will receive a session structure from the organizers, with a breakdown of how the time is to be allocated.




Please e-mail the session structure to the panellists, allowing enough time before the event, using the contact information provided in the structure






Make sure you are familiar with background materials and bios of the different panellists.

Be comfortable with the subject as it is presented in the session. - Outline key facts on your session topic
- Share ideas about how you want to run the session
- Get feedback and questions from the panellists
- If possible, organize calls with each panellists - Critical: remind everyone that the session is on/off the record (whichever is the case for your session)
- State your will for a lively discussion and debate
- Emphasize time constraints and your intention to be a firm timekeeper
- Set the context, inform those new to the topic, and throw out challenging questions Preparation - Provide a short summary of the discussion
- Thank your panel and the participants
- If there is a summary writer, make sure he/she has captured the key discussion points - 5 minutes before the Q&A, inform the participants of their upcoming opportunity to ask questions
- Ensure that the time allocated to Q&A is respected Please arrive in your session room 20 minutes before the session to meet session responsibles and conduct one last briefing with all of the panellists

Your opening remarks will be very important in setting the tone of the discussion (no more than 5 minutes)





Actively guide the session’s content and timing




Enable an interactive Q&A session



Wrap up the session On site TM Ideas Lab ROLES FACILITATOR Is supported by a team of knowledge workers
Manages the flow of the session and stimulates conversations around the content
Guides participants through a variety of design-oriented tasks to reach a common objective; knowledge and expertise on the topic is important KEY ACTIVE PARTICIPANTS PARTICIPANTS Participants are the main actors in the WorkSpace, working together as peers. (With up to 15 listed per session)
Some WorkSpace sessions may require experts to take on the role of breakout group discussion leader. Discussion leaders:
Share their expertise and experience on a particular issue
Keep the group stays focused on the task at hand, ensuring equal, peer-to-peer exchange among team members and bringing out the best thinking of each participant DISCUSSION LEADERS Facilitate the flow of the process
Manage the dynamic environment
Research each issue to ensure a knowledge-rich experience
Capture the work done real-time
KNOWLEDGE WORKERS
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