Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

To Kill a Mockingbird - The symbolism of the mockingbird

No description
by

Merlena Rudy

on 27 February 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of To Kill a Mockingbird - The symbolism of the mockingbird

Tom Robinson
Tom could be seen as a mockingbird who has been wrongfully accused. He was innocent, yet assumed guilty, ultimately because of his race. Moreover, when Tom was accused it wasn't solely his innocence that was taken, but also his reputation and security. Through Tom Robinson, Lee portrays the "underdog" being destroyed because of his race.

"Tom was a dead man the minute Mayella Ewell opened her mouth and screamed." (241)
~Scout

Jem Finch
Contrary to Tom Robinson, Jem is far from an "underdog" in the town of Maycomb. He comes from a well-to do family, with a good reputation. Furthermore, he is of a white race, which distinguishes him from the Negroes. Nevertheless, To Kill a Mockingbird also symbolizes how those of a "higher class" can also be affected.

" I always thought Maycomb folk were the best kind of folks in world, least that's what they seemed like." (215)
~Jem
Jem Finch
Jem has grown up with the perspective that those of Maycomb are kind and generous people. Regardless, as Jem matures, he discovers that his fantasies are false. Jem, like Tom, is innocent. Despite being sheltered from the cruelty of the world, he learns of it eventually. His childhood perspectives are shattered when he sees how Tom is treated. Additionally, after witnessing the injustice of racism he is another victim, his innocence being destroyed.

" Because they don't bother you." (238)
~ Jem
Arthur "Boo" Radley
Boo Radley can been seen as the mockingbird in many ways. The first being how he is harmless, yet plays the victim of cruelty and hatred because of the rumors spread around Maycomb. Furthermore, he is never given a chance to defend his reputation nor his actions. From another sense, mockingbirds
do not have their own song to sing, so they imitate other birds. This demonstrates how the mockingbird makes itself present through other birds. In a similar way, Boo Radley is seen through the eyes of others in Maycomb and does not actually have a character of his own. The reader only knows what the people say and assumed about Boo, which as we later discover is false.
Analysis of the Symbolism of the Mockingbird in
The Mockingbird's Symbolism
The mockingbird in Harper Lee's novel
To Kill a Mockingbird
is a symbol of many things, however, most prominently about the ways in which harm, racism and injustice can destroy those who are innocent. Lee represents the mockingbird throughout the novel with a diverse selection of characters.
Arthur "Boo" Radley
Mr. Dolphus Raymond
Mr. Dolphus Raymond is a white man who prefers living among black folks because he is tired of the hypocrisy of the white society. He pretends to be an alcoholic so that people understand why he behaves the way he does. He too, is a mockingbird due to the amount of racism, prejudice and hatred in their society restricting him to live the way he wants to, without an explanation.
Mr. Dolphus Raymond is a white man who prefers living among black folks because he is tired of the hypocrisy of the white society. He pretends to be an alcoholic so that people understand why he behaves the way he does. He too, is a mockingbird due to the amount of racism, prejudice and hatred in their society. It is socially restricting him to live the way he wants to, without an explanation. Moreover, he is an unusual case as he, a well-to do white man, is not racist towards the black community.

" You never really understand a person until you climb into his skin and walk around in it." (30)
~ Atticus
Mr. Dolphus Raymond
" If there's just one kind of folks, why can't they get along with each other? If they're all alike, why do they go out of their way to despise each other?...I'm beginning to understand why Boo Radley's stayed shut up in the house all this time...it's because he
wants
to stay inside." (227)
~ Jem
" Mockingbird's don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy...that's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." (90)
~ Miss Maudie Atkinson
Mr. Dolphus Raymond
" Cry about the hell white people give coloured folks, without even stopping to think that they're people too." (201)
~ Mr. Dolphus Raymond
Conclusion
The mockingbird in Harper Lee's
To Kill A Mockingbird
symbolizes how even the most innocent people can be destroyed by racism, prejudice, assumptions and accusations. The mockingbirds all bring out the sense of morality in people. Sometimes the unwritten social behaviors and beliefs dictate the ignorance of a true sense of morality.

" They're certainly entitled to think that, and they're entitled to full respect for their opinions... but before I can live with other folks I've got to live with myself. The one thing that doesn't abide by majority rule is a person's conscience." (105)
~Atticus

" Shoot all the bluejays you want if you can hit 'em, but remember, it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." (90)
~ Atticus

" It occurred to me that in their own way, Tom Robinson's manners were as good as Atticus'. Until my father explained it to me later, I did not understand the subtlety of Tom's predicament: he would not have dared strike a white woman under any circumstances and expect to live long, so he took the first opportunity to run--a sure sign of guilt." (195)
~Scout
" Any stealthy small crimes committed in Maycomb were his work." (9)
" When they finally saw him, why he hadn't done any of those things...he was real nice...Most people are Scout, when you finally see them." (281)
~ Scout & Atticus
"There are just some kind of men -- who're so busy worrying about the next world they've never learned to live in this one, and you can look down the street and see the results." (45)
~ Miss Maudie Atkinson
Tom Robinson

"Which, gentlemen, we know is in itself a lie as black as Tom Robinson's skin, a lie I do not have to point out to you. You know the truth, and the truth is this: some Negroes lie, some Negroes are immoral, some Negro men are not to be trusted around women—black or white. But this is a truth that applies to the human race and to no particular race of men. There is not a person in this courtroom who has never told a lie, who has never done an immoral thing, and there is no man living who has never looked upon a woman without desire." (204)
~Atticus
"When I come to town, […] if I weave a little and drink out of this sack, folks can say Dolphus Raymond's in the clutches of whiskey—that's why he won't change his ways. He can't help himself, that's why he lives the way he does." (200)
~Mr. Dolphus Raymond
" As you grow older you'll see white men cheat black men every day of your life...that white man is trash." (220)
~ Atticus
By Harper Lee
Full transcript