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The Punctuation Games

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Anna Boskie

on 25 January 2013

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Transcript of The Punctuation Games

The Punctuation Games The Tributes: Katniss Underlining and Peeta Quotations History of
Quotation Marks Until the beginning of the 18th century, quotation marks were used in England to call attention to self-righteous remarks.
In 1714, someone decided that quotations should be used to denote direct speech.
In the past, they were used to indicate in a general, left-handed marginal way that there was speech taking place.
They are also known as "inverted commas", "speech marks", or "scare quotes (single quotes)" History of Underlining Italic type was invented in the 15th century.
It is used to distinguish specific words as special.
Italics and underlining are the print equivalent to each other. Rule:
They are used for titles of books, newspapers, albums, films, etc.
Example:
I read The Hunger Games today in class.
Explanation:
The words underlined in the sentence determine the specific title of the book.
Incorrect Example:
I read this book in class today.
Explanation:
The punctuation in the sentence is incorrect because the underlining is not used to reference the specific title of the book implied. Rule #1
of Underlining Rule:
Use underlining for foreign words, letters, and figures.
*Also use them for defining examples when writing about language (CDCs are: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so)
Example:
The Hunger Games presents many unfamiliar things to the tributes such as the rare berries known as nightlock.
Explanation:
Since nightlock is an unknown berry, it needs to be underlined to emphasize its unfamiliarity.
Incorrect Example:
The Hunger Games presents many unfamiliar things to the tributes such as the rare berries known as nightlock.
Explanation:
The underlining is used incorrectly because "berries" is a describer for the foreign word and not the word itself. Rule #2 of Underlining Rule #1 of Quotation Marks Rule #2 of Quotation Marks Rule #3 and #4 of Quotation Marks Rule #5 of Quotation Marks Rule #7
of Quotation Marks Rule #6 of Quotation Marks Rule #8 of Quotation Marks Rule:
Use quotation marks to enclose a direct quotation - a person's exact words.
Example:
When talking to Caesar Flickerman, Peeta discusses his love life and how they won't have a future. He says, "Because... because... she came here with me."
Explanation:
These quotation marks are used correctly because the words inside of them are Peeta's exact words from the novel.
Incorrect Example:
Peeta tells Katniss, "he can't help with hunting because he has never hunted before."
Explanation:
The quotation marks are used incorrectly because those are not Peeta's exact words. Rule:
A direct quotation is set off from the rest of the sentence by a comma or by a question mark or an exclamation point.
Example:
"Agreed. Is it ready?" Peeta asks.
"Wait here," Katniss says.
Explanation:
The first quote includes a direct quotation set off by a question mark, while the second quotation is set off by a comma.
Incorrect Example:
"That'll be alright" he says.
Explanation:
The absence of the comma shows that the quote is not set off from the rest of the sentence like it is supposed to be. Rule #3:
Commas and periods are always place inside the closing quotation marks.
*Question marks and exclamation points are also placed inside the quotation marks
Example:
"Let's go back then, to the moment they called your sister's name at the reaping," says Caesar.
Explanation:
This quotation shows a correctly placed comma because it is inside of the quote.
Incorrect Example:
Peeta says, "Yes, frosting. The final defense of dying".
Explanation:
The period is incorrectly placed outside of the quotations, but it should be placed right after the "dying" and before the closing quotation mark. Rule #4:
Semicolons and colons are always placed outside the closing quotation marks.
Example:
Katniss says to Peeta, “Thank you for giving me that bread”; therefore, Peeta becomes overwhelmed with Katniss’ appreciation of his baking skills.
Explanation:
The semicolon is placed outside of the closing quotes, and both parts of the sentence relate to each other.
Incorrect example:
Thresh tells Katniss, “This is for Rue;” however, Thresh knows Katniss is still his enemy.
Explanation:
The semicolon is placed inside of the quotation, when it should be placed outside because it is not part of the direct quote. Rule:
When a quoted passage consists of more than one paragraph, place quotation marks at the beginning of each paragraph and at the end of the entire passage, not at the end of each paragraph.
Example:
"The only moment of any substance I had was when I talked about Prim. Compare that with Thresh, his silent, deadly power, and I'm forgettable. Silly and sparkly and forgettable. No, not entirely forgettable, I had my eleven in training.
"But now Peeta has made me an object of love. Not just his. To hear him tell it I have many admirers. And if the audience really thinks we're in love... I remember how strongly they responded to his confession. Star-crossed lovers."
Explanation:
The passage is all said by Katniss, so the closing quotes should come in after the ending of the whole passage.
Incorrect Example:
"Prim might begin to repeat my words and then where would we be?"
"In the woods waits the only person with whom I can be myself. Gale."
Explanation:
The closing quotes are incorrectly placed after the first paragraph even though the entire passage is spoken by a single person. Rule:
Use single quotation marks to enclose a quotation within a quotation.
Example:
I was told, "Read the part of the book where Gale calls Katniss 'Catnip'."
Explanation:
Since "Catnip" is the exact word used in the novel, this dialogue must use the single quotations around "Catnip" since it is inside of another quotation.
Incorrect Example:
Someone told me, "The part where Katniss 'makes out' with Peeta is very special."
Explanation:
The phrase "makes out" is never used in the novel, so there would be no need to put single quotations around the phrase. Rule:
Use quotation marks to enclose titles of chapters, articles, short stories, poems, songs, and other parts of books and periodicals.
Example:
Read "Part II: The Games"
Explanation:
"Part II: The Games" is a section from the book, so it is proper to enclose the phrase in quotations.
Incorrect Example:
Read "The Hunger Games"
Explanation:
The Hunger Games is not a portion of a book, but it is the book itself so it should be underlined, not enclosed in quotation marks. Rule:
Use quotation marks to enclose slang words, technical terms, and other expressions that are unusual in standard English.
Example:
The "tracker jackers" attack the players and cause powerful hallucinations.
Explanation:
"Tracker jackers" are unique to the novel and do not exist in the real world, so the expression is unusual in standard English.
Incorrect example:
The strange looking "bees" in the arena are very dangerous to the players.
Explanation:
"Bees" is a common word in the English language and the usage is wrong, although the word's implied meaning is "tracker jackers." Works Cited
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