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Analyzing Poetry

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by

melissa walker

on 7 October 2013

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Transcript of Analyzing Poetry

It's just like singing lyrics to a song!
How to Read Poetry
First Read (yes you have to read the poem more than once)
Close Reading
Second Reading
Third Reading
Fourth Reading
Poetry

Strategy: Close Reading

Read for feeling.
What are the mood and tone of the poem?
How does this poem make you feel?
What is the theme

Fourth Reading

Study the structure and language of the poem.
Does it have a rhyme scheme? How many stanzas are in it?
What type of language is used? alliterations, similes, metaphors, personification or idioms.
Clarify words and phrases. Use dictionary, context clues, teacher or peer.

Third Reading

Read for meaning.
Look for clues that help you understand what the poem is saying.
Try to visualize the images.

Second Reading

Read for enjoyment.
Get a feeling for the poem’s words.
A poem is like a song. The sound of the words can be as important as the meaning.
Listen for the rhythm of the poem.

First Reading

The best strategy to use with a poem is close reading.
Close reading means reading word for word, line for line.
Read the poem a number of times (usually 3 or 4 times depending on the length and complexity of the poem).

Close Reading

The best strategy to use with a poem is close reading.
Close reading means reading word for word, line for line.
Read the poem a number of times (usually 3 or 4 times depending
on the length and complexity of the poem).

Read for meaning.
Look for clues that help you understand
what the poem is saying.
Try to visualize the images.

Study the structure and language.
Does it have a rhyme scheme?
How many stanzas are in it?
What type of language is used?
alliterations, similes, metaphors,
personification or idioms.
Clarify words and phrases. Use dictionary,
context clues, teacher or peer.

Read for feeling.
What are the mood and tone of the poem?
How does this poem make you feel?
What is the theme?

Read for enjoyment.
Get a feeling for the poem’s words.
A poem is like a song. The sound of
the words can be as important as the meaning.
Listen for the rhythm of the poem.

Imagery is the picture a reader sees in his or her mind when reading descriptive poetry. An example is this exerpt from "Zebra", "One minute the side street on which the school stood was strangely empty, without people or traffic, without even any of the dogs that often roamed the about neighborhood, vacant and slient, as if it were already in the full heat of summer."
How many times have you had to sing a song over and over and really listen to the words to "get it"?
Full transcript