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Intro to Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet, Professor Elliot Engel
by

Elanna Killackey

on 27 March 2017

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Transcript of Intro to Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
1564-1616
William Shakespeare
Considered the greatest writer in English
Considered greatest writer on Earth
Born in England
Son of a glove maker
Classic education
Moved to London
Became an actor
Started writing
Purchased Globe Theater
How is a "good" writer decided?
YOU...YOU DECIDE
Shakespeare never wanted his plays to be read. He wanted audience to see and feel the words come to life.
This concept is what made Shakespeare so famous, even today.
GLOBE THEATER
1590's plays cost 4 cents
Ushers
Box Office
Movie theater refreshments
Oranges
Meat Pies
Tomatoes
West Pennsylvania, 100 years later
Why tomatoes?
Shakespeare never had to give a single refund!
Audience
Queen Elizabeth I
King James I
Shakespeare wrote for the uneducated.
40% (1 in 2)
GROUNDLINGS
GROUNDLINGS drool
BREAK A LEG!
Shakespeare wrote plays for the "dumb droolers" up front.
Macbeth - witches
Julius Caesar - conspirator can't wait to stab Caesar
PIG BLADDER
STAGE
DIRECTION
Groundlings established
Romeo and Juliet BEST PLAY
William Shakespeare
SIX NEED TO KNOW FACTS
Shakespeare Christening, April 26, 1564
Marriage License to Anne Hathwey, November 28, 1582
First child Christening, May 26, 1583
Twins Christening, February 2, 1585
Name appears in print, 1592 (Robert Green)
Death Certificate, April 23, 1616
3 periods of English Language
1. Old English
2. Middle English
3. Modern English
William Shakespeare
Wrote 38 plays
Wrote 154 sonnets
Wrote 17,677 words, of which, he invented over 1700
Coined several hundred phrases


His plays include 13 suicides

Act I, Scene 1
Handsome teenage boy - Romeo
Beautiful young girl - Juliet

Hormones??

People paid attention for physical attraction alone.
Shakespeare gives you THREE things:
Super natural creatures
Violence
Teenage SEX
Without these things, people would not pay attention. Sound familiar?
King Lear
3 beautiful daughters...
2 rotten
1 good

Who is good?
An 8 year old child could tell you!
If a 5th grader can do it, why can't high school students?
Language?



Shakespeare wrote comedies, tragedies, histories, long poems, short poems, and sonnets.

Freshmen: Romeo Juliet
Sophomores: Midsummer's Night Dream
Seniors: Macbeth/Hamlet

Comp I: Othello
Comp II: King Lear
DEFINE TRAGEDY?
You know it's tragedy if a high level society person falls in the end.
Humpty Dumpty

What is the first line?
Boy?
Couple?
Humpty Dumpty?
If you've ever been footloose and fancy free, if you've ever thanked somebody from the bottom of your heart, if you've ever been left high and dry, if you ever took a test you thought was a piece of cake, if you've ever refused to budge an inch, if you've ever been tongue tied, a tower of strength, hood-winked, or in a pickle...if you've ever knitted your brow, made a virtue of necessity, insisted on fair play, slept not one wink, stood on ceremony, laughed yourself into stitches, had cold comfort or too much of a good thing...if you've ever cleared out bag and baggage cause you thought it was high time and that is the long and short of it...if you've ever believed the game was up even if it involves your own flesh and blood, if you ever lie low til the crack of dawn through thick and thin, because you suspect foul play, if you now bid me good-riddens and and send me packing, if you wish I was as dead as a doornail, if you think I am an eye-sore, a laughing stalk, a stone-hearted villain, bloody-minded, or a blithering idiot, well then...by jove, oh lord, tut tut, for goodness sake (and my personal favorite), what the dickens, it is all one to me even if it is Greek to you, for you are quoting Shakespeare.
Most information provided by:
Professor Elliot Engel
How William Became Shakespeare

Shakespeare Language
Only writer to invent phrases that people would take home and re-use.

To this day we quote Shakespeare without giving him credit.
Pick up the CLASS COPY of Shakespeare's World and the notes for Shakespeare World.
COMPLETE the notes from Shakespeare's World, page 926 and literary terms on page 930.
We will start class on the hour! Be prepared to take LOTS OF NOTES!!!
There will be a QUIZ on Friday over terms and notes.
http://www.biography.com/people/william-shakespeare-9480323

Archetype
- original pattern or model from which all things of the same kind are copied or on which they are based

Blank verse
- unrhymed poetry written in iambic pentameter

Couplet
- rhymed pair of lines (rhythmic pattern)
Ex. “From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.”

Internal rhyme
- rhyming within a line.
Ex. "Once upon a midnight
dreary
, while I pondered, weak and
weary"

Inversion
- words out of order
Ex. “Powerful you have become, the dark side I sense in you.”

Tragedy
- when someone from high level of society falls to their destruction/death

Tragic Hero
- the one who falls

Tragic Flaw
- a flaw that causes our tragic hero to fall

Tragedy
- Harry Potter (not really a tragedy, because it has a happy ending)

Tragic Hero
- Severus Snape

Tragic Flaw
- loyalty to Dumbledore and love for Lily causes his death by the antagonist (Voldermort)

Foil
- character whose actions and attitude contrast sharply with another character (Harry Potter vs. Draco Malfoy)

Monologue
- speech given to other actors by ONE actor (mono)

Soliloquy
- speech given by one person alone (solo) expressing thoughts or feelings

Aside
- actor talks directly to audience or another character --- meaning for the audience to hear but not the other characters on stage

Drama
-plots and characters are developed through dialogue and action

Epilogue
- short addition at the end of a literary work about the characters

ACT
- division of an entire play

SCENE
- division of an ACT

PROLOGUE
- sets the stage - often reveals the play

Tragedy
- Beauty and the Beast (not really a tragedy, because it has a happy ending)

Tragic Hero
- Gaston (Protagonist)

Tragic Flaw
- Belle (loyalty to father and odd ball), Gaston (arrogant)

Foil
- Beast is the foil to Gaston

Comic Relief
- Comic relief consists of humorous scenes, incidents, or speeches that are included in a serious drama to provide a reduction in emotional intensity.

LaFou is the
COMIC RELIEF
to Gaston.

Rhythm
- a strong, regular pattern of movement or sound

Meter
- a stressed and unstressed syllabic pattern in verse

Iambic
- metrical feet with two syllables (unstressed followed by stressed)

Pentameter
- a line has five of three feet

EV
ery
/
TIME
we
/

TALK
, we
/

STRING
to
/

GET
her /
ACC
ented and
UNACC
ented
SYLL
ables with
OUT
even
THINK
ing a
BOUT
it.


I
never said I killed the King.
I
never
said I killed the King.
I never
said
I killed the King.
I never said
I
killed the King.
I never said I
killed
the King.
I never said I killed
the
King.
I never said I killed the
King
.


Iambic Pentameter


Shall I
/
compare
/
thee to
/
a sum
/
mers day.


Sonnet
- lyric poem of 14 lines written in iambic pentameter
Full transcript