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EDUC 505 Engaging Students with Text

EDUC 505 Section 2015-0112 with Dr. Rebecca Williams
by

Erin Cooper

on 2 March 2015

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Transcript of EDUC 505 Engaging Students with Text

EDUC 505 - Engaging Students with Text
Supplemental Text #3
My third supplemental text I have chosen to use is George Orwell's 1984.
Core Text
Supplemental Text #1
Supplemental Text #2
By Erin Cooper, USC ID #5624958459
References
10.7 Students analyze the rise of totalitarian governments after World War I.
1. Understand the causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution, including
Lenin’s use of totalitarian means to seize and maintain control (e.g., the Gulag).
2. Trace Stalin’s rise to power in the Soviet Union and the connection between economic
policies, political policies, the absence of a free press, and systematic violations of
human rights (e.g., the Terror Famine in Ukraine).
3. Analyze the rise, aggression, and human costs of totalitarian regimes (Fascist and
Communist) in Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union, noting especially their common
and dissimilar traits.
CCSS
The core text for my 10th grade World History class is the textbook Modern World History: Patterns of Interaction
The unit focused on is Chapter 14: Revolution and Nationalism, 1900-1939
My supplemental texts will support the unit and lessons covering the Russian Revolution through the rise of Totalitarianism, which aligns with CCSS 10.7 and each of it's sub-points (listed below for reference)
CCSS &
Learning Objective
Text Selection
& Rationale
This medium of a video was chosen to provide students with variety in the types of literary content they experience
It was also chosen because it is one thing for students to hear about the starvation precipitated by Stalin's economic policies, but quite another to see video of those affected by those policies
This video specifically aligns with the CCSS 10.7.2 because it shows the impact of totalitarian rule by Stalin on the Russian population
It also provides an opportunity for students to mediate and synthesize data from this observational literacy platform with data from the core literary resource (i.e. the textbook)
Literacy Strategy
& Rationale
Learning Theories
Constructivism is the main learning theory utilized with my stated LO and this visual literacy resource used for this lesson. Students are expected to construct their knowledge from previous lessons and readings with information learned from the video and synthesize that knowledge enabling them to complete the journal entry writing assignment.
Social Cognitive Theory could also play a role within this lesson, since people can learn by observing others and students are observing video clips from the past. It also feeds student motivation since Social Cognitive Theory states that behavior is directed towards particular goals and I'm supplying them with the goal of completing the writing assignment and therefore getting a good grade.
Assessment & Checks for Understanding
Students will complete their concept maps independently
I will rotate throughout the room and ask questions and clarify concepts for those students who have questions
The concept maps themselves are a check for understanding about the unit, so that any necessary re-teaching can occur before the next lesson and the culminating journal assignment
CCSS &
Learning Objective
CCSS: 10.7
Students analyze the rise of totalitarian governments after World War I.
3. Analyze the rise, aggression, and human costs of totalitarian regimes (Fascist and Communist) in Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union, noting especially their common and dissimilar traits.

LO:
By the completion of the unit on Totalitarianism and completing the novel 1984 SWABT to compare (analysis) aspects of private life and public life of citizens under totalitarian rule in either the Soviet Union or Italy with those living under democratic rule in the United States. Students will then synthesize (synthesis) a journal entry from the perspective of a Soviet or Italian citizen living under Stalin’s or Mussolini's totalitarian regimes respectively. Students will be assessed upon their completed journal entry and including elements of what they learned about totalitarianism.
Text Selection & Rationale
Literacy Strategy
& Rationale
Learning Theories
Assessment &
Checks for Understanding
Prior to the completion of the journal entry, I will perform a check for understanding (formative assessment) by asking students to name elements of a totalitarian society based on their observations in the video and previous lessons. I'll use the whip-around technique so that all students respond before beginning their journal assignment
Students' summative assessment will be their completed journal assignment from the perspective of a Soviet or Italian citizen living under Stalin’s or Mussolini's totalitarian regimes respectively.
Students will be assessed upon their completed journal entry and including elements of what they learned about totalitarianism. I will provide students with the grading criteria (e.g. voice, spelling, grammar, incorporated facts from the video and lesson, citation of sources, etc.)
Gee, J. (2012). Discourses and literacies. Social linguistics and literacies: Ideology in discourses (4th ed.) (pp. 147-178). New York, NY: Routledge.
Marx, Karl and Friedrich Engels (1847). Manifesto of the Communist Party. Retrieved from htps://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/index.htm
Ormrod, J. E. (2003). Educational psychology: Developing learners. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Merrill/Prentice Hall.
Stalin in Colour (2013). General format. Retrieved from https:/www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcCJ2kcLpSk
CCSS &
Learning Objective
CCSS:
10.7 Students analyze the rise of totalitarian governments after World War I.
1. Understand the causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution, including Lenin’s use of totalitarian means to seize and maintain control (e.g., the Gulag).

LO:
By the completion of the lesson SWBAT to utilize the textbook and supporting text (The Communist Manifesto) to evaluate and explain (Bloom's evaluation) in a 3-5 paragraph essay describing (evaluating) why the Russian people would have been attracted to Communism as political replacement to the hereditary monarchy and why they remained susceptible to totalitarian rule.
Text Selection & Rationale
I selected The Communist Manifesto as a supplemental text to provide students with a better understanding of Communism and it's implementation in post-revolutionary Russia
This text specifically aligns with the CCSS 10.7.1 because it provides perspective to students and allows them to analyze Communism and evaluate (Bloom's evaluation) why Communism would have been so attractive to Russian citizens after the Russian Revolution.
It also addresses the social studies universal theme of Power
Literacy Strategy
& Rationale
The literacy strategy I've chosen to support this lesson is Semantic Mapping. Since this strategy teaches/assists students in organizing their thoughts it will assist the lesson on multiple levels.
Students will be able to free associate with the concept of communism as well as hereditary monarchy.
It will also assist me in a check for understanding to see what additional academic vocabulary and concepts need clarification before students begin their writing assignments.
As Gee explains, literacy strategies should be used to further learning, but not be the objective of that learning (p. 161). As such, this strategy will be used to help students organize their thoughts and the main ideas/concepts in the reading in anticipation of completing their essay.
Learning Theories
Cognitive Theory plays a large role in this lesson because students must think strategically about the Social Studies universal theme of Power in the context of political systems. Specifically, students must compare the rule of a hereditary monarchy with totalitarianism applied with a backdrop of communism.
To this end, Constructivism also plays a role as students must mediate their understanding of hereditary monarchies, communism and totalitarianism to construct their knowledge of events and the impact on the psyche of the Russian people in order to completed their essay assignment.
Assessment & Checks for Understanding
Periodic checks for understanding will occur through class discussion and using white boards for students to answer questions during lecture, so that I can ensure the learning taking place within the lesson is on track. These will be formative assessments implemented throughout the lesson.
The summative assessment for the overall lesson is the 3-5 paragraph essay to answer the prompt outlined in the learning objective:
Why would the Russian people would have been attracted to Communism as political replacement to the hereditary monarchy? And why did they remain susceptible to totalitarian rule?
For my second supplemental text, I have selected a Smithsonian Channel video documentary on Stalin's Totalitarian regime.
CCSS:
10.7 Students analyze the rise of totalitarian governments after World War I.
2. Trace Stalin’s rise to power in the Soviet Union and the connection between economic policies, political policies, the absence of a free press, and systematic violations of human rights (e.g., the Terror Famine in Ukraine).
LO:
By the completion of the lesson and viewing of the Stalin in Clolour video SWBAT to catagorize (analysis) the different components of totalitarianism and organize them using the concept map I will provide. This concept map will assist students in completing the synthesis assignment in the next lesson.
I selected the novel 1984 for use because it's an excellent opportunity to explore the multiple facets of Totalitarianism in a society and allows students to experience it via a first person narrative.
The style of writing is also very accessible for high school students while illustrating powerful concepts about personal freedoms and the role of government in the lives of her citizens
1984 provides students with a platform to compare totalitarian rule in a vacuum without the Fascist or Communist element, since the novel doesn't have a dynamic antagonist leader, which should help students better identify the differences between totalitarian rule under Communism or Fascism . Those specific facts will come from the textbook, which illustrates why this makes for a good supplementary text to accompany the textbook
Finally, it also gives an opportunity to align social students CCSS with English/language arts CCSS if planned an executed in conjunction
I believe using the Think Aloud strategy will be an extremely effective literacy strategy for ensuring students access meaning and understanding
Obviously this strategy can't be used for the entire text; however, it can be utilized for key sections.
I specifically want to ensure students go though all the steps (activating prior knowledge, visualizing, predicting, questioning, clarifying, making connections, summarizing, identifying problems and using fix-up strategies). As students go through each step, it will better enable them to imagine themselves living under a totalitarian regime and the impact of what that life will be like, which will better allow them to synthesize the journal entry assignment.
Since utilizing the Think Aloud strategy for the entire novel isn't realistic, I'd like to also have students Think-Pair-Share so that as they complete sections of the novel then they can check their understanding against their fellow students.
Sociocultural Theory is at play in this lesson because students are expected to make analyze this text (a complex task) that's within their ZPD and draw parallels to the real world Ormrod, p. 43). I.e. what they've learned about the Soviet Union and Italy in conjunction with totalitarian societies.
Social Cognitive Theory could also be in play within this lesson if I utilize the "Think-Pair-Share" strategy, since people can learn by observing others and students are observing fellow students make meaning.
The first supplemental text I selected is Karl Marx's and Friedrich Engels' famous pamphlet The Communist Manifesto.
The literacy strategy I've chosen to support my lesson is an anticipation guide
Since students are being asked to identify and organize various components of totalitarian rule in a concept map based off their textbook reading and a video documentary on Stalin, I believe this is the best strategy to frontload the needed instruction and give students an idea as to the scope of the knowledge demands of the assignment concepts they should be connecting to as they view the video.
This strategy will also allow students to acquire the academic knowledge needed to complete their concept map as well as their synthesis assignment in the next lesson
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