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Gender based differences in Australian research

by Jean-Francois Desvignes-Hicks, Clarivate Analytics Australasia. Prepared for the Women in Research Citation Award, Canberra 25th October 2016.
by

Melissa Boatwright

on 27 February 2017

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Transcript of Gender based differences in Australian research

A window on gender based differences in Australian research
The data source
Web of Science core collection
977,509 papers in Australia (2000-2015)
1,359,056 different author IDs (scientists)
The Australian dataset
750,662 papers with an Australian affiliation
546,074 Australian scientists
Top disciplines
How do we compare internationally?
Productivity
23% more men than women
78% more papers with men than women
Women in Research Citation Award, ANU, 2016
Underestimates Chinese and Korean names
Duplicates of IDs: Australian researchers headcount, 100-150k in 2010 (estimates from OECD), 90-100k in this data
ERA 2015 (ARC): 57% / 43% (total headcount 67,579)
136,979 women scientists, 338,745 papers
189,858 men scientists, 585,070 papers
750,662 papers with Australian affiliation
Men:
6.2
papers per scientist
Women:
4.3
papers per scientist
Citations
23% more men than women
120% more citations to men than to women
136,979 women scientists, 7,032,482 cites
189,858 men scientists, 15,500,742 cites
750,662 papers with Australian affiliation
Men:
82
cites per scientist
Women:
51
cites per scientist
356,411 Australian scientists with a given name
219,237 (40%) scientists with no gender information
326,837 (60%) scientists with gender information
189,858 (
58%
) male Australian scientists
136,979 (
42%
) female Australian scientists
A citation's gender, age or discipline gap?
After mormalising for document type, discipline and paper's age:
Evolution of the number of papers
Collaborations
Take home message
Australia is in the league table for gender equity
Science < rest of society (women are
46%
of the Australian workforce,
42%
of scientists)
Productivity gap
Gendered disciplines
No influence gap
No collaboration gap
An award to recognize contribution in research
Citation award
Top early to mid career researchers in Australia
By 10 broad domain of research including S.S.H.
% of papers in top 10% (normalise for discipline, age and type of papers), number of papers, highly cited papers.
trans/multi disciplines.
Includes humanities disciplines.
Large differences between domains for citations and the number of scientists.
Australia:
No OECD/ABS data
Men:
66.1
average citation percentile
Women:
65.0
average citation percentile
a lower percentile value shows a higher citation impact
Top 10 Web of science categories ranked by share of female scientists and with 1,000 or more scientists
Bottom disciplines
Top 10 Web of science categories ranked by share of male scientists and with 1,000 or more scientists
10 Web of science categories where share of female and male scientists is near median value and with 1,000 or more scientists
Median disciplines
Men:
5.0
collaborations per paper
Women:
5.1
collaborations per paper
Men:
6.7
international collaborations per paper
Women:
6.5
international collaborations per paper
More men have more papers
More women have fewer papers
Publication distribution of ECR publishing after 2009
Evolution in the number of papers produced by female and males Australian scientists from 2000 to 2014. The 2008 "bump" is due to a change in the data capture.
Early Career Researchers (scientists who have started to published indexed papers after 2009).
All identified scientists in Australia (ids)
37%
70%
Full transcript