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It Takes A Village: The Collective Impact Model for College Access

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Troy Grant

on 16 November 2014

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Transcript of It Takes A Village: The Collective Impact Model for College Access

MEMPHIS
Latino Student Success
Memphis
Latino Student Success
Collaborative
Goal 1
Proficiency in
All Latino students are academically prepared
Goal 2
All Latino students will complete a high quality degree or credential
All Latino students will enter some form of postsecondary edudcation
Goal 3
Proficiency in
Postsecondary Readiness
4th Grade Reading
8th Grade Math
ACT
High School Graduation
Postsecondary Going
College Retention
College Completion
Grades K - 5
Grades 6 - 8
Grades 9 - 12
Postsecondary Education
Work
The Latino Student Pipeline
The Future
Forces Influencing Latino Student Success
Collective Impact
The Plan
Preparation
Access
Completion
We envision:
A community full of resources for Latino students and their families

Leadership emeging within the Latino community to champion Latino student success issues and serve as role models for success

A community where all Latino students are academically prepared

A place where all Latino students enroll in some form of postsecondary education

A city where all Latino students complete a high quality postsecondary credential

A community where all Latinos transition from postsecondary education into high quality, life-sustaining employment

Development of a Latino culture where going to college is not only valued but expected

A Memphis and Shelby County where more than 60% of the Latino population hold a high quality crediential
There is a lack of knowledge among the Latino community regarding the education system: postsecondary options and requirements, information regarding financial aid, how the system functions, etc.

Many Latino students are not academically prepared for higher education.

There are a limited number of Memphis-area Latino leaders in government, K-12 education, higher education, community, etc.

There are a limited number of successful role models within the Latino community.

The political and social culture requires the collaborative to be very careful and clear when discussing Latino student success issues and messages.

Financial aid and admissions policies regarding students without papers make higher education difficult to access for students.

State policies of neighbor states and possible changes in Tennessee law may impede increases in Latino student success.

There are limited pathways to employment for some Latinos after competition of education.

Changes in the economy may negatively affect Latino student success efforts.
Latino families are committed to their community.

Tennessee is developing a culture focused on education reform which targets student success both in K-12 and higher education.

Core team members have access to and trust within the Latino community.

Both Memphis and Shelby County mayors understand the link between economic development and educational attainment.

Both mayors are willing to take action to improve rates of educational attainment.

Memphis has a community of organizations that are willing and ready to serve the Latino population. There is great potential for growth in partners and resources.

Many Memphis and Shelby County residents have financial aid opportunities available to them: Hope Lottery Scholarship, Memphis/Shelby Achieves, Pell, etc.

The current economic climate creates a sense of urgency around the need for education.
8th Grade Math
Shelby
Memphis
Proficient/Adv.
17%
32%
ACT Scores
21.09
Memphis
Composite
18.06
Shelby
High School Graduation
82%
Memphis
64%
Shelby
4-Year Cohort
Postsecondary Going Rate
46%
Memphis
30%
Shelby
Retention Rates
82%
University of Memphis
78%
Southwest Tennessee Community College
82%
Tennessee Technology Center at Memphis
Graduation Rates
13%
38%
Southwest Tennessee Community College
75%
Tennessee Technology Center at Memphis
University of Memphis
150% of Time
4th Grade Reading
Proficient/Adv.
44%
Shelby
21%
Memphis
Forces Working Against Latino Student Success
Forces We Must Neutralize
Forces Working Toward Latino Student Success
Forces We Must Strengthen
City of Memphis
Mayor A C Wharton, Jr.
ESL Program
Core Team
Mission
The mission of the Memphis Latino Student Success Collaborative is to increase college completion among Latino students in the City of Memphis and Shelby County through the development of sustainable collaborative partnerships and programs focused on systemically improving Latino student success. To accomplish this objective, we will create a data driven, investment-worthy Integrated Action Plan built upon the principles of shared leadership, adaptive resilience, and national best practices. We will serve as advocates for culturally relevant programs, structures and policies to encourage Latino student college completion.
Stakeholders
The more educated a city’s population, the more robust its economy will be. The future viability of the City of Memphis and Shelby County relies heavily on the educational attainment of all its residents. As with all segments of the population, educational attainment among the Memphis/Shelby Latino population is vital to the community’s economic success. The Latino population is the fastest growing segment of the Memphis and Shelby County population. The Memphis Latino Student Success Collaborative seeks serves the entire City of Memphis and Shelby County community and particularly all Memphis-area Latinos by working to increase college attainment in the Latino community.
We do not come to this work with a particular group’s authority but as individuals and organizations with a vested interest and commitment to increasing the number of Latino Memphis and Shelby County residents who complete higher education. Adaptive challenges cannot be managed from the top down, but instead, must be confronted with, and dealt with honestly and by those who care most. Increasing college attainment in the Latino population is a moral imperative. We are individuals and organizations who heard the call and responded.
Authority
The Memphis Latino Student Success Collaborative is designing a multi-partner college access and completion program coupled with the beginnings of a community-wide collaborative focused on Latino student success.
Community Metrics of Success
Our Charter
45.1%
Increase in the City of Memphis and Shelby County Latino Population from 2000 - 2006
52,092
Latinos in the City of Memphis and Shelby County in 2010
Setting the Stage
4th
fastest growing Latino population in the United States
Tennessee has the
19%
Latinos, 25 years of age and older, in the City of Memphis and Shelby County have an associates degree or higher

In fall 2011, the Lumina Foundation for Education awarded the Tennessee Higher Education Commission a Latino Student Success Grant in the amount of $600,000 focused on increasing the number of Latinos in Memphis completing a high quality postsecondary credential. Through a six month planning process, the Memphis Latino student success collaborative has designed a multi-partner college access and completion program coupled with the beginnings of a community-wide collaborative focused on Latino student success. Best practices and lessons learned from the implementation of a federally-funded College Mentor Corp model currently in place across Tennessee will serve as the foundation of the Memphis Latino student success college access and completion program. The community-wide collaborative will focus community attention and work around three areas: academic preparation, college access and college completion.

The Memphis Latino Student Success Grant will leverage the strength of collaborative partners to support program implementation and ensure long-term sustainability.
31.9%
Working-age Tennesseans with at least an associate degree
Increasing College Attainment is a National and Statewide Priority
President Obama called for the United States to be first in the world again in college attainment by 2020
Lumina Foundation set a national goal of 60 percent of Americans to have a high-quality degree or credential by 2025
MEMPHIS
Latino Student Success
Memphis
Latino Student Success
Collaborative
Goal 1
Proficiency in
All Latino students are academically prepared
Goal 2
All Latino students will complete a high quality degree or credential
All Latino students will enter some form of postsecondary education
Goal 3
Proficiency in
Postsecondary Readiness
4th Grade Reading
8th Grade Math
ACT
High School Graduation
Post-secondary Going
College Retention
College Completion
Grades K - 5
Grades 6 - 8
Grades 9 - 12
Postsecondary Education
Work
The Latino Student Pipeline
The Future
Forces Influencing Latino Student Success
Collective Impact
Program Implementation - A Model for Collective Impact
Preparation
Access
We envision:
A community full of resources for Latino students and their families

Leadership emeging within the Latino community to champion Latino student success issues and serve as role models for success

A community where all Latino students are academically prepared

A place where all Latino students enroll in some form of postsecondary education

A city where all Latino students complete a high quality postsecondary credential

A community where all Latinos transition from postsecondary education into high quality, life-sustaining employment

Development of a Latino culture where going to college is not only valued but expected

A Memphis and Shelby County where more than 60% of the Latino population hold a high quality crediential
There is a lack of knowledge among the Latino community regarding the education system: postsecondary options and requirements, information regarding financial aid, how the system functions, etc.

Many Latino students are not academically prepared for higher education.

There are a limited number of Memphis-area Latino leaders in government, K-12 education, higher education, community, etc.

There are a limited number of successful role models within the Latino community.

The political and social culture requires the collaborative to be very careful and clear when discussing Latino student success issues and messages.

Financial aid and admissions policies regarding students without papers make higher education difficult to access for students.

State policies of neighbor states and possible changes in Tennessee law may impede increases in Latino student success.

There are limited pathways to employment for some Latinos after competition of education.

Changes in the economy may negatively affect Latino student success efforts.
Latino families are committed to their community.

Tennessee is developing a culture focused on education reform which targets student success both in K-12 and higher education.

Core team members have access to and trust within the Latino community.

Both Memphis and Shelby County mayors understand the link between economic development and educational attainment.

Both mayors are willing to take action to improve rates of educational attainment.

Memphis has a community of organizations that are willing and ready to serve the Latino population. There is great potential for growth in partners and resources.

Many Memphis and Shelby County residents have financial aid opportunities available to them: Hope Lottery Scholarship, Memphis/Shelby Achieves, Pell, etc.

The current economic climate creates a sense of urgency around the need for education.
8th Grade Math
Shelby
Memphis
Proficient/Adv.
17%
32%
ACT Scores
21.09
Memphis
Composite
18.06
Shelby
High School Graduation
82%
Memphis
64%
Shelby
4-Year Cohort
Postsecondary Going Rate
46%
Memphis
30%
Shelby
Retention Rates
82%
UM
78%
STCC
82%
TTC at Memphis
Graduation Rates
13%
38%
STCC
75%
TTC at Memphis
UM
150% of Time
4th Grade Reading
Proficient/Adv.
44%
Shelby
21%
Memphis
Forces Working Against Latino Student Success
Forces We Must Neutralize
Forces Working Toward Latino Student Success
Forces We Must Strengthen
City of Memphis
Mayor A C Wharton, Jr.
ESL Program
Core Team
The Memphis Latino Student Success Collaborative is designing a multi-partner college access and completion program coupled with the beginnings of a community-wide collaborative focused on Latino student success.
Community Metrics of Success
123%
Increase in the City of Memphis and Shelby County Latino Population from 2000 - 2010
52,092
Latinos in the City of Memphis and Shelby County in 2010
Setting the Stage
4th
fastest growing Latino population in the United States
Tennessee has the
19%
Latinos, 25 years of age and older, in the City of Memphis and Shelby County have an associates degree or higher

In fall 2011, the Lumina Foundation for Education awarded the Tennessee Higher Education Commission a Latino Student Success Grant in the amount of $600,000 focused on increasing the number of Latinos in Memphis completing a high quality postsecondary credential. Through a six month planning process, the Memphis Latino student success collaborative has designed a multi-partner college access and completion program coupled with the beginnings of a community-wide collaborative focused on Latino student success. Best practices and lessons learned from the implementation of a federally-funded College Mentor Corp model currently in place across Tennessee will serve as the foundation of the Memphis Latino student success college access and completion program. The community-wide collaborative will focus community attention and work around three areas: academic preparation, college access and college completion.

The Memphis Latino Student Success Grant will leverage the strength of collaborative partners to support program implementation and ensure long-term sustainability.
For additional information contact:

Troy Grant
Director of College Access Initiatives
Tennessee Higher Education Commission
troy.grant@tn.gov
615-532-0423
The 2010-2015 Public Agenda for Tennessee Higher Education establishes the goal of Tennessee reaching the projected national average of undergraduate degree attainment by 2025
Latino Memphis
YMCA
Multicultural Achievers
Graduate Memphis
Southwest Tennessee Community College
College Access Town Hall
College Resource Center for Adults Led by Memphis Talent Dividend
Led by the Community Foundation and HSF
Kingsbury High School
tnAchieves
Last Dollar Scholarship and Professional Mentors
Business Community
Greater Memphis Chamber
FedEx
Internships
Student Presentations
Job Shadowing
Intensive Case Management and Mentoring
Postsecondary Education
TTC Memphis
4-Year Institutions
Other Institutions
Outreach
Access and Diversity Prog
Dual Enrollment
Memphis City Schools ESL Prog
Conduit to Schools
Language Support
Expertise
Leadership Development
Tutoring
Family Outreach
Mayor
A C Wharton, Jr.
Public Attention
Policy Support
Identification of Additional Resources
THEC
Strategic Partner Leverage
Data Support
Technical Assistance
Grant Management
Latino Community Media
Public Attention
Community Outreach
Year One
Planned Expansion to Additional Schools
Completion
Completion
13%
75%
Isolated Impact
Collective Impact
• Funders select individual grantees that offer the most promising solutions
• Grantees work separately and compete to produce the greatest independent impact
• Evaluation attempts to isolate a particular grantee’s impact
• Large scale change depends on scaling a single organization
• Corporate and government sectors are disconnected
• Social problems arise from the interaction of many organizations within a larger system
• Progress depends on working toward the same goal and measuring the same things
• Large scale impact depends on increasing cross-sector alignment and learning among many organizations
• Government and corporate sectors are essential partners
In the Balance
There is a mismatch between the complexity of social problems and funders' typical focus on individual grantees
"Collective impact initiatives provide a structure for cross-sector leaders to forge a common agenda for solving a specific social problem"
Collective
Impact
Backbone
Organizations
Shared
Measurement
System
Common
Agenda
Continuous
Communication
Mutually
Reinforcing
Activities
The Challenge
Background
It Takes a Village: The Collective Impact Model for College Access
These are huge goals. How do we tackle them?
"Funders search for more effective interventions
as if there were a cure for failing schools that only needs to be discovered, in the way that
medical cures are discovered in laboratories."
"As a result of this process, nearly 1.4 million nonprofits try to invent independent solutions to major social problems, often working at odds
with each other and exponentially increasing the perceived resources required to make
meaningful progress."
This approach focuses on "finding and funding a solution embodied within a single organization, combined with the hope that the most effective organizations will grow or replicate to extend their impact more widely."
The Cycle of Isolated Impact
Is it enough?
"Despite the dominance of this approach, there is scant evidence that isolated initiatives are the best way to solve many social problems in today’s complex and interdependent world. No single organization is responsible for any major social problem, nor can any single organization cure it. In the field of education, even the most highly respected nonprofits—such as the Harlem Children’s Zone, Teach for America, and the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP)—have taken decades to reach tens of thousands of children, a remarkable achievement that deserves praise, but one that is three orders of magnitude short of the tens of millions of U.S. children that need help."
Collective Impact
Collective Impact Defined
A group of important actors from different, diverse sectors coming together with a common agenda to solve a specific social problem
GEAR UP TN Mission
GEAR UP TN aims to expand the college-going culture in Tennessee. By using an empowerment model that recognizes the assets and needs of local communities, GEAR UP TN looks to shift the state’s educational culture. We aim to develop long-term, successful partnerships to support students in reaching college and providing them with the resources to succeed in college.
GEAR UP TN Goals
Increase the academic performance and preparation for postsecondary education for GEAR UP students.

Increase the rates of high school graduation and enrollment in postsecondary education for GEAR UP students.

Increase GEAR UP students’ and their families’ knowledge of postsecondary education options, preparation, and financing.
How GEAR UP TN Works
GEAR UP TN is implemented through subgrants to GEAR UP TN Collaboratives.

Each Collaborative includes at least one priority high school, one middle school, one higher education institution, the local board of education, and two community-based partners.

Each Collaborative will create a College Access Steering Committee consisting of representatives from each Collaborative partner organization focused on developing project sustainability, resource development, building new partnerships and creating a college-going culture in direct-service schools.
"Collaboration is nothing new. The social sector is filled with examples of partnerships, networks, and other types of joint efforts. But collective impact initiatives are distinctly different. Unlike most collaborations, collective impact initiatives involve a centralized infrastructure, a dedicated staff, and a structured process that leads to a common agenda, shared measurement, continuous communication, and mutually reinforcing activities among all participants."
Tennessee Collective Impact Application
Full transcript