Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Grammar Basics 1

Introduction to Nouns, Pronouns, & Verbs; Diagramming with the Simple Subject & Simple Predicate
by

Micki Clark

on 29 July 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Grammar Basics 1

Grammar Basics 1: Pre-AP English 2 A
A Prezi created by Mrs. Micki Clark - www.micki-clark.com
nouns
pronouns
verbs
Sentence diagrams!
Nouns
There are six types of noun:
common
proper
concrete
abstract
collective
possessive
Common nouns name general people, places, things, or ideas:
girl, school, car, honesty

Proper nouns name specific people, places, or things:
Amanda, Madisonville-North Hopkins High School, Camry

Please take notice: common nouns are not capitalized (unless, of course, they are the first word of the sentence). Proper nouns are capitalized no matter what!
You can perceive a concrete noun with one (or more) of your five senses (touch, taste, smell, hearing, sight). An abstract noun can't be perceived in this way.

Here's a hint: people, places, and things are going to be CONCRETE. You can see your desk. You can hear it creaking under you. You can touch its surface. If you lean down, you can smell it. I don't advise tasting it, but I guess you could.

Ideas will be ABSTRACT. Think about it. Can you see pride? Smell it?
Possessive Nouns
Nouns that show ownership are called POSSESSIVE nouns. We generally show ownership using an apostrophe, like so:
Singular nouns (like "cat") get an 's: cat's
Plural nouns that end in s just get an apostrophe: cats'
And plural nouns that don't end in s get an 's: children's

By the way, this is a rule using AP style (like newspapers use). When you attend college, your professors might use a different style, and therefore a different rule. AP style is most common, though.
Collective Nouns
Collective nouns are hard (sorry!) The problem here is that we are so used to saying the wrong thing, the correct answer sounds strange to us.

If the noun refers to the group acting as a unit, it's singular: Our team usually wins. (The team doesn't all win separately--it's an action done together).
If the noun refers to the group acting individually, it's plural: The team are all expected to earn good grades. (The team members must all do this in different classes).
Verbs
Pronouns
A pronoun is a word that replaces a noun.
One very important word you need to learn: the ANTECEDENT. The antecedent is the word that the pronoun replaced in the original phrase or sentence.
The
boy
drove
his
car to the store.
pronoun
antecedent
Any
questions?

Action Verbs
Most of your teachers have probably taught you that verbs are "doing" words, and that's a fair guess...if you're talking about action verbs.

Indeed, the majority of verbs are used to show action (run, walk, dance).

So...what kind of verbs DON'T show action? What do they "do"?
Linking Verbs
Linking verbs join, or "link", the subject to words in the predicate. I like to think of linking verbs as equals signs, because most linking verbs join a subject and its predicate NOMINATIVE (a noun that renames the subject) or predicate ADJECTIVE (an adjective that further describes the subject).

Mr. Huddleston
is
the principal.

Chocolate
is
delicious.
predicate nominative
predicate
adjective
Helping verbs "help" the verb by clarifying its meaning.
Typically, helping verbs are used to show tense:

I
will

go
to the store.
I
have

been
to the store.

Here's a chart of helping verbs:
http://www.kyrene.org/schools/brisas/sunda/verb/1help.htm
And by the way...
gerunds are verbs masquerading as nouns. We'll talk about them in detail on another day.
Sentence
Diagrams

Remember: the
simple subject
of a sentence is the noun or the pronoun the sentence is about.

The
simple predicate
is the
verb
or
verb phrase
. Here are some examples:

My
cat

likes
milk. (action verb)
She

is
spoiled!! (linking verb)
She
will drink
it all. (helping verb)
There are several steps to sentence diagramming, but we are going to start small and simple, just focusing on diagrams with simple SUBJECTS and simple PREDICATES. Start by drawing a baseline and a center line, just like this:
The first step when diagramming is to identify the simple subject and simple predicate.
The
teacher

gave
the student a textbook.
The second step is to draw the basic diagram and place your subjects and predicates. REMEMBER: you only capitalize a word if it's capitalized in the original sentence!
teacher
gave
What if the subject of the sentence isn't obvious?
Shut
the door.

The subject isn't directly stated--it's
IMPLIED
.
Shut
(you)
What if there's more than one subject? More than one predicate? More than one of EACH? Yikes!
John
and
Sarah

ran.
John
Sarah
and
ran
I call this diagram a pencil-tip.
John ran and jumped.
John
and
jumped
ran
John and Sarah ran and jumped.
We're going to learn more sentence diagramming.

If you'd like to get a head start on some practice, you can find the posters on the class blog:

http://www.micki-clark.com/blog

Just click on "posters."
John
Sarah
ran
jumped
and
and
Full transcript