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Verbs of the senses

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by

Andy Ortega

on 14 March 2017

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Transcript of Verbs of the senses

Verbs of the senses
hear, smell, feel, taste, see
The senses
Verbs of senses are stative verbs and aren't normally used with continuous tenses
Like + noun
It seems like a good idea!
hear / see + infinitive
We often use
hear/see + object + verb in infinitive
=
whole action
hear/see + object + gerund
We can also use gerunds after
HEAR/SEE
,
but the meaning is slightly
different
The five senses + adjective/noun
Seem/look
Seem
= impressions of behavior, voice, actions
Sarah
seems
happy

I smell something weird...
I am smelling something weird...
But we can use
CAN
with these verbs to refer to stg happening at the moment
I can smell gas
I'm smelling gas
HEAR
and
SEE
can also be
action verbs (used with
continuous tenses
), but they have a different meaning
I've been
hearing
good news about you recently
(been
receiving
information)
I'm
seeing
Camila tonight
(have
arranged
to meet her)
I heard the girl
play
the piano
(whole action)
I saw the man
hit
his dog
(whole action)
I saw the girl
playing
the piano
(action in progress or repetitive)
I saw the man
hitting
the dog
(in progress or repetitive)
When we talk about the impression stg/sb gives us through senses, we use
LOOK, FEEL, SMELL, SOUND, TASTE
After these verbs, we can use:
1. An
adjective
:
These shoes feel
comfortable
Anna looks
England
That smells
delicious
That song sounds
awful
This soup tastes
a bit salty
2. like + noun
You look
like
your mother
It sounds
like
a thunder
This tastes
like
tea, not coffee
3. as if/as though
+ a clause
She looks
as if/as though
she had been crying...
4. smell/taste +
of

It smells
of
garlic
It tastes
of
vanilla
(it has the taste/smell of garlic/vanilla
It tastes
like
vanilla
(similar taste)
It smells
like
garlic
5. smell/taste +
like
Look = impression from sb's
face
You
look

worried
After seem, you can use
1. An
Adjective
You seem
worried
, are you ok?
2. An infinitive (simple/perfect)
You seem to be a bit down today...
You seem to have made a mistake here....
as if/as though +
a verb phrase
It seems
as if/as though
every time I clean the car it rains!
Full transcript