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In Flanders Fields

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by

Grace Silverstein

on 11 February 2014

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Transcript of In Flanders Fields

In Flanders Fields
by John McCrae
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
By Lior Sharon, Raph Koslover and Grace Silverstein
9AB/1b

Rhyme scheme and Rhythm of the poem
In the first paragraph McCrae uses the rhyme scheme of a,a,b,b,a and more or less continues it throughout the poem. Each line has 8 syllables.
Explanation of Language
McCrae uses sophisticated structure for the language used in the poem to portray a sad tone. For Example, 'Loved and were loved, and now we lie'. This example shows that they have died but McCrae uses sad language instead of gruesome language to show this.
Significance of the title
Flanders field is the generic term for the World War 1 battlefields. It is where everything happened; the good and the bad. In the poem 'Flanders field' is used to portray the battlefields in a bad way as it is where all the deaths happened.
Context of the poem
This poem is about how soldiers felt on the battlefields during the war. It also shows how bad the conditions were and how many soldiers died. The poem is sad as the soldiers are talking about dying during war.
Effect on readers
In 1915 when the poem was written, the readers would've not wanted their family members to go to war so this was very bad propaganda for the war.

The effect on the reader now is different as we live in a different time period so we don't know how it feels to live during war and loose someone close to us because of it.
Poetic devices
John McCrae uses alliteration throughout the poem. For example "Flanders fields" and "saw sunset". This was used to add effect to how how reader views it and to allow the poem to flow nicely.

He also uses repetition in his poem. For example "row on row" and he continuously included the phrase "Flanders field". This was used to emphasize the important words in the poem.
Full transcript