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The Effectiveness of Social Media in High School

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on 28 July 2014

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Transcript of The Effectiveness of Social Media in High School

The Effectiveness of Social Media in High School
Michelle Misiewicz
Purpose of Study
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of social media use in high schools. This study will utilize quantitative and qualitative components. This paper examines the role of social media in the high school and how it is being used for communication and whether or not that communication is effective.
Research Questions
Question 1
How is Social Media used to communicate with students?
Question 2
Does Social Media have an effect on learning?
Question 3
Does implementing Social Media in the classroom encourage communication, sharing of ideas and information, and collaboration?
Question 4
How do you measure the effectiveness of your Social Media activities?
Chapter 1
Statement of Problem
Theoretical Framework
Assumputions
Significance of Study
My study will look at different tools and practices teachers have been using in their classroom to see what practices are educationally beneficial. It will look closely at how social media is being used to communicate, share information and ideas, and collaborate, how teachers measure the effectiveness of social media use and what effects does it have on learning.
There are many different social media tools available for teachers and students to use in the educational process. Teachers find it difficult to find a social media tool the will be effective for them to use in their classroom, a tool that will not detract from but enhance the educational process. The best social media tools allow for communication, sharing of information and ideas, and collaboration. The problem are what are the most effective tools and educational practices relating to social media? and How are teachers evaluating the effectiveness of social media use.
Rationale
Method 1
Method 2
The purpose of this study is to find the most effective social media tools for communicating, sharing of information and ideas, and collaboration that are being utilized in high schools. We will look at what types of social media tools they are using and how they are using them in their classrooms and how its effectiveness is evaluated.
The method to evaluate the implementation will be a survey of high school teachers that currently use social media in their classroom.
I will also interview 3 teachers who have been using social media for more than 3 years about their experiences with social media in the classroom.
One of the things I will explore is how teacher and students interact through the use of social media in the classroom to help the learning process be successful. Jane Bozarth has provided insight on to social media and its various uses for communication bringing legitimacy to its use as a communication tool.
Chapter 2
The major assumption of this study is that teachers and students must have access to the Internet and social media resources during the school day. Another assumption is that the participating teachers and schools are allowed to use social media resources with their students, and that those resources are not blocked by filtering software.
The study will look at different tools and practices teachers have been using in their classroom to see what practices are educationally beneficial. It will look closely at how social media is being used to communicate, share information and ideas, and collaborate, how teachers measure the effectiveness of social media use and what effects does it have on learning.
The purpose of this chapter it to review related literature in the area of social media and social media use in the classroom. The chapter contains the history of social media, theoretical framework and chapter summary.

Chapter 4
Chapter 3
History of
Social Media
BIG FISH
Social media has penetrated our lives, and become a time consuming habit for many of its users. José van Dijck in his book “The Culture of Connectivity : a Critical History of Social Media” gives a historical view as well as a critical analysis of major social media platforms. According to the journal article Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship from the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication social media started in 1997. SixDegrees.com allowed users to create profiles, list their Friends and, beginning in 1998, surf the Friends lists. SixDegrees promoted itself as a tool to help people connect with and send messages to others.
History of
Friendster
History of MySpace
History of Facebook
History of Twitter
History of YouTube
History of Wikipedia
Friendster was launched in 2002. The objective was to complement Ryze and be direct competition to match.com. Match.com helped strangers meet. Friendster helped friends of friends meet. According to Boyd in “Friendster lost steam. Is MySpace just a fad?” Friendsters popularity surged but the site encountered technical and social problems. The site was not technically equipped to handle the rapid growth and users became frustrated.
MySpace was launched in 2003 and went virtually unnoticed. The objective was to attract estranged Friendster users. Friendster rumored to adopt a fee based system. Friendster users posted messages encouraging them to join alternate social networking sites. MySpace encountered rapid growth and was able to capitalize on Friendster’s downfalls. Rock bands from Los Angeles also began creating profiles on MySpace and promoting themselves and their events through the site. MySpace differentiated itself by regularly adding features based on user demand (Boyd, 2006) and by allowing users to personalize their pages.
According to Cassidy in “Me media: How hanging out on the Internet became big business”, Facebook began in early 2004 as a Harvard-only social networking site. To join, a user had to have a Harvard email address. As Facebook began supporting other schools, those users were also required to have university email addresses associated with those institutions, a requirement that kept the site relatively closed and contributed to users’ perceptions of the site as an intimate, private community. Beginning in September 2005, Facebook expanded to include high school students, professionals inside corporate networks, and, eventually, everyone.
According to the article “Twitter”, Twitter was created and licensed by employees of the company “Odeo,”. The Odeo Company began as a pod-casting company. When Apple launched pod casting on iTunes, Odeo was in trouble. This small company did not have the means to compete with a conglomerate like Apple. The company’s employees began to brainstorm new ideas, to come up with something different that would take the company in a new direction. Noah Glass, Florian Weber and Jack Dorsey worked in a group together and came up with an idea for a different type of product that users could use to report their “status,” or what they were doing at the time. The idea was that a user could send a text to one number, which would then broadcast the message to their friends, or followers. They named the system “Twttr,” keeping the name similar to other products like “flickr.” They also considered the names FriendStalker and Dodgeball. Eventually “Twttr” changed to “Twitter.” Eventually Twitter split off from to become Twitter Incorporated. Dorsey began to develop new ways to use Twitter including RSS feeds directly into a Web site and using mobile phones, touch pads and more.
According to the “YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture”, YouTube officially launched in June 2005. Chad Hurley, Steve Chen and Jawed Karim founded YouTube. The original idea was to remove the technical barriers of widespread sharing video online. The website provided a very simple, integrated interface that allowed users to upload, publish, and view streaming videos without a high degree of technical knowledge within a browser using limited bandwidth.
According to Rosenzweig in “Can History be Opensource? Wikipedia and the Future of the Past”, Wikipedia traces its roots back to “the ancient Library of Alexandria and Pergamon” and the “concept of gathering all of the world’s knowledge in a single
place. But the more immediate origins are in a project called Nupedia launched in March 2000 by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger. Wales decided to create a free, online encyclopedia. He recruited Sanger to help. Sanger designed Nupedia to ensure that experts wrote and carefully vetted content. Because of that extensive review it required, it managed to publish only about twenty articles in its first eighteen months. In early January 2001, as Sanger was trying to think of ways to make it easier for people without formal credentials to contribute to Nupedia, a computer programmer friend told him about the WikiWikiWeb software, developed by the programmer Ward Cunningham in the mid-1990s, that makes it easy to create or edit a Web page—no coding html or uploading to a server needed. Sanger thought that wiki users would quickly and informally create content for Nupedia that his experts would edit and approve. Nupedia editors did not like the idea and by mid-January Sanger and Wales had given it a separate name, Wikipedia, and its own domain. In less than a month Wikipedia, had 1,000 articles; by the end of its first year, it had 20,000; by the end of its second year, it had 100,000.

This chapter describes the research methods used to investigate the use of social media in high school classrooms. To collect data for this qualitative study the researcher designed a survey. An invitation to participate will be sent to 100 high school teachers. The invitation will contain a paper survey they can be completed and returned along with a link to an online survey if they would prefer to complete the survey that way.
Questions 1 and 2
Questions 3
Questions 4, 5 and 6
Question 7
Questions 8, 9 and 10
Questions 11 and 12
Sample Survey
The Pilot Study
Expected Outcomes
The study will contain a pilot study. The purpose of the pilot study is to validate the reliability of the research questions. Teachers familiar to the researcher will serve in the pilot group. The rapport with these teachers and their availability for discussions will provide invaluable information to the researcher.
My expected outcomes will be that most teachers do not use social media in the classroom. Teachers who do use social media in the classroom will find it an effective tool for communication and collaboration. I also expect to find that students and teachers use social media more for personal use than for educational purposes.
1. My gender is? (circle one)
male female

2. What range best describes your age?
_____ 22 – 30 years old
_____ 31 – 40 years old
_____ 41 – 50 years old
_____51 – 60 years old
_____60+ years old

3. How many years have you been in the teaching profession?
_____ this is my first year
_____1-3 years
_____ 4 – 6 years
_____7 – 10 years
_____ 10 – 15 years
_____ 16 – 20 years
_____ 21 – 25 years
_____ 26 – 30 years
_____ 30+ years



4. Do you use social media for personal reasons? (circle one)
yes no

5. Have you used social media in your classroom for educational purposes? (circle one) If no is answered no further questions need to be answered.
yes no

6. How often do you use social media in your class?
_____ more than once a day
_____ once a day
_____ once a week
_____ less than once a week

7. What social media tools do you use in your classroom?
_____ blog
_____ wikispace
_____ Twitter
_____ Facebook
_____ social bookmarking
_____ Voicethread
_____ other – please list ___________________


8. Do you use social media to communicate information such as announcements to parents and students? (circle one)
yes no

9. What is your primary use of social media in your classroom?


10. Does social media have a positive effect on learning in your class? (circle one)
yes no

11. Does social media encourage communication in your classroom? (circle one)
yes no

12. How do you measure the effectiveness of social media in your classroom?

The purpose of this study is to look at different social media tools and what educational practices teachers have been using in their classroom in regards to social media to see what practices are educationally beneficial. It will look closely at how social media is being used to communicate, share information and ideas, and collaborate, how teachers measure the effectiveness of social media use and what effects does it have on learning. The purpose of this chapter is to analyze the data and report the findings of the research questions from Chapter 1:
1. How is social media used to communicate with students?
2. Does social media have an effect on learning?
3. Does implementing social media in the classroom encourage communication?
4. How do you measure the effectiveness of your social media activities?

Tables
Table 1
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Social Media Use in Schools by Gender as Reported by Respondents to Survey
____________________________________

Classification of Number of Percentage of
Gender Responses Responses
____________________________________

Male 50 50%

Female 50 50%

Total 100 100%

Social Media Use in Schools by Age Range as Reported by Respondents to Survey
___________________________________

Classification of Number of Percentage of
Age Range Responses Responses
___________________________________

22 – 30 years old 20 20%
31 – 40 years old 20 20%
41 – 50 years old 20 20%
51 – 60 years old 20 20%
60+ years old 20 20%
Total 100 100%

Social Media Use in Schools by Years of Experience as Reported by Respondents to Survey
____________________________________

Classification of Number of Percentage of
Years of Service Responses Responses
____________________________________

this is my first year 11 11%
1-3 years 11 11%
4 – 6 years 11 11%
7 – 10 years 11 11%
10 – 15 years 11 11%
16 – 20 years 11 11%
21 – 25 years 11 11%
26 – 30 years 11 11%
30+ years 13 13%
Total 100 100%

Social Media Use for Personal Reasons as Reported by Respondents to Survey
____________________________________

Classification of Number of Percentage of
Personal Use Responses Responses
____________________________________

Yes 50 50%

No 50 50%

Total 100 100%

Jane Bozarth
Jane Hart
Bozarth, J. (2010). SOCIAL MEDIA FOR TRAINERS: Techniques for Enhancing and Extending Learning. San Francisco USA: Pfeiffer.

Bozarth, J. (2013). Social learning for the government workforce. S.l.: Amer Soc For Training &.

Bozarth, J. (2010). Social media for trainers: Techniques for enhancing and extending learning. San Francisco: Pfeiffer.

Hart, J. (2011). Social learning handbook. Centre for Learning & Performance
Technologies.

Hart, J. (2013, September 22). Top 100 Tools for Learning. . Retrieved July 1, 2014, from
http://c4lpt.co.uk/top100tools/
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