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subtractive schooling caring relations and social capital in

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lama alsh3

on 30 September 2013

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Transcript of subtractive schooling caring relations and social capital in

subtractive schooling caring relations and social capital in the schooling of u.s.-mexican youth 1998
(Angela Valenzuela)

Angela Valenzuela
-She is currently an associate professor in Curriculum and Instruction and Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.
- She received her doctorate in Sociology from Stanford University in 1990.
-Her current research interests include: Sociology of Education, Urban Education, Race and Ethnicity in the Schools, Multicultural Education, and Public Policy.
The Seguin High School Study
-Subtractive Schooling was written by Angela Valenzuela after she completed an ethnographic study of schooling conditions in the seguin high school.
Subtractive Schooling provides a framework for understanding the patterns of immigrant achievement and U.S.-born underachievement frequently noted in the literature and observed by Valenzuela in her ethnographic account of regular-track youth attending a comprehensive, virtually all-Mexican, inner-city high school in Houston.
-She studies teacher-student dynamics, and how many students are given the impression that teachers do not care how they fare in school.
-She also studies rifts between U.S. born and Mexican born students and the effect it has on both groups.
-She also brings up a very important issue about Mexican students who refuse to excel academically.
-She uses student quotes and classroom observations to illustrate what these students are feeling and experiencing.
-A key consequence is the erosion of students' social capital evident in the absence of academically-oriented networks among acculturated, U.S.-born youth.


Dr. Valenzuela's research reminds educators, learners, and researchers that they must reconsider their politics and practices of caring when working with young students and thinkers of Mexican origin
-valenzuela beliefs that although it is up to each school to determine what a more additive perspective might entail, his study suggests that an important point of departure is a critical examination of the existing curriculum
-The Seguin High is a large, comprehensive, inner-city high school located in the Houston Independent School District.
-The high school was majority Mexican and Mexican-American students.
The Concept of Subtractive Schooling
Valenzuela presents us with a study of both U.S. born and Mexican born students within American public schools:-
Thank you

EDB 612 , karen Boyle

Lama Alshathri
The Message
The process of Subtractive Schooling
-Valenzuela argues that schools subtract resources from youth in two major ways:


Firstly :-
involves a process of "de-Mexicanization," or subtracting students' culture and language, which is consequential to their achievement and orientations toward school.

Secondly
-involves the role of caring between teachers and students in the educational process.

-regarding caring, teachers expect students to care about school in technical fashion before they care for them, while students expect teachers to care for them before they care about school.
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