Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Flame Color Test

Determining the Makeup of Metals and Metal Salts by the Flame Color
by

William Foner

on 12 April 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Flame Color Test

Metals Can Be Identified by the Color of Flame Created When Burned
William Foner
Grade 8
Ms. Lindsay Allmon
Identifying Metals by Flame Color
The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that metals give off specific colors when they burn.
The question to be answered is can metals be detected in compounds by observing the flame color.
The knowledge from this experiment will help other scientists determine the make up of compounds by flame color.
Purpose
If certain metals are present in compounds then the color of the flame will correspond to their known color.
Both cations and anions are responsible for flame colors.
Flame colors are produced when heat causes electrons to transfer valences and then return to their original valence. As the electron returns, it emits energy that is visible as color.
Hypothesis
"Flame Colors - A Demonstration." The Nuffield
Foundation. Nuffieldfoundation.org. 2007. Web. 12
Sept. 2012.
The electrons in the metals get excited by heat and when they fall back to their original valence they change color.
Background Research
Helmenstine, Anne Marie. “Chemistry of Firework Colors.” About.com. Web. 25 Oct. 2012.

When electrons release energy and go back to lower-energy levels are released.
“Pure colors require pure ingredients.”
Background Research
Mukherjee, Bidish. “Properties of Alkali Metals.”
Buzzle.com. Web. 25 Oct. 2012.

Metals give off colored flames.
The alkali metals include lithium, sodium and potassium.
Background Research
Roy, Ken. "Flame Tests: A Burning Safety Issue."
Science Scope 32.1 (2008): 10-12. OmniFile Full
Text Mega (H.W. Wilson). Web. 25 Oct. 2012.

The purpose of flame tests is to identify unknown metals and metalloid ions.Safety is crucial in any flame test. Wear protective goggles, have a water source nearby and beware of ingesting or inhaling harmful odors.
Background Research
Sanger, Michael J. "Flame Tests: Which Ion Causes the Color?” Journal of Chemical Education. 81.12 (2004): OmniFile Full Text Mega (H.W. Wilson). Web. 25 Oct. 2012.
Atoms, alkali metals, alkali earth metals, and copper emit wave lengths in the visible wave lengths. Most flame colors are produced by cat-ions which are positively charge(such as Na+). Some anions which are negatively charged (such as Cl-) can produce flame test colors.
Background Research
These are the variables in this experiment:
Constant: The Flame
Dependent Variable: Flame Color
Independent Variables: Calcium Chloride, Sodium Chloride, Magnesium Sulfate, Copper and Nickel
Experimental Design
The metal salts were a four inch stripped copper wire, a four inch stripped nickel wire, 1/2 teaspoon of epsom salt (Magnesium sulfate), /2 teaspoon of canning salt (Calcium chloride, 1/2 teaspoon of table salt (Sodium Chloride).
The flame was provided by a commercial kitchen range.
A spoon and tongs were used to hold the salts in the flame.
Protective eye gear.
Materials
The steps we took to complete the experiment were:
1.The copper wire, nickel wire, epsom salt, table salt, and canning salt were collected.
2. The eyewear was put on.
3. The epsom, table and canning salt were measured out with 1/2 teaspoon and placed in pyrex glass bowls.
4. The stripped 4” copper and nickel wires were laid out with the tongs.
5. The flame was turned on the stove.
Procedure
6. The first salt was the calcium chloride which was
placed in the spoon so that the crystals extended beyond the spoon. The spoon was held in the flame so that the flame hit the salt. The salts were put in the trash and the spoon was wiped clean.The flame color was recorded.
7. The second salt was the sodium chloride which was placed in the spoon so that the crystals extended beyond the spoon. The spoon was held in the flame so that the flame hit the salt. The salts were put in the trash and the spoon was wiped clean.The flame color was recorded.
8. The third salt was the magnesium sulfate which was placed in the spoon so that the crystals extended beyond the spoon. The spoon was held in the flame so that the flame hit the salt. The salts were put in the trash and the spoon was wiped clean. The flame color was recorded.
Data Analysis
The results were that calcium chloride gave a red flame color, sodium chloride gave a yellow/orange flame color, magnesium sulfate gave off a white flame color, copper gave a green color, and nickel gave a green flame color.
The flame colors indicate the presence of the metal and metal salts.
The flame colors produced indicate the presence of the metal and metal salts.
These results supported the hypothesis because the unique flame colors for the metals were produced. The compounds with chloride and sulfate as in the sodium chloride and calcium chloride and magnesium sulfate were not affected by the presence of the chloride or sulfate.
These results matched the background research.
The flame colors were produced because the flame color for chloride and sulfate did not interfere with the metals.
There were no known errors in the experiment.
This experiment could be improved by using more metals.
What further study could be done from this experiment?
Conclusions


"Flame Colors - A Demonstration." The Nuffield Foundation. Nuffieldfoundation.org. 2007. Web. 18

Sept. 2012.

Helmenstine, Anne Marie. “Chemistry of Firework Colors.” About.com. Web. 25 Oct. 2012.

Mukherjee, Bidish. “Properties of Alkali Metals.” Buzzle.com. Web. 25 Oct. 2012.

Roy, Ken. "Flame Tests: A Burning Safety Issue." Science Scope 32.1 (2008): 10-12.

OmniFile Full Text Mega (H.W. Wilson). Web. 25 Oct. 2012.

Sanger, Michael J. "Flame Tests: Which Ion Causes the Color?” Journal of Chemical Education.

81.12 (2004): OmniFile Full Text Mega (H.W. Wilson) Web. 25 Oct. 2012.
Bibliography
Results
Copper Wire Flame Test
Full transcript