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Mythological Allusions in Modern Media

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Anamarie Tomaich

on 27 February 2014

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Transcript of Mythological Allusions in Modern Media

Literature
Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
Movies
The Matrix
Movies
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Ambrosia Natural Foods
Literature
Macbeth


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Mythological Allusions in Modern Media
Food of the Gods
Ambrosia is sometimes the food, or drink, of the gods. It is often depicted as conferring ageless immortality. The name of the food company implies that the food produced has the quality of the food that only gods eat.
The Three Fates
In Shakespeare's play, there are three witches that inform Macbeth, the main character, that he will be king. In Greek Mythology there are three fates that weave the threads of human destiny. They take delight in their power of foretelling the future, like the three witches in
Macbeth.
Inception
Eos Lip Balm
Anamarie Tomaich
Hour 3

Eos- Goddess of the Dawn
Eos, at the start of each day, would disperse "mists of the night" with her rays of light. The lip balm company uses the name Eos to imply that this brand of chap stick will hydrate your lips much longer because like the goddess bringing moisture to the Earth, it will bring moisture to your lips.
a play by William Shakespeare
by Walt Disney Company
Judgement of Paris
Eris, the goddess of discord, caused a dispute because she was upset that she was not invited to Thetis' wedding. To disrupt the wedding, Eris threw apples, one bearing the engraving "For the Fairest One" which was claimed by three goddesses. Zeus, king of the gods, asked Paris, prince of Troy, to judge the three goddesses, Athena, Hera, and Aphrodite, on which one was the most fair. In Snow White the apple given to Snow White is the apple of discord. The Evil Queen is determined to be the fairest of them all but Snow White stands in her way. Both the Trojan War and the story of Snow White is fueled by wanting to be the fairest.
"Killing swine" (1.3.2.), answers the Second Witch, when the First Witch asks her what she has been doing. A little later in the scene, the witches meet Macbeth and Banquo, and give their prophetic greetings to Macbeth: "All hail, Macbeth, thou shalt be king hereafter!" (1.3.50), and to Banquo:"Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none" (1.3.67).
Textual Evidence
Textual Support
“Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the fairest of them all?”
The Queen, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)
Morpheus Greek God of Dreams
The mythical Morpheus and his family live in The Dream World of Morpheus where they are guarded by two monsters. Morpheus sends dreams out of the Dream World through one of two gates. One gate sends true dreams and the other sends false dreams. In
The Matrix
, Morpheus offers Neo a red pill or a blue pill one of which awakens Neo from his sleep and places him into the world of reality instead of a world of illusions . Morpheus, the god, and Morpheus, the
Matrix
character, both have the powers to offer the truth or a lie in the form of dreams.
Princess Ariadne and the Labyrinth
Art
Art
Music
Music
George W. Bush
by Paul Conrad
Sisyphus
The infant Hercules and the Standard Oil serpents
by Frank Arthur
Sleeping With Sirens
Hercules
Sirens
Don't Look Back
by She & Him
Orpheus and Eurydice
Textual Support
In the myth, Ariadne helps Theseus through the labyrinth by providing him with string and a sword to kill the Minotaur. While in
Inception
the "monster" in the dream was a projection from the subconscious mind instead of the Minotaur. The complex dream represents the labyrinth and when the main protagonist goes through it Ariadne, the architect and creator, helps because she is the only one knowshow to decipher it. Ariadne's name is a movie allusion to Princess Ariadne of Crete because both know the pathways through the mazes.
Sirens are often recognized as mermaids, half-women, half-fish, that lead sailors to their death by singing melodious songs and showing them their true desires. The meaning of the band name Sleeping With Sirens alludes that they have given into their desires and are now in love and have joined the sirens. Also, the band could be referring that their songs are so pleasing to the ear that they sound like sirens.
And you can work to save your love
You can bear it from the earth below
You can work, but you can't let go
Oh, oh, but you have to know




Don't look back
All you'll ever get is the dust from the steps before
I don't have to see you every day, but I just want to know you're there
The myth of Orpheus and Eurydice starts when Eurydice gets bitten by a poisonous snake, dies, and goes to the Underworld. Orpheus, unable to bear living with out his one true love, travels to the Underworld to plead Hades to let her go. His strategy was to remind Hades that
he
suffers from love too and that he will get Eurydice's soul eventually. Hades agrees only if Orpheus does not look back on his departure from the Underworld. Unfortunately for Orpheus, he looks back and Eurydice disappears forever. The analogy of "not looking back" is important to both the story and the song. In the song it is saying that you have to force yourself not to look back because if you do all you will have is memories. Although Orpheus' story was not a break up, he still had to live with the painful memories.

According to Greek myth, Sisyphus, as a punishment for killing people, had to roll a rock up to the top of a mountain only for it to roll right back down. George W. Bush illustrates this punishment in the political cartoon but instead of the it being a punishment it represents the Iraq war. President Bush spent trillions of dollars to help the Iraqis against terrorists. While this might have helped the situation in the Middle East, it caused a rapid decrease in the United States economy. Sisyphus and Bush worked to push the rock/fight the war and in the end it eventually crashed down upon them.
In the political cartoon Theodore Roosevelt is being compared to Hercules. When Hercules was an infant Hera, Zeus' wife, sent two poisonous serpents to kill him but Hercules strangled them in each hand before they could bite him. Roosevelt is shown strangling two well-known business owners John D. Rockefeller and James Pierpont Morgan. Both men were consolidating smaller businesses and creating monopolies. Standard Oil, owned by Rockefeller and Morgan, was a giant oil company that would go to extremes to remain the richest. When Roosevelt was elected president he worked on "strangling" or eliminating big businesses from creating monopolies and hurting the American society. Hercules and Roosevelt gripped the threat and demolished it.
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