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Rome

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nicholas foley

on 9 March 2014

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Transcript of Rome

Rome Past and Present
TURANTULAS
Affinity Project by Nicholas Foley
Architecture Continued-2

The economy of Rome depends to a very large extent on the tourist trade.
Rome is also a center of banking, insurance, printing, publishing, and fashion.
Italy's movie industry (founded in 1936) is located at nearby Cinecitta.

Aside from modern residential quarters, the right-bank section of Rome contains Vatican City, including Saint Peter's Church, the Castel Sant' Angelo, and the ancient quarter of Trastevere. In describing the larger left-bank section one may use the Piazza Venezia, a central square, as a convenient point of departure. It lies at the foot of the old Capitol (see Capitoline Hill) and borders on the huge monument to King Victor Emmanuel II and on the Palazzo Venezia, a Renaissance palace from the balcony of which Mussolini used to address the crowds. A broad avenue, the Via dei Fori Imperiali, runs from the Piazza Venezia SE to the Colosseum, leaving the Emperors' Fora and at a distance the Church of St. Peter in Chains (San Pietro in Vincoli) to the left, and the Capitol and the ancient Forum to the right. From the Colosseum the Via di San Gregorio continues south past the Arch of Constantine and the Baths of Caracalla to the Appian Way. There, as in other places on the outskirts of Rome, are large catacombs. From the Piazza Venezia another modern thoroughfare, the Via del Mare, leads southwestward to the Tiber and then east past the Basilica of St. Paul's Outside the Walls (San Paolo fuori le Mure) to Ostia, Rome's ancient port now blocked by silt, to the sea at Lido di Roma.


Present Day Economy

Roman Empire

Present Government is Democratic.

Present Economy Continued

Rome is the capital of Italy

Present Day Rome

The Roman government (in its entire history from founding to fall) was a strange mix of a democracy and a republic. An interesting fact is that the people of Rome took many of their ideas of government from the Ancient Greeks.
The Roman state was described as the republic and its consuls, or chief magistrates, continued to be appointed even after the establishment of one-man rule under the empire, but in its pure form it lasted only until the beginning of the first century B.C.

At the creation of the republic, supreme power probably resided with a popular assembly, but early on theSenate became very influential, and the traditional formula, which survived for centuries, was S.P.Q.R. - Senatus Populusque Romanus - the Roman Senate and People acting together.
Since the Ancient Romans did not want one man to make all of the laws, they decided to balance the power of the government between three branches, there was first the executive branch, then the legislative branch, and finally the judicial branch.


Ancient Government

Roman agriculture changed as the Empire progressed. In the beginning, the main source of agriculture were small estates cultivated and owned by small farmers. This was subsistence farming since they only grew enough to feed their own families. However, as the empire became increasingly military and it became involved in more wars, the taxes also increased. The small farmers couldn't afford to keep their land and had to sell to a big landowner for protection and help. This caused the main agriculture unit to become the latifundia, or a huge estate owned by a single owner and operated by many slaves.

Economy Continued

Ancient Rome

Nicholas Foley
March 3, 2014

My Affinity Project

Ancient Rome’s Economy

Roman economy was mostly based on agriculture and trade.

Rome profited from the economy its wealthiness funded other cool buildings and art.

Copper, gold and iron were most important industry.

Romes riches also funded roads, aqueducts and other public projects


The Romans traded within the empire and with other empires.
The Romans built roads and great ships as a way of transport. They used silver, gold, and sometimes bronze coins as a means to trade for goods.

The value of a coin was equal to the value of the precious metal it contained. A much larger bronze coin contained the same value as a smaller silver coin. The coins would have a picture of the emperor on one side and a message on the other. The message was used to bring attention to the accomplishments of the ruler. For example, some coins commemorated victories in wars while others were about the construction of important structures. Some of the coins used symbolism that would be clear to all. For example, the female figure of Felicitas was the personification of happiness and symbolized that things were going well for the Empire and emperor. The coins were really used as a means of propaganda since they were easy to mass reproduce and distribute.

Aside from modern residential quarters, the right-bank section of Rome contains Vatican City, including Saint Peter's Church, the Castel Sant' Angelo, and the ancient quarter of Trastevere. In describing the larger left-bank section one may use the Piazza Venezia, a central square, as a convenient point of departure. It lies at the foot of the old Capitol (see Capitoline Hill) and borders on the huge monument to King Victor Emmanuel II and on the Palazzo Venezia, a Renaissance palace from the balcony of which Mussolini used to address the crowds. A broad avenue, the Via dei Fori Imperiali, runs from the Piazza Venezia SE to the Colosseum, leaving the Emperors' Fora and at a distance the Church of St. Peter in Chains (San Pietro in Vincoli) to the left, and the Capitol and the ancient Forum to the right. From the Colosseum the Via di San Gregorio continues south past the Arch of Constantine and the Baths of Caracalla to the Appian Way. There, as in other places on the outskirts of Rome, are large catacombs. From the Piazza Venezia another modern thoroughfare, the Via del Mare, leads southwestward to the Tiber and then east past the Basilica of St. Paul's Outside the Walls (San Paolo fuori le Mure) to Ostia, Rome's ancient port now blocked by silt, to the sea at Lido di Roma.

The narrow and busy Via del Corso leads N from the Piazza Venezia past the Piazza Colonna (now the heart of Rome) to the Piazza del Popolo at the gate of the old Flaminian Way.
East of the Piazza del Popolo are the Pincian Hill, commanding one of the finest views of Rome, and the famous Borghese Villa. In the widest westward bend of the Tiber, W of the Via del Corso, is the Campo Marzio quarter (anciently, Campus Martius), where most of the medieval buildings are located; there also are the Pantheon (now a church) and the parliament buildings. To the east of the Via del Corso the fashionable Via Condotti leads to the Piazza di Spagna; a flight of 132 steps ascends from that square to the Church of the Santa Trinità dei Monti and the Villa Medici. The Quirinal palace is NE of the Piazza Venezia. In the southeastern section, near the gate of San Giovanni, are the Lateran buildings.

As an educational center Rome possesses—aside from the Univ. of Rome (founded 1303)—the colleges of the church, several academies of fine arts, and the Accademia di Santa Cecilia (founded 1584), the world's oldest academy of music.
The opera house is one of Europe's grandest. The various institutes of the Univ. of Rome were formerly scattered throughout the city but were transferred in 1935 to the northeastern section.
Among the countless churches of Rome there are five patriarchal basilicas—St. Peter's, St. John Lateran, St. Mary Major (Santa Maria Maggiore), St. Lawrence Outside the Walls, and St. Paul's Outside the Walls. With the exception of St. Mary Major, the basilicas and other ancient churches occupy the sites of martyrs' tombs. Characteristic of the old Roman churches are their fine mosaics (4th–12th cent.) and the use of colored marble for decoration, introduced in the 12th cent. by the workers in marble known as Cosmati. Rome's first mosque opened in 1995.

In the past half century Rome has expanded well beyond the walls started in the 3d cent. by Emperor Aurelian, and it now extends north to the Aniene.
Long sections of the ancient walls have been preserved, however, and archaeology remains an essential element of modern city-planning in Rome. Ancient marble columns and ruins rising beside modern apartments and offices, noisy boulevards, and luxurious villas and gardens characterize the modern city of Rome. As in ancient times, the larger section of Rome lies on the left bank of the Tiber, which intersects the city in three wide curves and is spanned by over 20 bridges

Architecture
Architecture Continued-3
The narrow and busy Via del Corso leads N from the Piazza Venezia past the Piazza Colonna (now the heart of Rome) to the Piazza del Popolo at the gate of the old Flaminian Way.
East of the Piazza del Popolo are the Pincian Hill, commanding one of the finest views of Rome, and the famous Borghese Villa. In the widest westward bend of the Tiber, W of the Via del Corso, is the Campo Marzio quarter (anciently, Campus Martius), where most of the medieval buildings are located; there also are the Pantheon (now a church) and the parliament buildings. To the east of the Via del Corso the fashionable Via Condotti leads to the Piazza di Spagna; a flight of 132 steps ascends from that square to the Church of the Santa Trinità dei Monti and the Villa Medici. The Quirinal palace is NE of the Piazza Venezia. In the southeastern section, near the gate of San Giovanni, are the Lateran buildings.

Architecture Continued-4
Among Rome's many palaces and villas the Farnese Palace (begun 1514) and the Farnesina (1508–11) are particularly famous; others, all dating from the 17th cent., are those of the great Roman families, the Colonna, Chigi, Torlonia, and Doria.
Rome is celebrated for its beautiful Renaissance and baroque fountains, such as the ornate Fontana di Trevi (18th cent.). Its richest museums and libraries are in the Vatican. Others include the National (in the Villa Giulia), Capitoline, and Torlonia museums, notable for their antiquities; and the Borghese, Corsini, Doria, and Colonna collections of paintings.

Architecture Continued-5
Rome is governed by a city council with eighty members included. Every member has a 4-year term, and only one member is elected mayor. Eighteen of those members are elected to the City Executive Committee. 15 departments direct the city's affairs and needs: Health, markets, public works, and transportation. Since Rome is the national capital, it holds the seat for the Italian government (national govt.). It runs the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of Italy itself.

Architecture
Many Roman homes had a pool.
Romans built the worlds first high apartments.
They made the first shopping mall.
There were few people who had there own kitchen.
They had few universities or schools .
They had public baths. The men and women went at different times.
They had colosseums, where they would have shows and battles between animals battling people or gladiators fighting gladiators.


Ancient Rome

Ancient Roman Achitecture
The Roman Forum with the Pantheon on top
Pantheon Today
Architecture
Architecture
Colosseum Today

Cats in the Roman Forum
Architecture
Population:1,000,000 at 100A.D
Population:2,700,000 December 2011
Full transcript