Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

THESIS

No description
by

Dara Dator

on 4 January 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of THESIS

RESULTS Research Paradigm 2013 2009 2010 2011 2012 0 + - = 9 8 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 c Phase 3: Preparation of Gabi for the Test Organism

Gabi media was used in this study. It was prepared by weighing 250 grams of Gabi and was added with 20 grams of sugar, was boiled for 20 minutes to obtain the decoction, afterwards the solid part of the Gabi was removed and added with approximately 15 grams of gulaman as solidifying agent and dissolve it in a sterile 1000 ml capacity beaker by adding distilled water to attain 1 liter solution. After preparing the solution, it was covered with clean cotton with gauze and was covered with aluminum foil; it was sterilized for 30 minutes at 15 pound per square inch pressure (psi) in an autoclave. After sterilization, approximately 20 ml was poured sterile onto sterile petri plates added with 1ml of water samples from the faucet and allowed to harden. This was incubated at room temperature in an inverted position to avoid atmospheric contamination. When the medium had already solidified, the bacterial organism was incorporated and incubated for a maximum 18 hours to show their growth on an agar at 37°C.
Phase 2: Preparation of Sweet Camote for the Test Organism

Sweet Camote media was used in this study. It was prepared by weighing 250 grams of Sweet Camote and was added with 20 grams of sugar, was boiled for 20 minutes to obtain the decoction, afterwards the solid part of the Sweet Camote was removed and added with approximately 15 grams of gulaman as solidifying agent and dissolve it in a sterile 1000 ml capacity beaker by adding distilled water to attain 1 liter solution. After preparing the solution, it was covered with clean cotton with gauze and was covered with aluminum foil, it was sterilized for 30 minutes at 15 pound per square inch pressure (psi) in an autoclave. After sterilization, approximately 20 ml was poured sterile onto sterile petri plates added with 1ml of water samples from the faucet and allowed to harden. This was incubated at room temperature in an inverted position to avoid atmospheric contamination. When the medium had already solidified, the bacterial organism was incorporated and incubated for a maximum 18 hours to show their growth on an agar at 37°C.
Introduction Culture media was used in many different activities in microbiology, it was an essential
material in order to observe and quantify the microorganism. Early studies of bacteria were difficult. In any environment many types of bacteria compete and cooperate, and all this activity makes it nearly impossible to figure out what each organism is doing. The first step was to separate different types of bacteria. One way of isolating bacteria was to grow them on a solid surface. Scientists first used kitchen foods, such as a potato slice cut with a sterile knife, on which to grow bacteria that attack plants. This method was not very convenient, however.
The perfect medium or environment for growing bacteria also came from the kitchen, although its usefulness was demonstrated in the laboratory of German scientist Robert Koch. The medium was agar, a gel-forming substance that comes from seaweed. A coworker of Koch’s noted that his wife’s puddings remained solid in summer heat, whereas the gelatin on which he grew bacteria dissolved or got eaten by the bacteria. The firm puddings contained agar.
In the continuous search on alternative ways on how to facilitate and found a new technology, the researchers look forward in determining the indigenous type of culture media which can be available to market and will be much economical compared to the commercially prepared culture media. General Procedure Hypotheses
1. The selected plants such as potato, sweet camote and gabi cannot be used as substitute for culture media.
2. There are limited types of gram positive and gram negative bacteria that can grow in alternative culture media.
3. Temperature and specific time the bacteria were exposed to the indigenous substitute for culture media did not affect the process.
4. Using indigenous media are not feasible in terms of expenses.
5. There is no significant difference among the three treatments in terms of number of colony forming units. Statement Of the Problem 1. Are the selected plants such as
potato, sweet camote and gabi can be
used as substitute for culture media?
2. Are there limited types of gram
positive and gram negative bacteria
that the alternative culture media can
test?
3. Can temperature and specific time
the bacteria were exposed to the
indigenous substitute for culture
media may affect the process?
4. Is using indigenous media feasible
in terms of expenses?
5. Is there a significant difference
between the three treatments in terms of number of colony forming units? Significance of the Study To the Researchers: This study made them curious about everything around them and in which it does have a potential to be used in the near future. Lastly, it presented them the opportunity to create and produce original contributions to the scientific knowledge.

To the School: The said study made the objectives of the school into reality in which is to harness the critical thinking skills of the students.

To the Future Researcher: The result of this study was used as a review of related literature that could help them for their researches related with this study.

To the Community: Whether it is our environment or we as mankind, community are all benefited from this study that led the researchers to discover things that people didn’t think that has any potential use beyond its common usage.
Development of Indigenous Culture
for Routine Microtechnic Education Phase 1: Preparation of Potatoes for the Test Organism
Indigenous media was used in this study. It was prepared by weighing 250 grams of potatoe and was added with 20 grams of sugar, was boiled for 20 minutes to obtain the decoction, afterwards the solid part of the potato was removed and added with approximately 15 grams of gulaman as solidifying agent and dissolve it in a sterile 1000 ml capacity beaker by adding distilled water to attain 1 liter solution. After preparing the solution, it was covered with clean cotton with gauze and covered with aluminum foil; it was sterilized for 30 minutes at 15 pound per square inch pressure (psi) in an autoclave. After sterilization, approximately 20 ml was poured sterile onto sterile petri plates added with 1ml of water samples from the faucet and allowed to harden. This was incubated at room temperature in an inverted position to avoid atmospheric contamination. When the medium had already solidified, the bacterial organism was incorporated and incubated for a maximum 18 hours to show their growth on an agar at 37°C. SUMMARY, CONCLUSION and BIBLIOGRAPHY Summary of Findings
The media used in the study for growing bacteria showed potential in culturing microorganisms and can be therefore used a substitute for commercially prepared culture media. Among the three treatments, sweet camote, potato and gabi, the potato decoction obtained the highest bacterial colony which indicates that decoctions of potato are more suitable for the growth of microorganisms. Also the alternative culture media can cultivate various types of bacteria thus indicating that the media can accommodate almost all kinds of microorganisms.
As the experiment was being conducted, the researchers observed that the longer the treatments are incubated at 37°C, the larger the population of microorganisms that will yield in the culture media.
The purpose of the study was to show the potential of using indigenous culture media as an alternative to commercial media. Indigenous media is feasible in terms of expenses. With just Php30, solutions of 1000 mL for each media can be prepared compared to the prices of the commercial media.

Conclusions
Based on the findings of the study and as shown on the interpretation of the results, the researchers therefore conclude that potato, gabi and sweet camote is effective as a culture media for determining presence of bacteria. The following conclusions were formulated:
1.That among all the treatments the potatoes showed more potential in the cultivation of microorganisms.
2.In addition, other treatments were used as a substitute in the absence of potatoes.
3.Longer incubation time given to the culture media yielded to increase in the number of organisms that are susceptible to microorganism.
4.Indigenous media is feasible in terms of expenses. With just Php30, solutions of 1000 mL for each media can be prepared compared to the prices of the commercial media.
5.Among the three treatments, sweet camote, potato and gabi, the potato decoction obtained the highest bacterial colony which indicates that decoctions of potato are more suitable for the growth of microorganisms
Recommendations
Based on the conclusions, the researchers recommend the following for further research and understanding:
1.Potatoes decoction can be used in the absence of commercially prepared culture media;
2.Other indigenous materials can be evaluated in media cultivation such as beef or cassava which contains a high concentration of nutrients.
3.Study along this line and similar in nature can be conducted.
BIBLIOGRAPHY

BANWART J.B. (2012). Basic Food Microbiology. pp. 478 and 603. Westport, Connecticut. AVI Publishing Company, Inc.

BELITZ H.D. and GROSCH W. (1999). Food Chemistry.2nd edition. pp. 914 - 915. Springer-Verlag Berlin.

CORALE, L. and NACNION. (1982). The Science Involved in Vinegar Making.Inquiry.6 (20); 18.

DESROSIER N.W. (1970). The Technology of Food Preservation. pp. 248-256. Westport, Connecticut. The AVI Publishing Company, Inc.

DIOKNO-PALO N., HUSMILLO l. l., MARTIN M. P. and ONA E.O. (1988). Some Factors Influencing Acetic Vinegar Production Using Coconut Water by Acetobacter Strains in Submerge Process. Philippine Technology Journal. Vol.13 no. 1 pp 69-83.

ESTAFIA, N. C. (1972). Science Bulletin of the science Foundation of the Philippines. pp.25.

FRAZIER, W.C. (2006). Food Microbiology.2nd ed. pp. 398-405. New York. McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc.

FROBISHER M. (1968). Fundamentals of Microbiology. pp. 588-599. Philadelphia. W.B. Saunders Company.

FROBISHER, M., R.D. HINDILL, K.T. CRABTREE and K. R. GOODHEART. (1974).Fundamentals of Microbiology.9th ed. pp.18-19. Tokyo, Japan. Toppan Company, Limited.

HENSON, R.M. (1981). Vinegar-Sour sap that spells sweet gains. Modern Agricultural and Industry Asia: Vol. 9 (3-4); 11.

PACABA, V.T. (1996). Preservation of Fruits and Vegetables. pp.18-19. Quezon City. Phoenix Press, Inc.

PELCZAR, M.J. (1986). Microbiology 5thed. New York.McGraw Hill Publishing Co.

SUMAYA, O.V. (1977). Cheap Source of Quality Vinegar.Agricultural and Industrial life. Vol.3 (1-3); 20.

TORTORA, G.J., FUNKIE, B.R. and CASE, C.L. (1992). Microbiology, An Introduction. (4thed.). California.The Benjamin / CumminPublishing Company, Inc.

WEISER, H.H., G.J. MOUNTNEY and W.A. GOULD. (1971). Food Microbiology Technology.2nd ed. pp.148-154. Westport Connecticut. AVI Pub. Company, Inc.
Full transcript