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Tabloids and broadsheets

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on 16 October 2013

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Transcript of Tabloids and broadsheets

Broadsheet
TABLOIDS
NEWSPAPERS
Double click to crop it if necessary
(cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr
(cc) photo by Franco Folini on Flickr
(cc) photo by jimmyharris on Flickr
(cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr
informal language
Report the news, but in a more light-hearted way
Focus more on entertainment, celebrity gossip, and sport
Use more informal language
Unlike broadsheets, they have just one main newspaper section (no supplements)
Aimed at working class
More subjective reporting
Cheaper to buy – between 20p-50p
Language used in Tabloids
WHO? WHAT?
WHERE?
WHEN? WHY?

HOW?

PUPILS GO ON RAMPAGE
By COLIN RANDALL

POLICE were called to a comprehensive school in Devon yesterday to quell a disturbance involving at least 60 pupils. Officers went to the 1700-pupil mixed school in Bideford after nearby residents reported a "developing riot." The trouble, described by Devon County Council as "a disturbance rather than a riot," occurred at lunchtime when only Mr John Dare, the headmaster, and two members of staff were available to supervise pupils because of the teachers' pay dispute. Several windows were smashed by children throwing bottles and stones. Police restored order after about 35 minutes and normal lessons were held in the afternoon.


Report called for
   Mr Dare estimated last night that only 50 pupils were directly involved. He thought that no more than a dozen children were responsible for causing damage. Mr Joslyn Owen, Devon's Director of Education, has called for a full report on the disturbance. Bideford school is divided into two complexes. Yesterday's disturbance seems to have stemmed from anger and boredom from children excluded from one part of the building

BROAD-
SHEET
Objective reporting
Traditionally they are a bigger size, but ‘compact’ versions are now more common
They focus on ‘hard’ news, both national and international. They are concerned with politics and finance
Use more formal language.
Formal language
size is smaller
politics
International news
more writing
compact
less pictures
We know the name
newspaper address
More serious
more information
get people thinking
formal posh language
harder vocabulary
Features
Language features
WHICH WORDS HELP TO SHOW HOW SCARY THE ORDEAL WAS?
HOW DOES THE WRITER SHOW HOW RELUCTANT THE FOOTBALLERS WERE TO PULL OUT?

Who?
Where?
Why?
What?
How?

5 Questions for Report Writing

What ideas did you have for your own headline?
Can you see any other puns in this article?

Matching Up!

You have each been given the opening paragraphs from 5 different newspaper articles and 4 matching headlines.

Can you match up the headline to the article?
Was it easy? Why?

For each article, write down the techniques which have been used by the headline writer.

For the missing headline, read the paragraph carefully and try to think of your own effective headline.

Golden Rules

A good headline:
Summarises the story in as few words as possible
Leaves out unnecessary words like ‘a’ or ‘the’
Is often written in the present tense
Often uses emotive or dramatic language
Sometimes uses a play on words or pun
Sometimes uses alliteration





How should a newspaper article be written?

Write for 60 seconds, noting down everything you can about the structure and language used in a newspaper article.

Can you answer this question?

OOPS SHE DID IT AGAIN!


Language: Simple or complex words used?
Can you find any examples of everyday language in the article?
Any examples of shocking words / emotive language?
What tense is the article written in?

Tone: Is the article funny? Serious? Angry? Shocking?
Is the article formal or informal?

Bias: Do you feel sympathy or anger towards Britney? Why?

Interviews: Journalists will often use quotes from eyewitnesses and specialists.
Who has commented in this article?
Can we trust what they say?

Use of facts: What facts are given?




Is it a tabloid or a broadsheet?
How do you know?
Think of many reasons as you can to prove you are right.


Britney Spears!

How many of these newspaper front page features have you heard of?

Be honest. Tick them on your sheets and be prepared to explain what they are…

Head line
Sub-heading
Lead story
Picture
Name of paper
Banner
By-line
Caption
2nd and 3rd story
Advertisement
Contents/information boxes
Date and price

The Front Page

PUNS:

A pun is the use of two words with different meanings but similar sounds to create a humorous effect. Why do headline writers use puns?

Can you recognise the puns in these headlines? Try to explain them to your partner.

Which technique?

KATE’S MOSSTERY MAN

GORD HELP US NOW!

CELEBRITY BIG BLUBBER!

You have been given these images from tomorrow’s main stories.
Choose one to focus on.
Can you create a headline and opening paragraph using the 5 w’s?

Headline News

What is a headline? What makes a good headline?
Look at these examples of effective headlines. Can you think of three rules you should follow to write a good headline?

Learning Outcomes:

Headlines created using effective techniques.
Opening paragraphs written.

To explore how newspaper headlines are written.
To think about how to write a catchy opening paragraph with powerful words.

Learning Objectives:

How can you tell which is tabloid and which is broadsheet? How?
Give as many reasons as you can.
Use your mind maps to help you to compare the two articles.


SCHOOLKIDS RUN RIOT OVER LUNCH

CHILDREN ran riot through a town yesterday after being locked out of their school by work-to-rule teachers. About 300 pupils roamed the streets smashing windows and terrifying families. Police were called to quell the lunchtime rumpus - the second day running there had been trouble at the 1780-pupil Bideford Comprehensive School in Devon. Headmaster John Dare said later his staff were working to rule in support of the pay claim by the National Union of Teachers.    Teachers have banned voluntary supervision and there were only three on duty to control pupils during breaks.

Angry

   Mr Dare - who said he was "saddened" by the incident - will be making a full report to the Devon Education Authority.    A spokesman for the authority said: "We have yet to establish the extent of the damage caused."


Tabloid or Broadsheet?

Look carefully at the newspaper you have been given.
Think about the following:

Choice of stories:
What kind of stories does it contain? Local? Celebrity? Politics?
What is the lead (main) story?
What can you tell about the different audiences of the paper from this?

Appearance:
Is the cost clearly displayed? Why / why not?
What kind of colours are used on the front page? Are there any adverts? If so, what for?
Are there many pictures or is there more writing?
Who do you think the audience is? Why has it been written (purpose)?


Newspapers

There are lots of different newspapers available.
Can you think of three different types?
In what ways are they different?

Newspapers

Learning Outcome:

To produce notes on the three different kinds of newspapers using a mind map.

To understand the difference between fiction and non-fiction.
To recognise the differences between tabloid, broadsheet and local newspapers.

Learning Objectives:
PSYCHOTIC BRIT IS AT ROCK BOTTOM!

“WRITHING”

“STAND-OFF”


Circle all of the words and phrases which you think create a negative impression of Britney.

Is Britney Spears presented positively or negatively in this article?

Using powerful words

Learning Outcome:

Annotated articles from The Sun.

To learn how writers can use language to influence our opinions

Learning Objectives:

How are they different?

Newspapers

: formal; factual; complex words; focus on politics and world news; longer sentences; aimed at professional people; less images; more text.

Tabloid: shorter sentences; emotional stories; focus on celebrity news; aimed at working class people; more images; less text; easier words.

Local: Focus on local news; short summaries of world news; local adverts; obituaries; balance of images and text; straight forward language and sentence structure.



Local

Broadsheet

There are lots of others – can you think of any?
What are the similarities that make them all non-fiction?

Colour in all of the examples of non-fiction on your worksheets.

biography
travel writing
text books
Here are a few kinds of non-fiction text:
What is non-fiction?

OOPS SHE DID IT AGAIN!


Opening sentences are designed to grab the reader’s attention. What is it about the first paragraph that makes the reader want to read on?
In pairs see if you can you identify how the 5 questions have been answered in this opening.
Who?
What?
When?
Where?
Why?
Fill in your pyramid with the 5 w’s from the article.




Newspaper layout from Empower 1

6

11

7

10

9

4

3

2

5

8

12

1

Tabloid
Broadsheet
formal; factual; complex words; focus on politics and world news; longer sentences; aimed at professional people; less images; more text.

Tabloid:
formal text but lighthearted
big bold fonts
snappy headlines and subheadings
subjective language - emotional language
biased
we can see the name - daily mirror
highlight parts of the queen's speech
like a story - lighthearted
lots of pictures
gossipy
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
THE 5 Ws

PUPILS GO ON RAMPAGE
By COLIN RANDALL

POLICE were called to a
comprehensive
school in Devon yesterday to
quell
a
disturbance
involving at least 60 pupils. Officers went to the 1700-pupil mixed school in Bideford after nearby
residents reported a "developing riot."
 The trouble, described by
Devon County Council as "a disturbance rather than a riot,"

occurred
at lunchtime when only
Mr John Dare, the headmaster, and two members of staff
were available to supervise pupils because of the teachers' pay dispute. Several windows were smashed by children throwing bottles and stones. Police restored order after about 35 minutes and normal lessons were held in the afternoon.


Report called for
   
Mr Dare estimated last night that only 50 pupils were directly involved
. He thought that no more than a dozen children were responsible for causing damage.
Mr Joslyn Owen, Devon's Director of Education, has called for a full report on the disturbance.
Bideford school is divided into two
complexes
. Yesterday's disturbance seems to have
stemmed
from anger and boredom from children excluded from one part of the building


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SCHOOLKIDS
RUN RIOT
OVER LUNCH

CHILDREN ran riot through a town yesterday after being locked out of their school by work-to-rule teachers. About 300 pupils roamed the streets smashing windows and t
errifying families
. Police were called to quell the lunchtime rumpus - the second day running there had been trouble at the 1780-pupil Bideford Comprehensive School in Devon. H
eadmaster John Dare said later his staff were working to rule in support of the pay claim by the National Union of Teachers
. Teachers have banned voluntary supervision and there were only three on duty to control pupils during breaks.

Angry

   Mr Dare - who said he was "saddened" by the incident - will be making a full report to the Devon Education Authority. 
A spokesman for the authority said: "We have yet to establish the extent of the damage caused."
Full transcript