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The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

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Eleni Koliviras

on 17 December 2013

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Transcript of The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
Modernism and T. S. Eliot
Explication
Themes and Devices
If you enjoyed this poem...
The Poem
T.S. Eliot
Voice

Tone

Perspective
Imagery

Symbols

Metaphor

Sound and Meter
Form
Simile

Personification

Allusion
Character

Setting

Plot
"Modernists" essentially included artists and writers (during the late 19th to mid 20th century) who witnessed the vast changes that brought the world from traditional to modern.
It is in their work that they tried to make sense of this rapid change that none of them really understood.
Fear, war, boredom, and cities are a few classic modernist themes.
T.S. Eliot was born in America and moved to Britain in 1914.
He began writing "Prufrock" when he was only 22 years old.
"Prufrock" went on to be published in
Poetry
magazine in 1915 with the help of Ezra Pound and in the book
Prufrock and Other Observations
in 1917.
Eliot then went on to publish what is considered to be some of the most important poems of the 20th century, such as "The Wasteland"
He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1948.
J. Alfred Prufrock
A city that
may
be London
Love

Passivity

Manipulation

Appearance

Time
Check out other works by Eliot!
"The Waste Land"
"The Hollow Men"
"Ash Wednesday"
"Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats"
"Four Quartets"
Dramatic monologue
Three characteristics:
it is the utterances of an individual who is
not
the poet,
it is directed toward a listener whose presence is suggested, but not specifically referenced,
and the focus is the development and revelation of the character.
A skinny, bald man taking a walk around a city, speaking in nursery rhymes, having tea, and wishing he were a crab...
This poem's rhyme scheme is assuredly irregular, but far from random.
It is a meticulously structured amalgamation of poetic forms.
The most prominent of which is the use of refrains.
Another would be the use of fragments of sonnet form, exemplified at the end of the poem.
The rhyme of the three three-line stanzas are reflective of the conclusion of a Petrarchan sonnet (with a modern meaning).
The Basics
Full transcript