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Who Would Win in a Fight?

Percy Jackson vs. Beowulf
by

Carrie Wallingford

on 18 March 2014

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Transcript of Who Would Win in a Fight?

Beowulf, like most epic heroes, is of noble birth. In the story of Beowulf, he is referred to as "Higlac's follower," and according to a sidenote on page 36, Higlac's follower is a "warrior loyal to Higlac, king of the Geats (and Beowulf's uncle)." Beowulf is also referred to as a young prince (36).
Comparison: Lineage
Both heroes have traveled far and wide to accomplish their deeds. One, however, has a much more impressive travel record.
Contrast: Landscape
Comparison: The Universal Theme
Both heroes faced formidable foes and determined the fate of many people, but the actions of one were of a much larger magnitude than the other.
Contrast: Fate
During his fight with Grendel, Beowulf performed feats of superhuman strength when he alone held back the monster who could carry away 30 men at once ("Beowulf" 41), and then he ripped the monster's arm off without the aid of any weapon (" Beowulf" 43).
Comparison: Supernatural Feats
Both have had encounters with supernatural creatures, but one such encounter sets the heroes apart.
Contrast: Supernatural Encounters
Comparison: Timeless Values
Each hero reflects the values of his own time. Their times differ greatly, so their values do the same.
Contrast: "Modern" Values
Conclusion
After a hard match and a lot of comparing and contrasting, Percy Jackson has come out on top, overshadowing Beowulf's noble deeds with countless acts of selflessness and courage.
Round 1
Round 2
Round 3
Final Evaluation
Bibliographies
“Beowulf.” Trans. Burton Raffel. The Language of Literature: British Literature. Ed. Arthur N. Applebee, et. al. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2002. 32-60. Print.
"Beowulf, Act I: Beowulf Vs. Grendel." Read 57.1 (2007): 24. MasterFILE Premier. Web. 4 Mar. 2014.
Riordan, Rick.
The Battle of the Labyrinth
. New York: Scolastic Inc., 2008. Print.
Riordan, Rick.
The House of Hades
. New York: Disney~Hyperion Books, 2013. Print.
Riordan, Rick.
The Lightning Thief
. New York: Scolastic Inc., 2005. Print.
Riordan, Rick.
The Mark of Athena
. New York: Disney~Hyperion Books, 2012. Print.
Riordan, Rick.
The Sea of Monsters
. New York: Scolastic Inc.,2006. Print.
Riordan, Rick.
The Son of Neptune
. New York: Disney~Hyperion Books, 2011. Print.
Riordan, Rick.
The Titan's Curse
. New York: Scolastic Inc., 2007. Print.

Like Beowulf, Percy Jackson is of noble birth, but Percy is on another level entirely. Although his mother is an average mortal, his father is Poseidon, Greek god of the sea. Percy's identity is revealed to him in
The Lightning Thief
during a game of capture the flag when the shape of a trident glows above his head (126).
The story of Beowulf reflects the universal theme of "good vs. evil." In his story, Beowulf defeats the monster Grendel, a descendent of Cain whose children were "banished by God, punished forever for the crime of Abel's death (34). Beowulf also destroyed Grendel's mother after she vengefully attacked the Danes ("Beowulf" 49).
Percy Jackson also reflects this theme. Percy and his friends' main goal is to defeat Gaea (Mother Earth, very evil) before she awakes and destroys the world (
The Son of Neptune
63).
Though both have noble blood running through their veins, Percy Jackson clearly has the upper hand, being the direct descendent of a god and all.
Who Would Win in a Fight?
vs.
Beowulf
Percy Jackson
The hero Beowulf sailed "over the sea to the land of the Danes [otherwise known as Denmark] to offer help to Hrothgar (36)."
Percy Jackson's journey began in Long Island, New York, and within his first book he and his two friends traveled 3000 miles to Los Angeles (
The Lightning Thief
147). In
The Son of Neptune
winds up in San Francisco (4). From there he and his friends fly to Rome, he falls into Tartarus with his girlfriend Annabeth (
Mark of Athena
568), make it out of there, and upon surviving that, make plans to continue their journey to Greece to face their biggest opponent yet (
House of Hades
581). And that's not even all of it.
Round 1 goes to Percy Jackson!
In Beowulf's battles with Grendel and his Mother, he saved the lives of many Danish men and women, and he avenged the lives of those that had already been killed ("Beowulf" 43, 49). Fifty years later, Beowulf and his loyal subject Wiglaf defeated a dragon that was disturbed and began to attack Beowulf's people. Their act saved many lives in the kingdom, but cost Beowulf his own ("Beowulf" 59) .
Today's match is one of EPIC proportions. Modern teenage demigod, Percy Jackson versus Beowulf, the mightiest of the Geats and hero of the Danes. Based upon their previous adventures, let's see Who Would Win in a Fight.
Brief
Percy Jackson and his friends must fight the army of the goddess Gaea (earth) and prevent her from waking and destroying the world. Thwarting Gaea's plans would save every person on the planet because Gaea basically is the planet (
Son of Neptune
64).
Beowulf takes Round 2 because, technically, Percy and friends haven't defeated Gaea yet.
Percy Jackson has no superhuman strength, but being the son of the sea god has its perks. Percy has the ability to control water with his mind (
The Lightning Thief
91). He can also be healed by water (
The Lightning Thief
126) and talk to pegasi (
The Titan's Curse
109).
Super strength is pretty cool, but that's nothing compared to the power Percy has over water, and his ability to talk to Poseidon's favorite animals.
Both of Beowulf's encounters with the supernatural lead to the ultimate destruction of the monsters ("Beowulf" 49).
Though Percy typically sends monsters back to Tartarus with a few swipes of his sword, there are a few creatures who have received quite the opposite treatment. Among them are Percy's best friend Grover, a satyr and his protector (
The Lightning Thief
43), and a talking pink poodle whom they befriend and get information from (
The Lightning Thief
195).
AAAAAND PERCY TAKES ROUND 3!!! Not only are Percy Jackson's abilities more useful than Beowulf's, he also doesn't attack just anyone, which is an admirable quality to have.
Beowulf exhibits timeless values in his tale. While delivering his boastful speech he states, "I have heard, too, that the monster's scorn of men is so great that he needs no weapons and fears none. Nor will I ("Beowulf 39)". Beowulf also shows insane bravery when he jumps into a murky lake full of viscious monsters to find and kill Grendel's "she-wolf" mother ("Beowulf" 47).
Percy also reflects some timeless values during his adventures. He shows courage when he takes on his half brother who had defeated numerous monsters before him with only his sword for a weapon (
The Battle of the Labyrinth
260). He also practices self-sacrifice in
The Titan's Curse
when he chooses to free Annabeth from the curse of holding up the sky by taking the burden from her--literally (
The Titan's Curse
268).
Beowulf reflects the importance of pride during his time when he gives a soliloquy about all of his great victories ("Beowulf" 38). He also shows pride in another manuscript by his words: "Your prophets all promise me success. I can feel that victory is in the air--yes, I can taste its very sweetness ("Beowulf, Act 1...")." This shows his pride because he has not even seen the monster to know of its size or ferocity.
Percy reflects his era's value of intelligence and knowledge of history when he bests the cyclops Polyphemus using the same confusing dialogue as Odysseus had before him (
The Sea of Monsters
211).
Percy's cause is noble enough, but to be quite honest, Beowulf has a significantly greater chance of destroying a few monsters than Percy has of defeating the earth.
http://www.percyjacksonbooks.com/
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