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Denmark Vesey-Richard Furman

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Jacob Waldrip

on 17 November 2014

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Transcript of Denmark Vesey-Richard Furman

Denmark Vesey-Richard Furman
Social and Religious Institutions,
Religious Action,
and Legacy

“Our inherited predispositions influence our environment, which influences our inherited predispositions, in a never-ending spiral that produces a unique individual with specific interests, capabilities, limits, and ways of responding to events.”
Richard Furman
How was Richard Furman's life shaped by inherited predispositions, institutions, and social norms to place him in a position of power in religion?
Conversion and Call
-Separates and Regulars
Denmark Vesey
How was Denmark Vesey’s life shaped by institutions and social norms to place him in a position of power in religion?
Thesis
Either by submitting to or subverting social and religious institutions, human religious action and legacy are shaped by those institutions.
Method
Look at a few instances from the lives of Furman and Vesey
Examine the revolt
Examine the reaction
Explore the legacies
Patriot Cause
First Provincial Congress
Baptist Leadership
-Associational
Developmental Psychology
Born October 9, 1755 in Esopus, NY.
Moved to SC in 1755, the High Hills in 1770
-Joseph Reese
-Ordination
What is the significance of this conversion and call to ministry?
Preaching Tour
Letter
Significance?
-National
-State
D.O.B is uncertain
Named "Telemaque" by
Joseph Vesey
St. Thomas
-Introduction to social
stratification
-Joseph Vesey
-The first voyage
Saint Domingue
-Brilliant plan
-subversive nature and bravery
-The second voyage
Charleston
and Freedom
Lottery
Three-caste stratification
The A.M.E. Church
Inherited
Predispositions
His predispositions
The Revolt and
the Reaction
The Plan
The Betrayal
The Result
Denmark Vesey's Sentence
"It is difficult to imagine what infatuation could have prompted you to attempt an enterprise so wild and visionary. You were a free man; you were comparatively wealthy; and enjoyed every comfort compatible with your situation. You had, therefore, much to risk, and little to gain. From your age and experience, you ought to have known that success was impractible."
Richard Furman's Response
When I had, lately, the honour of delivering to your Excellency an Address, from the Baptist Convention in this State, requesting that Day of Public Humiliation and Thanksgiving may be appointed by you . . . in reference to two important recent events, in which the interposition of Divine Providence has been conspicuous . . . The protections afforded them from the horrors of an intended Insurrection . . . I had a further communication to make on behalf of the Convention, in which their sentiments would be disclosed . . . on the lawfulness of holding slaves.
What is Denmark Vesey's
religious legacy?
What is Richard Furman's?
Final

Conclusions
The...


"Why This?" Question

"Thus it is to maintain the happy state of the constitution, that America has opposed Parliament; and in so doing had not rejected the King’s lawful authority. For what the King does, contrary to the constitution, is not the power, that is of God, spoken of in Scripture, and therefore ought not to be obeyed."
"The child witnessed cruelty and torture unequalled even in St. Thomas. Owners routinely branded their human property, and it would not be surprising to discover that the boy carried such an imprint throughout his long life. Equally common was the brutal practice of smearing salt, ash, or lemon into a beaten slave’s open wounds..."
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