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Problems with the Articles of Confederation

Use the illustrations to identify the problems that existed with the Articles of Confederation.
by

Jeff Wiseman

on 26 September 2011

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Transcript of Problems with the Articles of Confederation

Problems with
THE ARTICLES
OF
CONFEDERATION A One feature of the Articles of Confederation was that the government had no chief executive, such as a president or a king. As a result, the government under the Articles suffered from a lack of leadership since there was no single leader. Instructions

To move from image to image in today's Gallery Walk, you can:
--Click the "Play" button at the bottom of the screen
--Use the Left/Right arrows on your keyboard to move forward/backward
--Use Up/Down arrows to Zoom In/Out

***You can also use your mouse to explore the entire area.

As you visit each illustration, use the image and its caption/ information to help you fill in and complete your handout/ chart. B Illustration B:
One feature of the Articles of Confederation was that new laws needed to be approved by nine of the thirteen states. This was included in the Articles because the delegates to the Continental Congress wanted to protect the rights of states and did not want the central government to become too powerful. With this feature, new laws would have to be agreeable to nine of the states instead of a simple majority of seven.
Illustration C:
One feature of the Articles of Confederation was that Congress did not have the power to tax its citizens directly; instead, it could only request money from the states. This created financial problems because states often did not pay what was requested of them from the federal government. C D Illustration D:
One feature of the Articles of Confederation was that Congress did not have the power to draft men into the Continental Army; instead, it could only request states to send men into military service. The delegates to the Continental Congress were fearful that a federal government with a powerful army might take away the rights of citizens, as the British army had done to them.
E Illustration E:
One feature of the Articles of Confederation was that there was no national court system. Instead, each state had its own court system. Disputes between states had to be settled in one of the states’ courts. The delegates to the Continental Congress provided for no national court system because they believed that a national court may be unfair to the rights of the states.
F Illustration F:
One feature of the Articles of Confederation was that any amendments, or changes, to the Articles required the approval of all 13 states. This made changes to the Articles nearly impossible—any single state could prevent a change that the rest of the nation wanted.
C G Illustration G:
One feature of the Articles of Confederation was that Congress did not have the power to collect state debts (money owed) to the federal government. The delegates to the Continental Congress wanted to ensure that the federal government could not force states to pay for things that states did not want. H Illustration H:
One feature of the Articles of Confederation was that Congress did not have the power to settle disputes among states. The Articles guaranteed that each state would keep its individual power, freedom, and independence. As a result, Congress did not have the power to help states work out conflicts among them, and states became increasingly disunited.
Congratulations! You've explored some of the biggest problems that existed in the Articles of Confederation!

Remember: Don't get attached to the Articles. They're going to disappear and be replaced in just a few years.
But before we lose the Articles, let's take a look at what might have gone wrong.

Go back to Mr. Wiseman's class website (https://wiki.friscoisd.org/users/wisemanj/) and answer the two Final Questions that are posted there. You will answer by making a Comment on today's blog entry. Follow the instructions when you get there for success.

(Push the "Esc" button to exit this presentation.)
Full transcript