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Michael Plessala Prezi Report (Done)

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on 9 May 2013

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Transcript of Michael Plessala Prezi Report (Done)

The Salem Witch Trials! When Were They? They were were a
series of hearings
and prosecutions of people
accused of being witches
in Massachusetts. What Were the Salem Witch Trials? They happened during
February 1692 to
May 1693. What Happened? When colonists accused one of their neighbors of being a witch, they are immediately tried, convicted, and brought to Gallows Hill, a barren slope near Salem Village, Massachusetts, for hanging. A True Story :( Young Betty Parris became strangely ill. She dashed about, dove under furniture, contorted in pain, and complained of fever. She may have suffered from some combination of stress, asthma, guilt, boredom, child abuse, and epilepsy. Sadly, some people just thought she was possessed and a witch. It was easy to believe in 1692 that the devil was close at hand.
Talk of witchcraft increased when other playmates of Betty, including eleven-year-old Ann Putnam, seventeen-year-old Mercy Lewis, Mary Walcott, and Abigail Williams, began to show similar symptoms.

Continued on next frame... Continued... By Michael Plessala Works Cited http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salem_witch_trials http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/brief-salem.html http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/
salem/SAL_ACCT.HTM Meanwhile, the number of girls afflicted
continued to grow, rising to seven with the
addition of Ann Putnam, Elizabeth Hubbard,
Susannah Sheldon, and Mary Warren. The girls were tried for witchcraft, convicted, and hanged. THE END
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