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GLSEN - Making it Better: Effective Responses to Anti-LGBT Bullying and Bias in Our Schools

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Tim Pappalardo

on 8 March 2011

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Transcript of GLSEN - Making it Better: Effective Responses to Anti-LGBT Bullying and Bias in Our Schools

1Source: From Teasing to Torment: School Climate in America (2005); 2Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010) Middle and high school students report that sexual orientation and gender expression are among the top three reasons students in their schools are bullied or harassed.1

LGBT students are more likely to be bullied and harassed than other students (90% vs. 62% of non-LGBT students harassed/assaulted in past year). 1

The majority of LGBT students are bullied or harassed at school: 84.6% were verbally harassed; 40.1% were physically harassed (pushed, shoved); 18.8% were physical assaulted (hit, kicked, injured with weapon). 2 Experiences of Harassment & Assault Students who experienced high levels of harassment and assault had poorer educational outcomes.
Victimization Psychological
well-being Educational Aspirations Academic
Achievement Missing
School Making It Better: Effective Responses to Anti-LGBT Bullying and Bias in Our Schools Eliza Byard, Ph.D., Executive Director, GLSEN Students who experienced high levels of victimization were more likely not to plan on post-secondary education (14% vs. 9%).
Students who experienced high levels of victimization had greater depression and anxiety and lower self-esteem. Students were 3 times likelier to have missed school in the past month if they had experienced high levels of victimization (58% vs. 18%). Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Effects of Hostile School Climate
Negative school
experiences (homophobic remarks, feeling unsafe, victimization) Having a Gay-Straight Alliance, LGBT-inclusive curriculum, supportive educators, and comprehensive harassment/ assault policies were related to:
LGBT-Related Resources & Supports School staff intervention in name-calling, bullying and harassment Positive educational outcomes (less absenteeism, higher educational aspirations, academic achievement) Most schools do not have the resources and supports that create safer environments for LGBT students. LGBT-Related Resouces & Supports Staff Development Staff training specifically about anti-LGBT bullying/ harassment can improve educators’ ability to effectively respond to bullying/harassment and create safer school environments for LGBT students. Source: Year One Evaluation of the NYC Department of Education Respect for All Training Program (2010) Staff Development Few public school principals report that staff training on bullying/harassment includes content addressing bullying/harassment related to students’ sexual orientation (30%) or gender identity/expression (24%). From Teasing to Torment: School Climate in America (2005 ); The Principal’s Perspective: School Safety, Bullying and Harassment: A Survey of Public School Principals (2008) From Teasing to Torment: School Climate in America (2005 ); The Principal’s Perspective: School Safety, Bullying and Harassment: A Survey of Public School Principals (2008) Most secondary school teachers (86%) and K-12 principals (69%) believe that professional development on dealing with anti-LGBT bullying/harassment would help to create safer schools. Staff Development www.glsen.org Bullying: Essential Context GLSEN envisions a world in which
every child learns to accept and respect all people, regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity/expression. GLSEN's Vision: As the only national organization whose mission focuses on issues of sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression in K-12 schools, we have a crucial contribution to make to improving school climate. The Role of Faculty and Staff The majority (62.4%) of LGBT students never reported incidents of harassment or assault to school staff.
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Most common reason for not reporting to school staff:
Doubted that staff would effectively address situation
(39.6%).
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Most common response by school staff when students did report: Nothing (33.8%). Nearly a quarter (22%) of children with LGBT parents said that a school staff person had discouraged them from talking about their family at school. Source: Involved, Invisible, Ignored: The Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Parents and Their Children in Our Nation’s K-12 Schools (2008)
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010) At GLSEN, we know that when any one child or group of children in a school are harassed - for any reason - all of the children experience their school as unsafe. We are committed to making schools safe and welcoming for ALL students:
Victims
Bystanders
Bullies Oklahomans for Equality (OKEQ) Some of GLSEN's Partners Students who experienced high levels of victimization had GPAs almost half a grade lower than (2.7 vs. 3.1). Less than half (45%) of LGBT students said that their school had a GSA or similar student club. Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
Inclusive Curriculum 1 in 7 LGBT students (13%) were taught positive representations about LGBT people, history, or events. Almost all students (95%) could identify at least one school staff member supportive of LGBT Students. Supportive Educators (6 or more) Comprehensive Policies Less than 1 in 5 (18%) reported that their school had a comprehensive policy that specifically included sexual orientation, gender identity, and/or gender expression. Only about half (53%) could identify six or more. Nearly 40% of LGBT students heard teachers or other school staff use biased anti-LGBT language. More than 80% of LGBT students report that school faculty or staff who witness anti-LGBT name-calling rarely or never intervene. Source: The 2009 National School Climate Survey (2010)
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