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Commonly Confused Words

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by

Michael Coyle

on 23 September 2016

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Transcript of Commonly Confused Words

THEN
(adverb)

Then deals with time. It means either at a certain time, or signals the discussion of a later time.

I resided in Hawaii
then
.

I devoured the Big Mac and
then
I felt sick.
Than (conjunction and preposition)


"
Than
" is all about comparing things. "Than" introduces the second element in a comparison, or an exception or contrast.


The
Lakers
have won more titles
than
the Clippers.

He would like to do anything rather
than
go to the dentist.
Then

and

Than

There, Their and They're
There

is an adverb that deals with position or location.

My house is over
there
.
There
is the scoundrel who absconded with my money!

Their
is a possessive pronoun (like its) that shows ownership or association.

Their
car was bumping old school jams.
The Garcias were not at
their
residence
.

They're
is just a conjunction for "they are". So it means are group of people are doing something.
After school, they're planning to go to Denny's

To

and

Too
Its

and

It's

It's
is a contraction meaning "it is".

Its
is a possessive pronoun that shows ownership or association with something previously mentioned.


It's
a stupendous day = It is a stupendous day.

The dog walked to
its
owner.

The confusion arises because apostrophes create possesives with most nouns. For example, "This is Mr.
Coyle's
class."
Its
, however, needs no apostrophe because
it's
possessive all by itself.


Better Living Through Clear Communication
Commonly Confused Words
This dog doesn't get IT!
To
indicates motion, or identifies the noun being affected.

Too
means also or excessively (as in There is
too
much violence in the world.


Jose misses
too
many days of school.
I want
to
go
to
Tahiti,
too!

Whose
and
Who's

Whose
is a pronoun that questions ownership.
Whose
car is the one with the sweet chrome rims?
Jane is the girl
whose
grades are incomprable.

Who's
is a contraction that means who is.
Who's
going to the Skrillex concert with me (ostensibly to boo, of course)?
Past
and
Passed
Past
(noun) means gone by in time and no longer existing.
Forget about yesterday, it's in the past!
Past
(verb) can also mean on the other side of something.
"Drive past all these slow fools!" said Marcus.


Passed
(verb) means you went beyond something else.
Jimbo
passed
his ex girlfriend's house on the way to the protest.
Passed
(verb) can also mean something's been moved.
Lionel Messi
passed
the ball to Neymar.
Cause
and
Because
Cause
(verb) means to make something happen.
That pyromaniac is going to
cause
a dangerous fire!
Cause
(noun) is the reason something happens.
The
cause
of your poor grades is that you don't read anything more complex than the side of a cereal box.
Because
is a conjunction that explains a reason for doing something. It's similar to the word "since".
Martin gets bad grades
because
he fails to recognize the value of reading to supplement his imagination.
Loose
and
Lose

Loose
(adjective) is the opposite of tight.
My pants are too
loose
; everybody's going to see my butt!

Lose
(verb) is the opposite of win.
Vince will
lose
the game of life because he does not enrich his mind with literature.
Don't end up like this fool!
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