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ART TELLS A STORY

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Carla Paynter

on 29 April 2014

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Transcript of ART TELLS A STORY

ART TELLS
A STORY

Year long art curriculum for middle school
6-8th grade,
(adaptable for 9-12th grade)


This Art program will encourage and engage students to think about how to develop meaning and story within their artwork. This program will give students tools, techniques, and strategies which they can use to create interesting and meaningful artworks, and feel successful explaining their ideas visually.

Philosophy Statement/ Curriculum Rationale
This course will encourage students to be independent researchers when looking for content, subject matter, and inspiration for their artwork.

This course will promote learning about past and present art historical influences.

This course will foster the use of a wide variety of materials to convey different ideas and perspectives.

Full -Year Curriculum Content Map
Unit 1: Character Development Frameworks Addressed
1.
Methods, Materials, and Techniques
. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

2.
Elements and Principles of Design
. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

3.
Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression
. Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

4.
Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting
. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

8.
Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change.
Students will demonstrate their understanding of styles, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created, and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Lesson 1: Story Board an Adventure
Art Tells
a Story
Lesson 1:
News Brief
Collage
UNIT 2:
Places
and Spaces
UNIT 1:
Character
Development
UNIT 3:
Working
from History
Lesson 2:
The Color
Movement
Lesson 3:
Combine two
Painting
Lesson 3:
Atmospheric
Terrain
Collage
Lesson 3:
Clay Face
Jugs
Lesson 1:
Buildings,
A two-point
Perspective
Lesson 2:
Pop-up
City
Lesson 1:
Story Boarding
an Adventure
Lesson 2:
Express
your face
Art Tells a Story
For the year-long course:

Enduring Understandings
: Artwork tells a story. Artists use different tools, techniques and strategies to help them explain their ideas visually. Artists use a variety of references to inform their artwork.

Essential Questions
: How do artists tell stories through their work? What tools, techniques and strategies do artists use to help them tell their visual stories?
Unit 1: Character Development
Enduring Understandings
: Artists often develop characters in order to tell their stories. A character contains many elements, (mood, expression, and movement) and each element can convey different ideas in artwork.

Essential Questions
: Why do expression, mood and movement matter when developing a visual character? How do artists use these elements to enhance their visual storytelling?

Unit Objectives
: To encourage creative methods for developing characters in artwork.
To promote the importance of character development in art making and artworks.
Unit 1: Character Development
Lesson Map
Time line
: approx. 4 months for entire unit
Lesson 2: Express your face
Artists
: Alice Neel, Frida Kahlo,
Marlene Dumas,
fauvists
Materials
: oil pastel, pencil, paper
Lesson 1:
Story Boarding
an Adventure
Lesson 2:
Express
your face
Lesson 3:
Portrait
Toby Jug
Benchmark products
Unit 1: Character Development
Assessment
Lesson 3: Clay Face Jugs

Materials
: clay, acrylic paint

Benchmark
product
Unit 2: Places and Spaces
Enduring Understandings
: Artists often develop places and spaces in order to tell their stories. A place and space can be described in many visual ways (time of day, weather, distance, perspective).

Essential Questions
: What are ways you can visually describe your place or space? How do artists use these decriptors to enhance their visual storytelling?

Unit Objectives
: To encourage creative methods for developing place and space in artwork.
To promote the importance of place and space development in art making and artworks.
Unit 3: Working from History
Enduring Understandings
: Artists use many different types of references in their artwork. History past or present informs the art-making process.

Essential Questions
: Why would artists choose to reference an artwork or event from the past or present? How can artists incorporate history into their artwork?

Unit Objectives
: To encourage creative methods for using references.
To promote the importance of using many references in art making and artworks.
Unit 2: Places and Spaces
Lesson Map
Time line
: approx. 4 months for entire unit
Lesson 1:
Buildings, a
two-point
perspective
Lesson 2:
City of paper
pop-ups
Lesson 3:
Atmospheric
Terrain
collage
Unit 3: Working from History
Lesson Map
Time line
: approx. 4 months for entire unit
Lesson 1:
New Brief
Collage
Lesson 2:
The Color
Movement
Lesson 3:
Combine two
Paintings
Unit 2: Places and Spaces Frameworks Addressed
1. Methods, Materials, and Techniques
. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

3. Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression.
Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

7. Roles of Artists in Communities
. Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present

9. Inventions, Technologies and the Arts
. Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their work.

10. Interdisciplinary Connections.
Students will apply their knowledge of the arts to the study of English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social sciences, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Unit 3: Working from History Frameworks Addressed
1. Methods, Materials, and Techniques.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

2. Elements and Principles of Design.
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

5. Critical Response.
Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

6. Purposes of the Arts.
Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theater, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, when appropriate, interpret their meanings.

8. Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change.
Students will demonstrate their understanding of styles, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created, and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Lesson 1: Buildings, a two-point perspective
Lesson 1: News Brief Collage
Artists
: Nancy Chunn, Ellsworth Kelly sketchbook, Frida Kahlo sketchbook.

Materials
: Newspaper, paper, oil pastel, chalk pastel, sharpies, colored pencil.
Benchmark
product
:
Lesson 1: Buildings, a two-point perspective
Artists
: Giotto, other Renaissance artists,
architectural drawing

Materials
: pencil, sharpie, colored pencil, paper
Benchmark product
:
Lesson 2: The Color Movement
Lesson 2: Pop-up City
Lesson 2: The Color Movement
Benchmark
product
:
Lesson 2: Pop-up City
Benchmark
product
:
Lesson 3: Combine two paintings,
Subject matter and style
Artists
: Rococo and Bauhaus, Romantic and Cubism
Materials
: acrylic paint, canvas

Differentiation Plan
Standards-based
Scope and Sequence Chart
Art Spiegelman,
Maus
(page from book)
http://collider.com/maus-movie-adaptation/

Lesson 1: Character Development
Benchmark product
Lesson 2: Express your face
Artists
: Joe Sacco, Gary Larson,
Art Spiegelman, Joyce Farmer, Alison Bechdel

Materials
: illustration board,
pencil, pen, ink.

Essential Questions
:
What is a graphic novel
and comic book?
Why are they called that?
What purpose do these
books serve?
How are they different
from other books?
Joyce Farmer,
Special Exits
http://comicsforum.org/2011/09/19/graphic-medicine-4-hospice-comics-by-mk-czerwiec-comic-nurse/
Essential Questions
:
How can expression tell us
about the mood of the character?
How can color tells us
about the mood of the character?
Which parts of the face are most
expressive?

Alice Neel,
Abdul Rahman,
1964
http://www.artprojx.com/ALICENEEL.html
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=85113,
https://www.etsy.com/market/illustration_drawing/6
Essential Questions
:
How can you use form and shape to create expression and character?

http://gardendrum.com/2012/12/page/3/
http://www.chrisefstratis.com/ceramicsindex.html
Essential Questions
:
Do we see in
two-point perspective?
Why draw using the
two-point perspective
technique?
Giotto,
Exorcism of the demons at arezzo
, 1299
http://www.wikipaintings.org/en/giotto/exorcism-of-the-demons-at-arezzo-1299
http://piaart.wordpress.com/two-point-perspective/
Essential Questions
:
What elements of a city are unique and interesting to look at?
How do artists represent cities in their artwork?
Bearden,
The Block
, 1971
http://museumpublicity.com/2010/01/22/romare-bearden-exhibition-at-the-metropolitan-museum-of-art/
Haas and Hahn,
OMorro
, Favela Houses
http://hifructose.com/2010/06/14/painting-brazils-favelas/

Artists
: Romare Bearden, Faith Ringgold, Jacob Lawrence, Favela houses

Materials
: cardstock, scissors, colored pencil, oil pastel, sharpie
http://madebyjoel.com/2010/05/paper-city-vehicles.html
Lesson 2: Atmospheric Terrain
Essential Questions
:
How do artists create atmospheric/visual space?
What is the purpose of creating space in imagery, and how does it benefit the story the artwork
tells?
Unit 2: Atmospheric Terrain Assessment
http://www.patternpeople.com/art-david-hockneys-landscapes/
Artists
: David Hockney,
Chinese Landscape painters

Materials
: painted paper, glue, scissors
Benchmark Product
:
Essential Questions
:
Why would artists use the newspaper for ideas
and references?
How can a newspaper article inform a piece of
artwork?
Nancy Chunn
http://www.parkslopegallery.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=801
Drawing Center NYC, Ellsworth Kelly, Tablet 1949-73 exhibition 2002
http://theinevitabilityofprocess.blogspot.com/2011/11/ellsworth-kelly.html
Essential Questions
:
How can artwork with color
shape and form be interesting?
Why would artists use only
color, shape and form to create
an artwork?
Unit 3: Working from History
Assessment
Artists
: Ellsworth Kelly, Paul Klee, Mondrian, Joseph Albers, Hans Hoffman, Agnes Martin, Chris Johanson, Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, De Stijl,

Materials
: acrylic paint, paper, canvas
Agnes Martin,
Untitled #9
, 1999. acrylic and graphite on linen
http://www.pacegallery.com/artists/290/agnes-martin
Paul Kllee,
Static–Dynamic Gradation
, 1923
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/klee/hd_klee.htm
Essential Questions
:
How do artists combine aspects of different styles?
How do artists use other's work to make new/original artwork?
Agnolo Bronzino (Italian, 1503-1572)
http://arthistory.about.com/od/academic-art-academies/tp/The-Hierarchy-of-Genres-in-Academic-Art.htm
Fernand Leger,
Three Sisters
http://www.jacqueshachuelcollection.com/
Alice Neel
Romare Bearden
Giotto
Paul Klee
David Hockney
Sample Rubric
Criteria
Needs
Improvement
1-7 pts
Getting There
7-13pts
Good
13-19pts
Excellent
19-25pts
Craftsmanship/
Use of Materials

25 pts
Always used space to it's fullest potential.
Always worked in a neat and respectful
manner. Always helped clean-up.
Often used space to it's fullest potential.
Often worked in a neat and respectful
manner. Often helped clean-up.
Sometimes used space to it's fullest potential.
Sometimes worked in a neat and respectful
manner. Sometimes helped clean-up.
Rarely used space to it's fullest potential.
Rarely worked in a neat and respectful
manner. Rarely helped clean-up.
Met Project
Requirements

25 pts
Always tried to incorporate
new methods and techniques
into their project.
Often tried to incorporate
new methods and techniques
into their project.
Sometimes tried to incorporate
new methods and techniques
into their project.
Rarely tried to incorporate
new methods and techniques
into their project.
Creativity
(Artistic Vibe)

25 pts
Self-Management

25 pts
Always created work that is genuine.
Always created work that is interesting
Often created work that is genuine.
Often created work that is interesting.
Sometimes created work that is genuine.
Sometimes created work that is interesting.
Rarely created work that is genuine.
Rarely created work that is interesting.
Always strove for their best work.
Always managed their time well.
Participated during group discussions.
Often strove for their best work.
Often managed their time well.
Participated during group discussions.

Sometimes strove for their best work.
Sometimes managed their time well.
Rarely participated during group discussions.

Rarely strove for their best work.
Rarely managed their time well.
Rarely participated during group discussions.

For
ELL
students: -repeat modeling
- visual explanations
- Flexibility with reading or writing assignments

For
Hearing Impaired
students: - using appropriate instructional tools
- visual explanations
- stand in front of student when talking

For students on the
Autism
spectrum: - have individual and group work available
- maintain a classroom routine
- allow students to include their own interests

For students with
Attention disorder
: - incorporate movement breaks
- vary instruction strategies
- ensure for engaging lessons

For students with
Reading and writing disorders
: - provide writing support
- allow option of one- on- one oral presentation
- always give oral and written instruction
Partner prep for critique

Discuss each question with your partner, and answer the questions. Show that
both
of your answers are written down. We'll do a group critique afterwards:
1) Discuss what you think the purpose of this project was?

2) Did you like this project? Parts of the project? Why or why not?

3) What grade would you give yourself for this project. Explain.
Project Self-Reflection
1) Draw a thumbnail sketch of your work.

2) If you were able to do this project again, what would you do differently?

3) What did you learn during the course of this project? Explain.

Full transcript