Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Life and Method of Stanley McCandless

Technical Theater: Lighting
by

Alex Jereb

on 21 May 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Life and Method of Stanley McCandless

Allie Jereb Who was he? Beginnings The Method Later Life Quiz Stanley McCandless was an architect, lighting designer, and author who influenced many famous lighting designers with his teachings. Stanley Russell McCandless was born in 1897 to Doctor Charles Russell McCandless and Mary Eliza McCandless in Chicago, Illinois. The Life and Method of Stanley McCandless http://www3.northern.edu/wild/LiteDes/ldhist.htm#educators Stanley McCandless was a man with ideas about stage lighting that would change the field forever. He created a method of lighting the stage that is till in use today. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin in Madison in 1920 before receiving a Master of Arts degree in architecture from Harvard in 1923. After college, McCandless worked for some time as an architect before becoming a lighting consultant. McCandless designed the lights for the Center Theater, part of New York's Radio City. They were the prototypes of what would become the Leko. Stanley McCandless and George Pierce Baker created Yale's School of Drama in 1925. He offered the first class in stage lighting in 1926. While teaching at Yale, he influenced students like Tharon Musser and Jean Rosenthal. While at Yale, McCandless published many books on stage lighting, including "A Glossary of Stage Lighting" in 1926, "A Syllabus of Stage Lighting" in 1927, and "A Method of Lighting the Stage" in 1932. The method he outlined in his texts is still widely used today. Stanley MCandless's method is used widely in many theaters today. It aims to create light that appears as natural as possible. Stanely McCandless's method was published in his book, "A Method of Lighting the Stage", in 1932. It outlines four major elements needed to light the stage. Element 1: Intensity The intensity of the lighting must correspond to the with the makeup of the actor(s) will be wearing. It must also complement any backgrounds or set pieces on the stage. It is important to use the right instrument at the right wattage to achieve even lighting. It may be necessary to shutter off the light to get the desired effect. Some gels may cause the wattage to be adjusted, as darker colors tend to block more light. The best angle for the actor to be lit is 45°. Element 2: Color Color must also correspond with the make up of the people on stage. color can help to augment the actor's face while on stage. The motivating light must be kept in mind deciding the color. Be cautious when deciding what colors to work with, as they can affect how costumes look. Using two complementary colors from opposite sides of the actor can make the actor more visible. For example, using a very subtle amber gel opposite a light, soft blue gel can create a flattering neutral light that will illuminate the actor in a natural way. Certain colors should be avoided, such as greens, blues , and reds, while others, such as ambers, pinks, and steel blues, should be used instead. They illuminate actors without distorting their appearance. Element 3: Distribution Birdie, e Bye. "A Brief History of Stage Lighting." Northern State University:: Aberdeen, SD. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 May 2013. <http://www3.northern.edu/wild/LiteDes/ldhist.htm#educators>.
"McCandless Method - ControlBooth." ControlBooth - ControlBooth News. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 May 2013. <http://www.controlbooth.com/wiki/Collaborative+Articles:McCandless+Method>.
McCandless, Stanley. A method of lighting the stage. 4th ed. New York: Theatre Arts Books, 1958. Print.
Parker, W. Oren, and R. Craig Wolf. " Color and Light`." Scene design and stage lighting. 6th ed. Fort Worth: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1990. 390-392. Print.
Reader, Pete. "A Choice of Color :: StageSpot." Theatrical & Stage Lighting Supplies for your Production Needs :: StageSpot. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2013. <http://www.stagespot.com/colorchoice.html>.
Reader, Pete. "A Choice of Color :: StageSpot." Theatrical & Stage Lighting Supplies for your Production Needs :: StageSpot. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2013. <http://www.stagespot.com/colorchoice.html>. Distribution is, in essence, dramatic visibility. As such, the whole stage does not have to be lit with the same intensity, as not all parts of the stage are going to be equally important in each scene. Light from different directions will lend different effects to any given scene. Light from below casts shadows on an actor’s face, and light from directly above will provide little to no illumination. It was discovered during the Renaissance that the most natural lighting comes from over ones shoulder, diagonally. Plasticity is a quality that is described as “the position of objects in relation to each other and their solidity of form”. Light from 45° gives the most plasticity to the scene. As mentioned in “Color”, a warm and cool from opposite each other will sculpt the actors face the best, lending the most plasticity. When distributing the light, the motivation light of the scene must be kept in mind. Daylight, moonlight, and light from fixtures such as floor lamps all project different kinds of light from different places. Regardless, for most scenes the instrument should e hidden from the audience. Lights should be hung near the ceiling to achieve the proper angles needed for a well-lit stage. For ease of use, the stage may be divided into areas. Lights should be evenly lit across the areas and blended to provide even cover. The use of diffusers or step lenses to blend the edges may be necessary, or, alternatively, a scratched gel frame. Using the correct instrument is crucial, as different ones have different abilities and may not be right for any given scene. Element 4: Control Control is control of intensity, color, distribution, and changes. When using the cool and warm method, you will most likely have to manipulate the intensities until they are balanced. More often than not, each color will be at a different value because of how different colors transmit light differently and because each instrument will be in a different place. Recording the positions and values of each instrument will be helpful in keeping everything organized, and may be used when making changes to the lighting at the board. However, changes must be subtle unless one wishes for a jarring effect that will distract the audience. Changes in color are difficult, as one gel must be switched out for another. There are some mechanical methods of doing so, but the effect is not subtle. Multiple lights of different colors are sometimes utilized to provide a wider range to work with. The lighting instruments themselves are also difficult to move, and as a general rule only floor units are moved. Cool and warm gels opposite each other Neutral light on an actor and a stage A warm and a cool, opposite at 45°. Stanley McCandless retired from his job as a teacher in 1964. He died at the age of 70 in 1967.
All of his professional papers are held at Yale, where he lectured. Though he is long dead, Stanley McCandless continues to be an influence in the area of stage lighting. At Yale where he taught for so many years, the The Stanley R. McCandless Scholarship honors him and is awarded to a student in lighting design. Diagram of how colors mix Example of areas and how they should be blended Birdie, e Bye. "A Brief History of Stage Lighting." Northern State University:: Aberdeen, SD. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 May 2013. <http://www3.northern.edu/wild/LiteDes/ldhist.htm#educators>.
"McCandless Method - ControlBooth." ControlBooth - ControlBooth News. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 May 2013. <http://www.controlbooth.com/wiki/Collaborative+Articles:McCandless+Method>.
McCandless, Stanley. A method of lighting the stage. 4th ed. New York: Theatre Arts Books, 1958. Print.
Parker, W. Oren, and R. Craig Wolf. " Color and Light`." Scene design and stage lighting. 6th ed. Fort Worth: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1990. 390-392. Print.
Reader, Pete. "A Choice of Color :: StageSpot." Theatrical & Stage Lighting Supplies for your Production Needs :: StageSpot. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2013. <http://www.stagespot.com/colorchoice.html>.
Reader, Pete. "A Choice of Color :: StageSpot." Theatrical & Stage Lighting Supplies for your Production Needs :: StageSpot. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2013. <http://www.stagespot.com/colorchoice.html>. Sources: 1. At what college did Stanley McCandless lecture? 2. What kind of light did he prototype? 3. What are the four elements of his method? 4. What is a name of one of his books? 5. What is the method used for creating neutral light? 6. What is plasticity? 7. What is the best kind of lighting, as discovered in the Renaissance? 8. What is one way to soften the edge of a light? 9. What was Stanley McCandless before he was a teacher? 10. How old was he when he died?
Full transcript