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The 7 Deadly Sins and Our Modern World

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Amanda Smith

on 12 June 2011

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Transcript of The 7 Deadly Sins and Our Modern World

THE SINS “Sin is not hurtful because it is forbidden, but it is forbidden because it is hurtful” -Benjamin Franklin The 7 Deadly Sins and Validity Through a Modern Understanding This Prezi presented portfolio will examine the 7 deadly sins and the legitimacy of their “deadliness” with a modern understanding of human nature and religious content. This presentation will keep the audience intrigued through the use of varying media forms. I will examine the sins presence and meaning through religious texts. Photography will be used to illustrate the sins in another form. I will research using journal articles and interviewing professionals to delve into the topic. In addition, a connection will be made with your class and the psychological aspects of the issue. Poetry and artwork will examine an artistic aspect. I will present professional information to allow the audience to create a stance upon the 7 deadly sins. This Prezi presented portfolio will examine the 7 deadly sins and the legitimacy of their “deadliness” with a modern understanding of human nature and religious content. This presentation will keep the audience intrigued through the use of varying media forms. I will examine the sins presence and meaning through religious texts. Photography will be used to illustrate the sins in another form. I will research using journal articles and interviewing professionals to delve into the topic. In addition, a connection will be made with your class and the psychological aspects of the issue. Poetry and artwork will examine an artistic aspect. I will present professional information to allow the audience to create a stance upon the 7 deadly sins. Brand New-The Archer’s Bows are Broken
Who do you carry that torch for, my young man?
Do you believe in anything?
Do you carry it around just to burn things down?

Meet me tonight on the turnpike, my darling
cause we believe in everything
If we sweat all these debts then we're sure to drown
so let's strap ourselves up to this engine now
With our God who we found laying under the back seat

What did you learn tonight?
You're shouting so loud, you barely enjoyed this broken thing.
You're a voice that never sings, is what I say
You are freezing over hell
You are bringing on the end, you do so well
You can only blame yourself, it's what I say

Oh, order your daughters to ignore me think that will sort me?
and sweep me under the rug
While you're beating with a book everyone that book tells you to love

There is an ember in the heart of the kiln
And it's burning hot with love
Burning out my center till there's nothing but dust
rolling me with care into your cigarette
Cause the God I believe in never worked on a campaign trail

What did you learn tonight?
You're shouting so loud, you barely enjoyed this broken thing.
You're a voice that never sings, is what I say
You are freezing over hell
You are bringing on the end, you do so well
You can only blame yourself, it's what I say

Who do you carry that torch for, my young man?
Do you believe in anything?
Do you carry it around just to burn things to the ground?

What did you learn tonight?
You're shouting so loud, you barely enjoyed this broken thing.
You're a voice that never sings, is what I say
You are freezing over hell
You are bringing on the end, you do so well
You can only blame yourself, it's what I say

Feels like we could escape
and I don't mind throwing away this filthy silver song
If you try running a maze of your lies
It's too hard to save if you've thrown out everyone This song is about an adolescent’s untraditional view on god. The last line is the most powerful for me I this song, it concludes with the words “it’s too hard to save if you’ve thrown out everyone” explaining that god cannot be a savior if he is strict to his sins and damns those who are sinful. The lyrics of this song express the rules of the bible are not plausible in a modern world. The opening lyrics ask “who do you carry that torch for…do you believe in anything? Do you carry it around just to burn things down?” I love this introduction and it’s symbolism to religion as destructive in a traditional format. If we feel guilty for all the sins we commit (which are intertwined in almost everything we do) we will self-distract or in a more musical form “If we sweat all these debts then we're sure to drown”. God is everywhere, if you believe in him, he is even in our sins because he loves us regardless so everything we do, we do “with our God who we found laying under the backseat”. If you judge people by their sins you’re not following the rules of the bible because god tells you to love and forgive sinner as he does; “While you're beating with a book everyone that book tells you to love”. God is a beautiful thing to believe in if you understand what his message is trying to say. He wants everyone to love each other to be “burning hot with love, burning out [their] center till there’s nothing but dust”. In this song and my own personal belief those who believe in a strict enforcement of sins are missing out on the true beauty of religion. The sins are a guideline to help assist decisions from hurting oneself, again in my personal opinion. In other words; If we work so hard in staying in the lines, we are sure to miss out on the real beauty. Brand New: The Archers Bows Have Broken Our experience of the world requires us to perceive that things are not as they should be. We do not experience the world of unblemished blessedness that is revealed in the first two chapters of the book of Genesis. To the contrary, we experience a world filled with mosquitoes, viruses, earthquakes, and malevolence in the animal world. We are surrounded by the evidence of death and decay, and we see it in our own bodies. Furthermore, we see the violence and sin that human beings cause and commit. We are not only those who experience the violence of nature, but we also know ourselves to be creatures whose own nature is often violent. To observe humanity is to see the undeniable reality that something has gone horribly wrong. Even as the Bible begins the story with creation, it immediately moves to an explanation of what has gone wrong. Again, such an account is required of every worldview, and every philosophy of life must provide some explanation for why human beings are as we are and why we act as we act. The Bible directs those who asked this question to the Garden of Eden and to the event we know as the Fall. When Adam and Eve sinned, they brought corruption and rebellion into the very heart of God’s perfect creation. The only creature made in God’s own image rebelled against him and sought to rob him of his own glory. The nature of sin is just this—we would deny the Creator his rightful glory and would seek this for ourselves. The consequences of the Fall were immediate and catastrophic. Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden and cut off from the tree of life (Gen. 3:23-24). The earth, which had freely given of its fruit and crops, will now turn hostile, and human beings will have to work with the sweat of the brow to gain a hard-earned harvest (Gen. 3:17-19). Human reproduction will now be accompanied by pain and labor. Most importantly, the Fall explains why human beings are no longer at peace with our Creator. God’s verdict on Adam’s sin was immediate. As Genesis reveals and the New Testament affirms, when sin came, death came. Our understanding of the Fall and of the sinfulness of humanity is absolutely necessary for any adequate understanding of the human condition. We cannot possibly understand human existence without reference to sin. The Bible steadfastly refuses to allow us to find the cause and substance of the human problem outside of ourselves. Instead, the Bible points directly to our individual culpability, even as it affirms that every single human being inherits Adam’s sin and guilt. The complex of human sinfulness is so vast that it encompasses every individual human sin and the totality of human depravity as demonstrated in the rise and fall of nations and the course of human history. The Bible’s account of the human problem goes far beyond a mere explanation of human foibles and failures. In essence, the Bible turns directly to the human creature and offers an indictment of our rebellion against God. Even as Adam and Eve sought to create aprons in order to hide their own nakedness (Gen. 3:7), human beings will attempt any number of creative and desperately-asserted explanations for what is wrong with us. In other words, the Christian account of humanity and human behavior runs into direct collision with all other worldviews. This is particularly evident when we compare the Bible’s account of human sin with contemporary attempts to explain the brokenness of humanity by means of economic, sociological, political, or psychotherapeutic explanations. The Bible affirms the inherent goodness of humanity in terms of the pristine goodness of God’s creation as it was in the beginning. But the Bible also explains that, after the Fall, every single human being is, in his or her own way, a rebel and insurrectionist who is attempting to dethrone God and take his glory as our own. Thus, when we look at humanity, read the newspapers, watch the news reports, or tend to our own children, Christians must be constantly aware that what we witness is the working out of sin and a demonstration of the fallenness of humanity. Yet, our most direct evidence for this fallenness is what we see when we look at the reflection in our mirror. Every worldview must give an account of what is wrong with humanity and why the cosmos demonstrates so much death, decay, and apparent meaninglessness. As Christians, we know that the world as we see it contains vestiges of the glory of God that shine through the corruption of the universe blighted by sin. Nevertheless, we are constantly reminded that the entire universe is groaning under the burden of human sinfulness. We are unsurprised by human sin and the awful consequences of that sin. We are able to endure this knowledge because we are confident that this is not the end of the story. A Journal Article written by Albert Mohler of AlbertMohler.com Suppose we examine, and even number, the spiritual benefits of frequent Confession as identified by the modern popes.
Self-Knowledge is Increased. How blind we are to our own failings and weaknesses. We are hawk-eyed in seeing the faults of others, but stone blind when it comes to our own. There is nothing in the world that we more need to grow in humility than to recognize how stupid and helpless we are in the face of temptation. How desperately we need God's grace to see ourselves as we really are.
Bad Habits are Corrected. Another word for bad habits is "vices." These bad habits are acquired by the repetition of bad actions. We may have the habit of unkind words, or of selfish behavior, which may have taken years to acquire. On the natural level, it would take years to change these bad habits into the opposite virtues. But with the grace of the sacrament of Confession, we can overcome these vices in record time, beyond all human expectation.
Conscience is Purified. We do not commonly speak of purifying the conscience. But we should. What is a pure conscience? A pure conscience is one that sees clearly, we may say instinctively, what should be done in a given situation and how to do it. The opposite of a pure conscience is a dull or insensitive conscience. People will do all kinds of evil, commit every kind of sin, without even realizing that they are doing wrong. The sacrament of Penance purifies our mind to recognize God's will in every circumstance of our lives, instantly and almost without reflection. How? By the action of the Holy Spirit, whose gift of counsel enlightens the mind to know exactly what the Lord wants us to do and how to do it the moment we are faced with a moral decision.
The Will is Strengthened. We could spend not just a whole conference on this subject, but a semester course on the value of what I call "the sacrament of courage." Certainly, we all have a free will. But our natural inclination is to do our own will, to choose what we want and reject what we do not want. The very expression "pro-choice" has become a synonym for the culture of death in our society. Christ told us to love others as He has loved us, even to dying out of love for another person. The world is now telling us in the laws of most nations to murder innocent unborn children out of self-love.
Do we ever need to have our wills strengthened to resist our love of self and submit these wills to the will of God! I do not hesitate to say it is the single most desperate need as we come to the close of the twentieth century. The self has been literally deified. In one Western university after another, the philosophy of Immanuel Kant is the staple diet of the academic curriculum. At the root of Kantian morality is the principle of the autonomy of the will. My will is the basic and final norm of my conduct.
Did we ask whether we need the sacramental grace of Confession to strengthen our wills to submit to the will of God? In our age of self-idolatry, this grace is indispensable, dare I say, for the survival of Christianity.
Salutary Self-Control is Attained. A standard English dictionary contains, by actual count, three hundred eighty terms beginning with the word "self." Among these are such terms as self-absorption, self-admiration, self-advancement, self-applause, self-approbation, self-assertion, self-assurance, to mention only the words with an "a" after the prefix "self."
To its credit, the dictionary defines self-control as "restraint exercised over one's own impulses, emotions, or desires."
But everything depends on what we mean by "restraint." All that we have so far said about the spontaneous tendency we have to satisfy our own desires brings out the importance of the Christian meaning of self-control.
Our faith tells us that we have a fallen human nature. Part of that nature is the loss of the gift of integrity that our first parents possessed before they had sinned. From the moment of our conception in our mother's womb, we already have the spontaneous tendency to desire what is pleasant and to run away from what is painful.

Did we ask whether we need the sacramental grace of Confession to strengthen our wills to submit to the will of God? In our age of self-idolatry, this grace is indispensable, dare I say, for the survival of Christianity.

On these premises, self-control means the mastery of our impulses to conform to the mind and will of the Creator. Not everything we want is pleasing to Him, and not everything we dislike is contrary to His will. Self-control means mastering our thoughts and desires to correspond to the infinite mind and will of God.
That is why the Church, founded by the Incarnate God, is telling us to have frequent access to what Christ has instituted in the sacrament of Confession. We need the light which this sacrament assures us and the strength we so desperately need to surrender our "Selves" to the almighty Self from whom we came and for whom we were made.
We Become More Sinless. By the frequent and reverent reception of the sacrament of Penance, we make more perfect the justification we first received in Baptism. What does this mean? It means we become more and more sinless. Christ thereby exercises His saving redemption on our souls by cleansing us more and more and thus preparing us better and better for that kingdom of glory where nothing undefiled can enter and where only the sinless have a claim to enjoy the vision of the All-holy God. And who in his right mind would claim he or she is already sinless?
We Become More Conformed to Jesus Christ. We become more like Jesus Christ in the power to practice the virtues that characterized His visible life on earth. What virtues are they? We become more humble and better able to conquer our foolish and stubborn pride. And the very humiliation of telling our sins to another sinner is God's way of telling us, "If you confess, I will make you more humble." We become more patient in bearing with pain and enduring the people that God puts into our lives. Sometimes I think pain should have a masculine and feminine gender. Most of our suffering, most of the difficulties and problems and tribulations, that we have to endure on earth, if your lives are like mine, come from other people. And of course, we pay them the favor of being corresponding graces of tribulation in their lives. Through this sacrament we become more conformed to Jesus by becoming more prayerful in greater awareness of God's majesty and, therefore, our need to pay attention to God, and in greater awareness of our weakness and constant need for assistance from the Lord. This is one place where Jesus did not have to pray to overcome His sinful tendencies. Above all we become more loving in giving and giving and giving ourselves according to the divine will even as Jesus kept giving Himself to the will of His Father even to the last drop of His blood.
We Become More Submissive to the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit, dwelling in the depths of our hearts, is always speaking to us, but we are not always listening to Him. We are so busy with so many things, so preoccupied with ourselves, our interests and concerns, that He is often not only the unseen but, I am afraid, the unappreciated Guest in our souls. As John the Baptist said of the Savior to his contemporaries, "There is one in our midst whom we know not." And if we are going to be submissive to this Spirit of God, the first condition is that we are aware that there is a Spirit, that He has a voice and that He is talking. You do not listen to silence. And this is divine speech.
The Spirit of God wants nothing more than for us to pay attention to Him. Pay Him the courtesy, if you will, of recognizing that He is within us. The Spirit of God wants us to thank Him for all the good things He has given us. He wants us to keep asking Him. That is why He keeps creating problems. Those are divine signals. Did you know that? They are divine shouts, "Listen to me. Thanks. Thanks for at least looking at me. And except for the pain or sorrow or trial or temptation, knowing you," He tells us, "you would not even bother thinking of me. Thanks! Now that you are awake, listen!" So we rub our eyes and say, "Yes, Lord."
But mainly the Holy Spirit wants us to be submissive to His will whether this be obedience to His commands when He tells us, "Do this," or "Do not do that," or when He gently invites us to do something more than we have to under penalty of sin, when He just whispers, "Would you mind doing this?" or "Would you mind avoiding that? Not because you have to, but because I would like you to show that you love me." All of this, and far more than human speech can describe, is available to us, so the Church of God tells us, by our frequent and reverent reception of the sacrament of Christ's peace. The Spiritual and Psychological Value of Frequent Confession
FATHER JOHN A. HARDON, S.J. http://www.catholiceducation.org/articles/religion/re0918.htm This article examines the benefits of confessing sins. I found this relevant because it showed how sins provide a guideline for people to know what is right and wrong. Because (in some and my own) opinion sins are not avoidable due to the fact that they are tied into our biological needs or wants. By having a way to confess the things one has done wrong is (according to this article) beneficial. First off, being able to recognize sins as wrong is good for oneself. Identification of right and wrong is important to have. Secondly, ability to gain forgiveness (even from an outer figure such as god) can ease the soul of guilt. Having a way to cleanse from mistakes or wrong-doings, is an amazing feature that humans have. We choose to feel each emotion such as guilt. We can choose to take away emotions also, and that’s what makes religion so powerful. I also agree with this article’s stand-point and find it just as inspiring as the last. I believe my personal standpoint is somewhere in the middle of the both ideas. This article discusses the original sin as an example for the sinfulness of mankind to follow. Albert Mohler provides a sophisticated stance of human nature as being sinful. He explains that Christian life began with corruption of god’s glory. Mohler proves that “human sinfulness is so vast that it encompasses every individual” . In my personal opinion, I view this article as inspiring and honestly powerful. It captures the “rules” of sin as made to be broken, as our humannature began with the corruption of it. I personally agree with his standpoint despite my own following with religion. The temptation to resist to desire to sin is built within us. It is inevitable to crave sin. Humans are people of sin. Interpretation: Interpretation: World round are my brethren, all people are my kin
But the things that control our lives are the seven deadly sins
We see others’ possessions and our ENVY takes control
We say we wish that we were them, we give away our souls
We need to have our sustenance, but GLUTTONY is a fault
Our GREED becomes an open wound we’re pouring on the salt
We all have a libido, but looks turn into LUST
But this will get us nowhere, in the end it’s dust to dust
SLOTH has made us lazy as we sit and lie in wait
We never do anything for ourselves, something we should hate
In our own time we look into the mirror, we are all becoming VAIN
This is wrong, we know it’s true, it drives us all insane
Others’ comments anger us, but rage turns into WRATH
If you want to change this sinful world then you can do the math
These things are of our making, our lights are going dim
The world’s been taken over by the seven deadly sins

Create Date : Tuesday, November 04, 2008
Macklin MacKenzie
http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/seven-deadly-sins-7/ Seven Deadly Sins: I am guilty of all sins,
since the first day I met you,
and deeply feel in love with you,
as you made my world turn.

As lust has conquered me,
having you always on my mind,
dreaming with you in every way,
wanting to make you all mine.

As I have been glutton,
not having enough of you,
always wanting more of you,
not sharing you with anyone.

As greed has been inevitable,
needing you to be with me,
not giving people time around you,
always having you by my side.

Being called a sloth,
since I do not love god,
as I have no room in my heart,
since it is all dedicated to you. Going through the wave of wrath,
taking my anger out on all out there,
which have hurt you in any way,
securing you from all harm.

Feeling loads of envy,
not wanting you to leave me,
pushing everyone around you away,
as I keep you tightly in my arms.

Looking around having pride,
as I am the one which has you,
feeling special that I have such a gem,
a limitless fortune which I love.

Yet I have a great hurt inside,
so I say if loving you is a sin,
then I will meet you in hell,
and burn slowly by your side.

Create Date : Wednesday, August 06, 2008
Javier Falcon
http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/7-deadly-sins-3/ 7 DeadlySins *For a clearer version please visit my blog: the7xsins.wordpress.com The Christian Worldview as Master Narrative: Sin and its Consequences Polled from 10440 voters on http://whitestonejournal.com/index.php/seven-deadly-sins Basic Needs Safety & Security Belonging Esteem Cognative
knowledge Beauty Self-
actualization Mazlo's Pyramid vs The Sins you need food to survive (which contradicts with gluttony) you also need sexual interaction to maintain health (lust) The most common form of greed is in the wanting of money which is most ways contributes to your safety Lust is also connected here due to the human desire for intimacy. Also, one can greed for companionship. One can greed for confidence, and if one has this it is pride; another sin Sloth is most guilty for limiting the ability for this Sloth limits us from viewing beauty, and greed could be considered as admiration of others beauty This photo shows how a glutton can be exumed by their personal desire to consume. This photo shows the multiple faces of anger, represtented through the multipal-colored artwork. This artwork shows a man consuming the world through eating it. This is relation to a similar sin, gluttony. This photo shows the neglect to understand time as a constant limit to our lives. This photo represents the envy of someone else's acomplishments. This photo represents the way pride can abstractly destroy the brain. This artwork represents the suggestive nature of ones need to be lustful. The model's body is welcoming and craving therefore lustful. Works Cited Quote: thinkexist.com
Research: cited on spot (in THE SINS)
Journal articles:
1.) Arthur Muller.com, Arthur Muller, January 10, 2011
2.) Father John A Hardon, SJ www.catholiceducation.org/
Class Connection: Maslow’s Pyramid vs The Sins
Photos and artwork: cited on spot (THE SINS)
Poetry: cited on spot
Song lyrics from: www.sing365.com
Blog: cited on spot
Decoration photos:
Music note: http://www.fundraw.com/clipart/clip-art/1786/Musical-Note/
Journal photo: http://www.wordlifeonline.com/2011/05/book-of-rhymes.html
Head photo: http://www.boingboing.net/2004/12/08/medical_curiosity_cl.html
Word press photo: http://www.visualfit.com/contact.php
Original sin photo (left): www.oceansbridge.com/oil-paintings/product/44469/originalsin
Original sin photo (right): www.paintinghere.com/painting/Genesis_The_Fall_and_Expulsion_from_Paradise_The_Original_Sin_3683.html Research In my opinion, our biggest form of sloth is found in the neglect to observe beauty. Today, there is an increased ignorance in natural beauties. The nature of beauty os spewed so far that our identities are lacking true admiration. This photo used makeup to examine true vs artificial beauty. This photo shows why I became intrested in this topic and religion in general. After the passing of my dear friend "BVK" I began searching for an explination and found only one; that someone or something else needed him more. This photo captures the happiness of embracing religion. Forgive me father for I have lived
And apologize for though I’ve sinned
Guilty but guiltless and free
Recognizing brain chemistry Forgive me I wanted to create a simple poem that could be anailized to say much more. "Forgive me father" is in referance to the catholic way of confession. Also, the poem expressed no form of aplogy mer Forgive me father for I have lived
and sadened to confess I’ve sinned
Guilty but guiltless and free
Recognizing brain chemistry This simple poem exposes a big meaning. "Forgive me father" is a direct referance to catholic confession. Also, throughout the poem there is no expression of apology merely the understanding that the narators actions were wrong. The narrator understands this and feels no guilt. Forgive me by Amanda Smith Interview 1.) Having pride or vanity could also be considered possessing confidence within oneself. Is vanity the onset of all other sin or merely a humanistic trait in which we all posses?
2.) In order to posses envy one must understand what they desire in his or her life. Is having the ability to recognize goals a quality to appreciate or look down upon?

3.) Gluttony is a major part of modern culture in most industries especially in food consumption in America. In developed countries, is gluttony still a factor when food is plentiful enough that what you consume will not take away from others?

4.) Lust, the most infamous sin craves personal pleasure. However, that pleasure in some experience is needed to maintain an adult health. Therefore is it sinful to crave health?

5.) Lust also contributes directly with reproduction of species. Is it selfish to crave the homeostasis of mankind?

6.) Most people are believed to experiences wrath on a regular basis, as well as some having mental illnesses in which increase the amount of anger. Should religions look down upon those with a psychological impairment?

7.) Do most religions view mental disabilities as demonic or health issues?

8.) Covetousness is the desire to develop an increase of materialistic gain. Is this still wrong for one who supplies for others and wants to provide for them?

9.) In a modern form, sloth is portrayed as procrastination or laziness. Whether this be spiritual or physical does one not deserve a break to relax from everyday chaos?

10.) In your professional opinion are the 7 deadly sins still valid with a modern understanding of the human brain?

11.) Is sin, being a construct, a form of metaphorical consequence for bad deeds? I interviewed Mark T. Sheehan's philosophy club leader, Mr. Nicolas Ives to get his interpritation of the 7 deadly sins. Here are the notes I took during the interview.
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