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Winter

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by

Amy Nguyen

on 23 September 2015

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Transcript of Winter

Winter

William Shakespeare
Author: William Shakespeare
Written in 1594-1595
A part of one of Shakespeare's earliest plays
Introduction

The title of the poem is winter because it is describing snapshots of winter scenes even though the the word "winter" never appears in the poem.
Rhyme Scheme
Imagery

Repetition

Onomatopoeia

Syntax

Literary Devices
Theme
Meaning/Symbolism

Most of the poem has anaphora in sentence structure

Repetition of the last four lines in each stanza represents importance

Iambic tetrameter

Has an ABABCCDEF rhyme scheme
Title
The speaker conveys the winter as an unpleasant but realistic
one when he says words like foul, raw, and hiss or in line 4-6 to bring more to his perspective on the winter. He does put a satisfying feeling on the last line of each stanza when he says,"A merry note,
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot." to show warmth from being inside and not outside in the cold.
Mood and Tone
Village rural life during the winter

Speaker is familiar with this way of life

Culture of the lower class
Culture
Winter
Amy Nguyen, Cassidy Gadsden, Madeleine Underwood, Tryton Shelp
When icicles hang by the wall
And Dick the shepherd blows his nail
And Tom bears logs into the hall,
And milk comes frozen home in pail,
When Blood is nipped and ways be foul,
Then nightly sings the staring owl,
Tu-who;
Tu-whit, tu-who: a merry note,
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.

When all aloud the wind doth blow,
And coughing drowns the parson's saw,
And birds sit brooding in the snow,
And Marian's nose looks red and raw
When roasted crabs hiss in the bowl,
Then nightly sings the staring owl,
Tu-who;
Tu-whit, tu-who: a merry note,
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.


Ts
The theme is how people make do with what the have. The poem shows the essence of winter and how normally its a bitter season, but it shows how humanity has overcome nature's lack of hospitality and have made it livible and enjoyable.
The main idea from this poem shows the speaker's observations of the villagers' adaptations to the winter season.
It also portrays the speaker's feelings toward the unpleasant cold winter.
A contrast on how harsh it was outside in the winter and the warmth of inside a home
At the end of of each of the stanzas, it mentions how the owl's song is a merry note, which is ironic considering owl's singing isn't as pleasant as a normal person would think but haunting

Sources
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Feathery Friends in Spring (Shakespeare)." Shmoop.com.
Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 22 Sept. 2015.

Shmoop Editorial Team. "Birds in Winter." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov.
2008. Web. 22 Sept. 2015.

"Spring And Winter by William Shakespeare." - Famous Poems, Famous Poets. N.p., n.d.
Web. 23 Sept. 2015.

"90. Winter. William Shakespeare. 1909-14. English Poetry I: From Chaucer to Gray. The
Harvard Classics." 90. Winter. William Shakespeare. 1909-14. English Poetry I: From Chaucer to Gray. The Harvard Classics. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2015.

Rooney, Kathleen. "Spring." Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 23 Sept.
2015.

"Shakespeare: Poem on Spring." Spring, by William Shakespeare. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Sept.
2015.
When daisies pied and violets blue
And lady-smocks all silver-white
And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue
Do paint the meadows with delight,
The cuckoo then, on every tree,
Mocks married men; for thus sings he,
Cuckoo;
Cuckoo, cuckoo: Oh word of fear,
Unpleasing to a married ear!

When shepherds pipe on oaten straws,
And merry larks are plowmen’s clocks,
When turtles tread, and rooks, and daws,
And maidens bleach their summer smocks,
The cuckoo then, on every tree,
Mocks married men; for thus sings he,
Cuckoo;
Cuckoo, cuckoo: Oh word of fear,
Unpleasing to a married ear!
Love's Labour's Lost
Spring
William Shakespeare
Context
The Overall Contrasts
Spring vs. Winter
Spring
Winter
The Cuckoo in Spring
The Owl in Winter
Life vs. Death
Happiness vs. Sadness
Sadness vs. Happiness
Pleasant symbol with darker meaning
Unpleasant symbol with
a happier meaning
Full transcript